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Introduction to Fashion FSHD 1302

PCM Sections for Fall 2010

Sections 17513 (16 week:  August 23 thru December 12, 2010)

and20486 (12 week:  September 20 thru December 12, 2010)

 

Instructor:                    Rita Banninger

Office:                         PIN Campus, Room 413

Phone:                        (512) 223-1790x25854 (anytime), (512) 223-8105 during office hours)

FAX#:                         (512) 223-8900

 

Mailing Address:          Austin Community College

                                    Pinnacle Campus

                                    Attn:  Rita Banninger

                                    7748 Hwy 290 West

                                    Austin, Texas  78736

 

Office Hours:  Tuesday and Thursday, 12:45 – 2:30 p.m., Room 413

 

Marketing Department Website:  http://www.austincc.edu/mkt

 

 

 

ORIENTATION:      

 

Students must do an online orientation through ACC Blackboard.  After reading the orientation information students will need to complete an orientation quiz.  See page 15 of this syllabus for directions to access BLACKBOARD on the ACC website.  The online orientation quiz needs to be completed the first week of class. 

 

 

WITHDRAWAL DEADLINE for Fall 2010 is November 18, 2010 for both the 16-week session and for the 12 week session.

 

Students who DO NOT complete the course work on schedule and WHO DO NOT withdraw themselves will receive an F. 

 

If your name, address, and/or telephone number or email addresses changes, notify the instructor immediately.  This will insure that you receive all the necessary information and keep your name on the class rolls.  THIS IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT.

 

MASTER COURSE SYLLABUS/DESCRIPTION CAN BE FOUND AT:  http://www2.austincc.edu/mkt

 

 

MARKETING DEPARTMENT FACULTY WEBPAGE:

 

http://www.austincc.edu/mkt/faculty/

 

 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR:

http://www.austincc.edu/support/admissions/acacal09.php

 

 

INTRODUCTION:  (Course Rationale)

 

Introduction to Fashion(PCM) is a computer-required course offered to those students who are looking for an innovative, independent method to complete the course but at the same time cannot attend a class on a regular basis.  These students should be strongly motivated, mature and self-disciplined individuals.  Each student is responsible to maintain satisfactory progress during the semester by reading course materials (textbook and online), accomplishing the required project, taking the required exams by the prescribed dates (see below) and accessing BLACKBOARD to do assignments and discussion board.

 

The non-traditional instruction version (also called distance learning PCM) of Introduction to Fashion is a viable alternative to the traditional classroom method.  Students are advised that the specific dates in this syllabus must be met.  Each week there will be added course materials on BLACKBOARD entered by the teacher (and students wanting to earn extra credit) with a short quiz at the end of the week.   All requirements must be completed by the end of the semester. 

 

 

 

You must take each exam on or before a specific date as well as turning in the project on requested date listed below in addition to doing online requirement as scheduled.

 

 

Required textbook:  The World of Fashion, 4th Edition, Jay Diamond and Ellen Diamond, Fairchild Publications, 2008.

Printed material in the text must be read and studied, the terms and review questions at the end of each chapter should be studied, and exams taken on or before the dates listedbelow.  Also, one individual project described in this syllabus must be completed by the specified deadline date, and Blackboard articles as assigned.

 

Introduction to Fashion.  A survey of the world of fashion businesses.  This course is an introduction to the creation and merchandising of fashion through the study of fashion vocabulary, the fashion process, fashion publications, and career opportunities.

 

To acquaint the student with the fundamentals of fashion and basic principles that govern all fashion movement and change.

 

1.      to learn basic fashion terminology, and to understand, define and grasp key terms, principles, concepts and theories involved in course coverage.

 

2.      to explore the manner in which economic, sociological and psychological factors influence fashion demand.

 

3.      to understand the roles and responsibilities of designers, manufacturers, and retailers.

 

4.      to acquaint the student with the history and development, organization, and operation merchandising and marketing

         activities and trends of industries engaged in producing and marketing fashion.

 

5.      to explore the impact of fashion merchandising on our everyday lives, and be able to identify trends, recognize leaders,

         and industry momentum as it effects individual fashion decisions.

 

 

You are required to:

1.      Read the required textbook material.

2.      Prepare yourself for the course exams by reviewing terms and review questions in each chapter.

3.      Take 5 exams during the semester on or before each deadline date on the established schedule.

4.      Prepare an individual report, choosing one of the topics listed below, and submit that report along with a copy of the articles/internet sites, etc., used to research that report.  This report must be turned in by the deadline date.  Plagiarism will not be tolerated.  Any reports found copied from another student or the internet will receive a grade of Zero points.  NO late papers will be accepted.

5.      Do assignments and participate on the discussion board on BLACKBOARD.  Assignments will be online articles the instructor will place on BLACKBOARD pertaining to the designing, production or marketing of fashion which students will be quizzed on.  Students will be notified via email or on the “Announcement Page” when an assignment is posted.  If time allows we will have professionals from the world of fashion answer questions you would like to ask and discuss on the discussion board.  Students will be notified via email when there will be a discussion board assignment.

 

 

See http://www2.austincc.edu/testctrfor hours/locations/policies of the ACC testing centers.

A.  There are five required exams for this course.  They may be taken an any

      of the following ACC testing centers:

 

 

Northridge                   Rio Grande             Eastridge         Cypress  Creek     

       Pinnacle              South Austin             Riverside          Round Rock           

 

Off Campus Sites:  Fredericksburg and San Marcos

 

Note:  Please use the scantron form provided by the testing centers.  They will also provide you with the EXAM and scratch paper as needed.  You WILL need to supply your own #2 pencil with a good eraser.

B.     The exams will be made up of true/false and multiple choice questions which will be answered on the scantron form.  You will have approximately 40 -45 of these types of questions worth one or two points each.  You will also have 2 or 3 short answer questions (draw a diagram, name and explain a concept, short essay, etc.)  These will be completed on a separate answer sheet.  The points for each question will be indicated on the exam.  These are NOT open book exams.

ALLEXAMS MUST BE COMPLETED PRIOR TO THE POSTED CLOSING TIMES OF THE TESTING CENTERS.   See http://www2.austincc.edu/testctr for hours/locations/policies of the ACC testing centers.

C.     I recommend that you call to verify that the hours are in fact the same and have not changed.  You MUST present a student ID and a picture ID (license, etc.) at the testing center in order to be able to take the exam.

D.    Dates for the EXAMS are the LAST DAY you may take the exam.  You may take the exam any day up to and through the date listed below.  Any exams taken late are subject to a 10 point penalty.

 

E.     If you are unable to take tests in the ACC Testing Centers (due to living in a different city, state, or country) please let the instructor know as soon as possible as the testing will have to be handled through our Distance Learning Support Services Coordinator who will determine an appropriate proctor and location to oversee your taking the test there.

 

 IMPORTANT—PLEASE NOTE YOUR SECTION NUMBER!!!

 

16 Week Session (Section #17513)

EXAM   TEXT CHAPTERS  VALUE OF EXAM    LAST DAY TO TAKE EXAM

 

    1          Chapters 1 – 7                  15%                September 17, 2010

 

    2          Chapters 8 & 9                 15%                October 1, 2010

 

    3         Chapters 10 – 15              15%                 October 29, 2010

 

    4          Chapters 16 - 19              15%                November 19, 2010

 

    5         Chapters 20 – 22              15%                December  8, 2010

 

                  No retest on EXAM 5

 

 

12 Week Session (Section #20486)

    1          Chapters 1 – 7                  15%               October 1, 2010

 

    2          Chapters 8 & 9                15%                October 18, 2010

 

    3         Chapters 10 – 15             15%                 November 8, 2010

 

    4          Chapters 16 - 19              15%                November 24, 2010

 

    5          Chapters 20 – 22              15%                December 8, 2010

 

 

                 No retest on EXAM 5

 

 

The instructor will grade all parts of the exam.  You may receive your exam grades by contacting the instructor by email or by leaving a self-addressed, stamped postcard.  They will also be posted on Blackboard.  If you make less than 70, you may retake the exam.  However, the second grade will be averaged in with the first grade.  You must make arrangements with the instructor to take a retest WITHIN 5 DAYS after you have taken the exam.  NO RETAKE is available for EXAM #3.  Any test not taken by the deadline date is subject to penalty.

Note:  If you take the last exam (EXAM 5) after the December 8 deadline (after having an acceptable reason) you must take the exam at the Pinnacle Campus Testing Center, so that I will receive the exam prior to my deadline for turning grades in at the end of the semester.  If you desire to take the last exam at another site, you must take EXAM #3 by December 8, 2010.

Each exam is worth 15% of your grade.  You will take the score you earn on it and multiply it by .15 or 15%.  (For example, if you earn a 90, you can multiply 90 by .15 and your total points for that exam will be 13.5 points.) 

 

 

WRITTEN PROJECT   (Mandatory, not optional) 20% of your total grade.

The other 20 % of your grade will come from an individually written project that is due in my office no later than November 30, 2010.  You may select from the following options your choice of written project.  It is to be neatly typed, double-spaced, and approximately 4 – 5 pages in length.  If you choose to fax or send your project to me as an email attachment, please put your name and FSHD 1302 at the top of your paper and make sure to address it to me.  Papers without names will not be graded.  ALWAYS make a backup copy of your paper in case it should be lost in transmission.

Remember to attach a copy of the magazine/periodical articles you used, the internet sites you used, and a bibliography of the texts that you used in researching your assignment.

1.      Select an influential American or International designer, give a brief bio of this individual, and describe what contributions this person made to the world of fashion.  Describe some unique/different styles that they are known for.  Include photos/copies or illustrations of the style/designs they have contributed.  Describe the audience demographics (target market) that they typically design for (age, income level, sex, etc.)  Are they known for couture or off the rack fashions, or both?  Have they licensed their name for products on the market?

 

NOTE:  If you select any of the designers already profiled in the text boxes “World of Fashion Profiles” in your text, then you must supply MORE information than what is already in our text.  Preferably, select some other designer not highly profiled in our text.

2.      Visit 3 men or women’s fashion/sportswear stores (one specialty store, one department store, and one discounter).  Identify the target market (demographics, sex, age, occupation, career, income level) that they serve.  Note the clientele who visit the store.  Describe what styles; designs are carried by each store.  Do they carry fads or classical styles?  Describe the store layout and atmosphere.  How would you improve the lighting, displays, visual merchandising techniques?  How does each type of store compare to one another in terms of price points, brand names, and designer labels? 

Note:  Examples for specialty stores could be Chicos, the Gap, Susan Dell, Ann Taylor, etc.

3.      Collect 7 or 8 fabric/textile swatches or samples.  Attach the swatches of fabric to your paper.  Identify the fabric/textile.  Describe its characteristics (washable, wearable, etc.)  How were the fabrics dyed?  Are they colorfast, solid colored, printed, screen printed, piece dyed, etc.  How are they finished?  (chemical, shrink resistant, perm press, scotchguarded, pre-shrunk, flocked, napped, singed, etc.)  What sort of garments would you make with these fabrics?  Any garments that would not work well with this type of fabric?

Note:  Try to get swatches or remnants from fabric stores.

4.      Peruse/study 4 different internet sites for men/women/children’s wear fashions.  Describe what format the web site used?  Was it user-friendly?  How easy/difficult was it to utilize the site (number of pages, returning to home page, etc.)  Did it include a “shopping cart” feature?  How easy was it to obtain detailed information on items (sizing, color, wash/dry clean info, ordering info).  Was there an email feature for questions/answers?  Who do you think the target market is for each of these sites?  How would you improve the website if it was yours?

 

Note:  Suggestions might be Nordstrom.com, coldwatercreek.com, polo.com, specific designer websites like Betsy Johnson or catalogue companies like Spiegel, Lands End, etc.

 

BLACKBOARD ASSIGNMENTS (10% of total grade)

Throughout the semester the instructor will be posting assignments on Blackboard.  These assignments could be a news article about the design, marketing or production of fashion, or an online discussion with someone in the fashion industry.  As assignments are posted the instructor will email students to let them know.  They will be responsible for reading the article and taking a short quiz or logging onto the discussion board and participating in the topic.

 

If students would like to earn 10 points extra credit they can submit an article on fashion that I can post and is topical to what we are studying and then the class can take a short quiz over it or we will open up a discussion board to discuss it.

 

 

FINAL GRADING SCALE:  90-100 = A, 80 – 89 = B, 70 – 79 = C, 60-69 = D, Below 60 = F.

 

DEPT POLICIES, SCANS. etc.  CAN BE FOUND AT:  http://www2.austincc.edu/mkt

COURSE POLICIES:

Incomplete Grades:

Students are encouraged to complete this course successfully, therefore incomplete grades are rarely granted.  Past experience reflects students who do not complete the necessary work during the semester they are registered, will not complete the course even if additional time is given.  In these cases, the incomplete grade of an “I” becomes an “F” grade.  However, if a special situation exists, the instructor may grant the grade of an “I.”  To receive this temporary grade of “I”, the student must:

1.      have completed two exams with at least a “C” average and the written project.

2.      request the “I” grade in person to the instructor and complete the necessary ACC forms.

3.      complete the course by the end of the following semester.  Failure to complete the material in the allowed time will result in the “I” being changed to a grade of “F”.

                        

Scholastic Dishonesty Policy:  “Acts prohibited by the college for which discipline may be administered include scholastic dishonesty, including but not limited to cheating on an exam or quiz, plagiarizing, and unauthorized collaboration with another in preparing outside work.  Academic work submitted by students shall be the result of their thought, research or self-expression.  Academic work is defined as, but not limited to test, quizzes, whether taken electronically or on paper:  projects, either individual or group:  classroom presentations and homework”  (see Student Handbook).

Student with Disabilities Policy:  “Each ACC campus offers support services for students with documented physical or psychological disabilities.  Students with disabilities must request reasonable accommodations through the office for students with disabilities on the campus where they expect to take the majority of their classes.  Students are encouraged to do this three weeks prior to the start of the semester.”

(see Student Handbook)

Freedom of Expression Policy:  “Each student is strongly encouraged to participate in class.  In any classroom situation that includes discussion and critical thinking, there are bound to be many differing viewpoints.  These differences enhance the learning experience and create an atmosphere where students and instructors alike will be encouraged to think and learn.  On sensitive and volatile topics, students may sometimes disagree not only with each other but also with the instructor.  It is expected that faculty and students will respect the views of others when expressed in classroom discussions”

RULE OF THREE:  Per state law, effective spring 2006 any student taking a class for the third time or more may be charged an additional per credit hour unless exempted. We call it the Rule of Three.

The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has mandated that all publicly funded higher-education institutions will not receive funding for courses a student takes for the third time or more. Without the state funding for those affected classes, ACC will charge additional tuition to pay for the cost of the class. The new “Rule of Three” tuition costs will not apply to developmental courses, Continuing Education courses, special-studies courses in which the content changes each time, or other select courses. For additional information go to http://www.austincc.edu/admiss/ruleofthree/

Students affected by this new policy should note the following:

  • This policy affects class enrollments beginning with the fall 2002 semester (Aug. 2002).
  • Financial aid may be used to cover the additional tuition charge.
  • If you are taking a class for the second time and are considering a third attempt in the future, consult with your instructor and/or advisor. ACC is here to help you succeed.
  • Appeals for waivers will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the relevant Dean of Student Servicesat each campus.

The Texas Coordinating Board requires an additional student contact with the instructor.  The student will be responsible to contact the instructor in person, by phone, or by email during the semester.

 

 

CHAPTER OBJECTIVES:  Use these, along with terms and review questions at the end of each chapter, as well as charts and diagrams in the chapters to study for the exams.

 
 
CHAPTER 1 - The Evolution of Fashion

1.      understand the evolution of fashion and some of the factors that played a role in its development.

2.      note the impact of the industrial revolution on the fashion industry.

3.      describe the role of unionization in the garment industry.

4.      describe the various components of the fashion industry.

CHAPTER 2 - Fashions 1900 to the Present

1.      describe important historical events of the 20thcentury and how they influenced fashion.

2.      describe the fashion highlights for men/women of the 20thcentury

3.      list important designers in the 20thcentury and their influences on fashion.

4.      be familiar with some of the retro looks that surfaced in the 1990’s and their sources.

CHAPTER 3 - The Powerful Consumer

1.      understand the terms demographics and psychographics.

2.      describe the different buying motives of emotional and rational purchasers.

3.      list the categories of consumers by social classes and explain their differences.

4.      differentiate between observation and questionnaire methods for consumer research.

5.      describe how focus groups help businesses learn about their consumer wants and needs.

6.      describe some of the legislation that has been enacted by the federal government for the protection of the consumer.

 

CHAPTER 4 – The Multicultural Consumer and Fashion

1.       understand the importance of the three major ethnic minorities in the

          United States to retailers.

2.      describe how demographic trends will affect the retailing community in terms of the merchandise they will offer in their

          inventories.

3.      understand the buying power of African Americans, Asian Americans,

          and Hispanics.

4.      understand the growth potential of fashion products for ethnic markets.

5.      understand how retailers are approaching the multicultural markets to

         improve their sales positions.

6.      note the development of advertising programs that incorporate minority

         imagery.

7.      understand why foreign language sales associates are important to today’s retailers.

8.      understand how merchants are making purchase plans to ensure that their minority base is being satisfactorily served.

 

CHAPTER 5 – Ever-Changing Fashion and Its Acceptance

1.      define terms that comprise the language of the trade.

2.      describe the different stages of the fashion cycle.

3.      discuss the influences on the fashion industry created by individuals/groups.

4.      understand the practices of copying and adapting fashion.

CHAPTER 6 – Fashion in the Global Marketplace

1.      understand how governmental legislation affects the importation of merchandise.

2.      understand the relationship of governmental trade pacts to the fashion industry.

3.      understand why the US imposes quotas on imports.

4.      list the most influential international fashion centers and their significance to the industry.

5.      describe the selling arrangements in the industry that move goods from the producer to the retailer.

 

 

CHAPTER 7 – Careers in Fashion

 

1.      discuss employment opportunities in the various segments of the industry.

2.      describe the techniques for a successful job interview.

3.      understand how to prepare a resume and a cover letter.

CHAPTER 8 – The Textile Industry

1.      differentiate between natural and manufactured fibers.

2.      list the major fiber classifications and the advantages of each.

3.      describe the various dyeing and printing techniques used in the textile coloration and the advantages of each method.

4.      discuss the importance of the finishes that are applied to fabrics.

5.      list some of the methodology used by the industry in the marketing of textiles.

CHAPTER 9 – Furs and Leather

1.      know the changes in the consumer market for garments made of fur.

2.      list the stages involved in the processing of furs.

3.      differentiate between various techniques of fur construction.

4.      know the different types of fur.

5.      understand the necessity for the Fur Products Labeling Act of 1952.

6.      understand the process by which leather hides are transformed into usable materials.

7.      list the origins of leather and its uses.

 

CHAPTER 10 – Apparel:  Women’s, Men’s and Children’s

1.      list the major classifications of women’s wear.

2.      describe the various size ranges of women’s wear and their unique characteristics.

3.      discuss the seasons in women’s apparel and the importance of each in the industry.

4.      compare men’s wear before the 1950’s with today’s fashions.

5.      list where the major men’s wear markets are in the US.

6.      identify the various product classifications in menswear.

7.      discuss the effects of Fridaywear on  apparel.

8.      describe how children’s fashions have changed since the 1950’s.

 

CHAPTER 11 – Intimate Apparel

1.      discuss the evolution of women’s undergarments.

2.      identify the various products that comprise the intimate apparel market.

3.      know the internationally famous couturiers who designed intimate apparel.

4.      be familiar with the relationship between intimate apparel designs and ready-to-wear.

5.      know the fibers and fabrics used for intimate apparel.

6.      understand the manner in which intimate apparel is being marketed by

         manufacturers and retailers.

 

CHAPTER 12 – Fashion Accessories

1.      understand the importance of accessories to the fashion industry.

2.      differentiate between the functional and decorative importance of accessories.

3.      be familiar with the impact made on hosiery with the discovery of nylon and introduction of pantyhose.

4.      know the differences between costume and fine jewelry.

5.      know the differences between functional and decorative belts.

6.      understand why watches, previously just functional accessories, have taken on fashion importance.

 

CHAPTER 13 – Details and Trimmings

1.      discuss how details are used to differentiate one design from another.

2.      list five different details used in garment construction.

3.      understand the differences between details and trimmings.

4.      list six different trimmings used as apparel and accessory enhancements.

5.      differentiate between functional and decorative trimmings.

 

CHAPTER 14 – Cosmetics and Fragrances

1.      describe the history of cosmetics and fragrances.

2.      list some marketing innovations in the cosmetics industry.

3.      understand the importance of ethnic cosmetics.

4.      define private branding.

5.      list the various stages of marketing cosmetics and fragrances.

6.      describe the distribution of cosmetics.

 

CHAPTER 15 – Home Fashions

1.      describe the evolution in the home fashion industry starting with the mid-1880’s.

2.      list some early leaders whose design ideas changed the home fashions field.

3.      describe some important styles in home fashions.

4.      explain various products in the home fashions industry and their expanding markets.

5.      understand the role of apparel designers in the home fashion industry.

6.      discuss the changing retail scene for home fashions.

 

 

CHAPTER 16 – Fashion Forecasting for Designers and Manufacturers

1.      list the various ways the forecaster aids the designer, developer, and retailer.

2.      describe the process by which the forecasters make their predictions.

3.      explain why forecasting must begin as early as 18 months prior to selling season.

4.      describe why fiber producers use fashion shows as a part of their campaigns.

 

CHAPTER 17 – Elements & Principles of Design for Developing a Fashion Collection

1.      describe the elements and principles of design on which apparel and home fashions are based.

2.      be familiar with the various color harmonies available to designers.

3.      understand the individual stages of developing a line or collection.

4.      describe the typical timetable that begins with a concept and ends with delivery to the retailer.

 

CHAPTER 18 – Apparel and Accessories Manufacturing

1.      understand the production costs for women’s, men’s and children’s apparel.

2.      describe various production alternatives available to the apparel industry.

3.      understand how piece goods are ordered by the manufacturer.

4.      define the stages of apparel production.

5.      list the techniques employed in the manufacture of footwear.

6.      list some of the manufacturing techniques used in fine and costume jewelry.

7.      list the four major parts of gloves and how they are assembled.

8.      describe the stages used in production of handbags.

9.      understand the benefits of quick response.

 

CHAPTER 19 – Outsourcing Fashion Design, Production, and Management

1.   understand why cultural awareness is necessary for success in business abroad.

2.   know how to properly dress for business meetings in foreign countries.

3.   understand the advantages and disadvantages of outsourcing.

4.   understand how workforce displacement may affect the economy in the United States.

5.   understand why local customs can affect production and delivery of merchandise.

6.   understand the importance of the proximity of fabricating materials.

7.   describe the use of domestic outsourcing.

8.  know the major centers for overseas outsourcing.

     

CHAPTER 20 – Resident Buying Offices and Other Fashion Information Sources for Retailers

1.      define resident buying office and commissionaire.

2.      describe how a private office is different from an independent office.

3.      list the services resident buying offices provide to their clients.

4.      understand the roles that trade associations and publications play in the industry.

5.      discuss the importance of trade exposition to designers and manufacturers.

 

CHAPTER 21 – The Fashion Retailer

1.      differentiate between flagship, branch and spin-off stores.

2.      describe reasons why off-price retailers sell at lower prices, but achieve high markups.

3.      discuss why manufacturers have opened their own retail outlets.

4.      list the different ways in which retailers are using the Internet to promote sales of their products.

5.      list five services that large fashion operations offer to customers.

6.      describe the various participants in the merchandise selection processes at most department stores.

 

CHAPTER 22 – Advertising, Special Events, Publicity, and Visual Merchandising

1.      describe some of the promotional methods used in the industry.

2.      know how manufacturers and retailers approach advertising.

3.      describe how designers, manufacturers, and retailers use consumer publications.

4.      differentiate between promotional and institutional advertising.

5.      list the benefits of cooperative advertising to the manufacturer and retailer.

6.      describe five types of special events and how they help their sponsors.

7.      differentiate between advertising and publicity.

8.      describe the role of the visual merchandiser in promoting fashions. 

 

How to log into Blackboard

 

 

 

ACC’s Blackboard server is located at http://acconline.austincc.edu/.

Students may also access Blackboard by selecting the “Blackboard/Online Courses” link from the student resources menu on the ACC website at http://www.austincc.edu/.

Once your browser has accessed the Blackboard site, click the "Login" button to begin using Blackboard. You will be prompted to enter a User ID and Password to access your courses.

 

  • Your User ID
    Enter your ACCeID and ACCeID Password in the provided boxes, and then click the "Login" button.

 

After you have entered your ACCeID and Password, click the Login button one time to access Blackboard.


Once you have logged into Blackboard
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ACC’s Blackboard support website is located at http://irt.austincc.edu/blackboard/.
Visit this site to find more information on the following: FAQs, help topics, user’s guide, browser requirements, and downloadable plug-ins. 

 

 


Optionally, you may also access your courses by clicking the "Courses" tab along the top navigation bar.


To end your Blackboard session
Closing your Internet browser will NOT end your Blackboard session.
In order to completely close your Blackboard session, you will need to click the Logout button located in the top right-hand corner of your screen.

Blackboard support
ACC’s Blackboard support web site is located at http://itdl.austincc.edu/blackboard/. Visit this site to find more information on the following: FAQs, help topics, user’s guide, browser requirements, and downloadable plug-ins.

 

What is Online Services?
Online Services provides students with web-based access to ACC’s student registration system. For more information, please see the Online Services FAQ at: https://onlineserv.austincc.edu/datatel/openweb/wafaq.html.

 

  

Throughout the semester the instructor will be posting assignments on Blackboard.  These assignments could be a news article about the design, marketing or production of fashion, or an online discussion with someone in the fashion industry.  As assignments are posted the instructor will email students to let them know.  They will be responsible for reading the article and taking a short quiz or logging onto the discussion board and participating in the topic. 

See Chapter Objectives listed in syllabus above.

To acquaint the student with the fundamentals of fashion and basic principles that govern all fashion movement and change.

 

1.      To learn basic fashion terminology, and to understand, define and grasp key terms, principles, concepts and theories involved in course coverage.

 

2.      To explore the manner in which economic, sociological and psychological factors influence fashion demand.

 

3.      To understand the roles and responsibilities of designers, manufacturers, and retailers.

 

4.      To acquaint the student with the history and development, organization, and operation merchandising and marketing activities and trends of industries engaged in producing and marketing fashion.

 

5.      To explore the impact of fashion merchandising on our everyday lives, and be able to identify trends, recognize leaders, and industry momentum as it effects individual fashion decisions.

  

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