Teach me how to dress fashionably

Teach me how to dress fashionably
  • She shook her head.

  • Even so, she had accepted it in her mind to a degree.

  • I only know that I sat in my mother's lap or clung to her dress as she went about her household duties.

  • The same evening that the prince gave his instructions to Alpatych, Dessalles, having asked to see Princess Mary, told her that, as the prince was not very well and was taking no steps to secure his safety, though from Prince Andrew's letter it was evident that to remain at Bald Hills might be dangerous, he respectfully advised her to send a letter by Alpatych to the Provincial Governor at Smolensk, asking him to let her know the state of affairs and the extent of the danger to which Bald Hills was exposed.

  • The impulse gone, I fell down and cried for her to take me up in her arms.

  • Carmen brushed them away and returned to her prayer.

  • His mother shook her head and said: No, Benjamin.

  • Maybe he thought she would change her mind, but it wasn't going to happen.

  • When Dorothy gently touched her nose and ears and lips they seemed to be well and delicately formed.

  • Her father is very rich and stingy.

  • The beautiful creature passed her hands over her eyes an instant, tucked in a stray lock of hair that had become disarranged, and after a look around the garden made those present a gracious bow and said, in a sweet but even toned voice:

  • Then she happened to remember that in a corner of her suit-case were one or two crackers that were left over from her luncheon on the train, and she went to the buggy and brought them.

  • "The Princess is lovely to look at," continued Dorothy, thoughtfully; "but I don't care much for her, after all.

  • She lay hidden among some rocks, and nothing could make her stir.

  • If someone notices that she gets a headache when she eats MSG—or artichokes, or grasshoppers—that first-person, anecdotal experience will shape her nutritional philosophy.

  • I always knew when she wished me to bring her something, and I would run upstairs or anywhere else she indicated.

  • Did Alex think of her that way?

  • "I will fetch her out," said Israel Putnam.

  • Anna Pavlovna Scherer on the contrary, despite her forty years, overflowed with animation and impulsiveness.

  • They saw the mother robin flying about, and crying to her mate.

  • "We don't know," was the answer, "but we saw her tracks down there by the brook.

  • In fact, let's say his own mother considered donating the portrait he painted of her to Goodwill but decided not to because "the poor have enough problems already."

  • Indeed, I owe to her loving wisdom all that was bright and good in my long night.

  • New England can hire all the wise men in the world to come and teach her, and board them round the while, and not be provincial at all.

  • "Oh, I don't know," purred Eureka, smoothing her ruffled fur with her paw; "we didn't manage to hurt anybody, and nobody managed to hurt us."

  • His uncle had written her a letter saying:

  • This makes sense, so she spends her last 00 in savings to buy ads.

  • Jill hates the licorice ones and eats all her jelly beans except the licorice ones.

  • The last were not England's best men and women; only, perhaps, her best philanthropists.

  • And she smiled her ecstatic smile.

  • He reached her and turned, walking beside her as they started back up the hill to the house.

  • In the future, every single person will have at his or her disposal the sum total of the life experience of everyone alive.

  • Now, consider the child that lives off the interest payments of all the money her parents saved.

  • The nearest that I came to actual possession was when I bought the Hollowell place, and had begun to sort my seeds, and collected materials with which to make a wheelbarrow to carry it on or off with; but before the owner gave me a deed of it, his wife--every man has such a wife--changed her mind and wished to keep it, and he offered me ten dollars to release him.

  • He's done her to death.

  • Eureka rubbed her paw on her face and said in her soft, purring voice:

  • The little man looked at her closely and then took both the maiden's hands in his and shook them cordially.

  • "The criminal who now sits before the court licking her paws," resumed the Woggle-Bug, "has long desired to unlawfully eat the fat piglet, which was no bigger than a mouse.

  • After that Princess Mary did not see her father for a whole week.

  • You plotted against me, you lied to Prince Andrew about my relations with that Frenchwoman and made me quarrel with him, but you see I need neither her nor you!

  • Dessalles looked in amazement at the prince, who was talking of the Niemen when the enemy was already at the Dnieper, but Princess Mary, forgetting the geographical position of the Niemen, thought that what her father was saying was correct.

  • Princess Mary saw Dessalles' embarrassed and astonished look fixed on her father, noticed his silence, and was struck by the fact that her father had forgotten his son's letter on the drawing-room table; but she was not only afraid to speak of it and ask Dessalles the reason of his confusion and silence, but was afraid even to think about it.

  • She gave it to him and, unpleasant as it was to her to do so, ventured to ask him what her father was doing.

  • Ferapontov came out after her, but on seeing Alpatych adjusted his waistcoat, smoothed his hair, yawned, and followed Alpatych into the opposite room.

  • Alex had provided the money to remodel the home, but insisted that it stay in her name only.

  • Her heart was starting to flutter.

  • A sudden gust of wind circled them and whispered words in her mind.

  • She shook her head to clear it.

  • Dark eyes studied her intently.

  • She pushed the thought from her mind and turned to him.

  • The conductor helped her off the car and then the engineer started his train again, so that it puffed and groaned and moved slowly away up the track.

  • She set down the bird-cage and poked the boy with her parasol.

  • Jumping out of the buggy he put Dorothy's suit-case under the seat and her bird-cage on the floor in front.

  • Next minute there was a roar and a sharp crash, and at her side Dorothy saw the ground open in a wide crack and then come together again.

  • When Dorothy recovered her senses they were still falling, but not so fast.

  • Also, turning her head, she found that she could see the boy beside her, who had until now remained as still and silent as she herself.

  • With this thought in mind the girl took heart and leaned her head over the side of the buggy to see where the strange light was coming from.

  • The central and largest one was white, and reminded her of the sun.

  • Dorothy had a green streak through the center of her face where the blue and yellow lights came together, and her appearance seemed to add to his fright.

  • It's this queer light that gives her that color.

  • "Yes; but it's lots of fun, if it IS strange," remarked the small voice of the kitten, and Dorothy turned to find her pet walking in the air a foot or so away from the edge of the roof.

  • Dorothy was surprised to find how patient the people were, for her own little heart was beating rapidly with excitement.

  • A balloon meant to her some other arrival from the surface of the earth, and she hoped it would be some one able to assist her and Zeb out of their difficulties.

  • The little man looked toward her and seemed as much surprised as she was.

  • The maiden's gown was soft as satin and fell about her in ample folds, while dainty lace-like traceries trimmed the bodice and sleeves.

  • Her poise expressed both dignity and grace.

  • The children, feeling sad and despondent, were about to follow him when the Wizard touched Dorothy softly on her shoulder.

  • Let's pick her while we have the chance, before the man with the star comes back.

  • "Pull!" cried Dorothy, and as they did so the royal lady leaned toward them and the stems snapped and separated from her feet.

  • She was not at all heavy, so the Wizard and Dorothy managed to lift her gently to the ground.

  • "We salute your Royal Highness!" cried the Wizard, kneeling and kissing her hand.

  • The people of Mangaboo now formed themselves into a procession and marched toward the glass city to escort their new ruler to her palace and to perform those ceremonies proper to the occasion.

  • Eureka stuck up her nose at such food, but the tiny piglets squealed delightedly at the sight of the crackers and ate them up in a jiffy.

  • Just then they heard the big voice of Jim the cab-horse calling to them, and going to the doorway leading to the dome they found the Princess and a throng of her people had entered the House of the Sorcerer.

  • The Mangaboos saw her escape, and several of them caught up their thorns and gave chase, mounting through the air after her.

  • There she entered in at Dorothy's window in the dome and aroused her from her sleep.

  • A peal of merry laughter answered her, and the knives and forks fell to the plates with a clatter.

  • "Surely," the woman answered, repeating her low, rippling laughter.

  • Dorothy laughed and stretched out her hands.

  • The girl's hair was soft and fluffy and her skin as smooth as satin.

  • To her surprise an unseen hand clutched her and held her suspended in the air.

  • "Yes, dear," her mistress replied; "there are people living in this house, although we cannot see them.

  • Once a little fish swam too near the surface, and the kitten grabbed it in her mouth and ate it up as quick as a wink; but Dorothy cautioned her to be careful what she ate in this valley of enchantments, and no more fishes were careless enough to swim within reach.

  • It did her good to see how the braided man's eyes sparkled when he received this treasure.

  • Dorothy must take her parasol and open it suddenly when the wooden folks attack her.

  • "What an awful fight!" said Dorothy, catching her breath in little gasps.

  • She's a friend of mine, for I met her in the Land of Ev, not long ago, and went to Oz with her.

  • "Do you mean that Princess Ozma will see this cave in her enchanted picture, and see all of us here, and what we are doing?" demanded Zeb.

  • You're sure to like Billina, when you know her, asserted Dorothy.

  • One moment Dorothy sat beside them with the kitten in her lap, and a moment later the horse, the piglets, the Wizard and the boy were all that remained in the underground prison.

  • "I believe we will soon follow her," announced the Wizard, in a tone of great relief; "for I know something about the magic of the fairyland that is called the Land of Oz.

  • Many years before you came here this Land was united under one Ruler, as it is now, and the Ruler's name was always 'Oz,' which means in our language 'Great and Good'; or, if the Ruler happened to be a woman, her name was always 'Ozma.'

  • But I escaped from her and am now the Ruler of my people.

  • I have sent messengers to summon all of Dorothy's old friends to meet her and give her welcome, and they ought to arrive very soon, now.

  • But Ozma soon conquered her, with the help of Glinda the Good, and after that I went to live with Nick Chopper, the Tin Woodman.

  • Dorothy sprang forward and caught the fluffy fowl in her arms, uttering at the same time a glad cry.

  • Around Billina's neck was a string of beautiful pearls, and on her legs were bracelets of emeralds.

  • These royal beasts are both warm friends of little Dorothy and have come to the Emerald City this morning to welcome her to our fairyland.

  • But here comes Ozma; so I'd better hush up, for the Princess doesn't like me to chatter since she changed her name from Tip to Ozma.

  • After breakfast Ozma announced that she had ordered a holiday to be observed throughout the Emerald City, in honor of her visitors.

  • Just behind the royal standard-bearers came the Princess Ozma in her royal chariot, which was of gold encrusted with emeralds and diamonds set in exquisite designs.

  • There was a beautiful canopy for Ozma and her guests to sit under and watch the people run races and jump and wrestle.

  • Jellia at once departed on the errand, and she was gone so long that they had almost forgotten her mission when the green robed maiden returned with a troubled face.

  • So Dorothy ran to her room and found the kitten under the bed.

  • So, if you are innocent, Eureka, you must tell the Princess how you came to be in her room, and what has become of the piglet.

  • Carry this cat away to prison, and keep her in safe confinement until she is tried by law for the crime of murder.

  • Princess Ozma, dressed in her most splendid robes of state, sat in the magnificent emerald throne, with her jewelled sceptre in her hand and her sparkling coronet upon her fair brow.

  • Behind her throne stood the twenty-eight officers of her army and many officials of the royal household.

  • At her right sat the queerly assorted Jury--animals, animated dummies and people--all gravely prepared to listen to what was said.

  • "Let the Public Accuser continue," called Ozma from her throne, "and I pray you do not interrupt him."

  • And finally she made a wicked plan to satisfy her depraved appetite for pork.

  • Look at the kitten's intelligent eyes;" (here Eureka closed her eyes sleepily) "gaze at her smiling countenance!"

  • (Here Eureka bared her sharp claws and scratched at the bars of the cage.)

  • As the Princess held the white piglet in her arms and stroked its soft hair she said: Let Eureka out of the cage, for she is no longer a prisoner, but our good friend.

  • When Ozma went away she closed the door and left her pet on the table.

  • When he returned the Princess looked down the narrow neck of the big ornament and discovered her lost piglet, just as Eureka had said she would.

  • Then the crowd cheered lustily and Dorothy hugged the kitten in her arms and told her how delighted she was to know that she was innocent.

  • The next evening after the trial the little girl begged Ozma to allow her to look in the enchanted picture, and the Princess readily consented.

  • Then Dorothy wound up Tik-tok and he danced a jig to amuse the company, after which the Yellow Hen related some of her adventures with the Nome King in the Land of Ev.

  • Dorothy held Eureka in her arms and bade her friends a fond good-bye.

  • "Greeting her uncle and aunt in Kansas, by this time," returned Ozma, with a smile.

  • How proud mamma will be of her brave boy!

  • Then he told her all that had happened.

  • "Samuel Stark saw her the other morning," said Tanner.

  • The servant complained to her master.

  • He saw them rolling down her cheeks.

  • He could not bear to see her grief.

  • The queen was standing quite near to it with the two wreaths still in her hands.

  • Not one of the bees so much as looked at those in her left hand.

  • "Yes, mother," he said, "I will watch her every minute.

  • The baby was asleep in her cradle, and he must not make a noise and waken her.

  • Here was her round head, covered with pretty curls.

  • Here was her mouth.

  • Here were her eyes, and here her dainty ears.

  • Here was her fat little neck.

  • Here were her wonderful hands.

  • He did not hear her soft breathing as she stood over him and watched him finish the wonderful drawing.

  • The good woman was so overjoyed that she caught him in her arms and kissed him.

  • "It looks just like her, doesn't it?" she said.

  • Suddenly, to his great joy he saw little Lucy Martin lean over her desk and whisper to the girl in front of her.

  • Everybody loved her, and this was the first time she had whispered that day.

  • With tears in her eyes she went out and stood in the whisperer's place.

  • The boys looked at her and wondered if the master would really be as good as his word.

  • Little Lucy Martin saw him through her tears, but said nothing.

  • I could not bear to see her punished.

  • His mother unlocked her cabinet and took the precious volume from its place of safe keeping.

  • "Bravo! bravo!" cried his mother, her eyes sparkling with pride.

  • Some of the Greeks said that an eagle caught him in her beak and carried him unharmed to the bottom.

  • The ship was driven far out of her course.

  • Once when a boy gave him a pair of doves which he had snared, St. Francis had a nest made for them, and the mother bird laid her eggs in it.

  • Each one told of some plan by which to keep out of her way.

  • You may send the gold pieces to your mother with my compliments; and tell her that the king will take care of both her and you.

  • So she called her two sons.

  • The next day Robert's aunt heard a great pounding and sawing in her woodshed.

  • So she called her clerk, who was a scholar, and bade him write the song, word for word, as it came from Caedmon's lips.

  • Your own mother, and no time to attend to her child?

  • We must let her know that you are safe.

  • I am sorry if I have given her trouble.

  • Another friend tells her either member of the couple should be able to instantly remove the couple page when the relationship goes sour.

  • A leader can only afford to let her people go hungry when she doesn't answer to them.

  • In the United States, de Tocqueville's voluntary associations still do the job and anyone willing to make her way to a church or food pantry and say she is hungry will not leave empty handed.

  • Slurring her words, she says, I'm, I'm gonna drive.

  • It gives everyone a chance to make her case and be heard.

  • Macbeth is the story of a ruthless wife, Lady Macbeth, who persuades her husband to murder the king and take his throne.

  • Martha Washington understood my signs, and I seldom had any difficulty in making her do just as I wished.

  • The guinea-fowl likes to hide her nest in out-of-the-way places, and it was one of my greatest delights to hunt for the eggs in the long grass.

  • When we were fortunate enough to find a nest I never allowed her to carry the eggs home, making her understand by emphatic signs that she might fall and break them.

  • One was black as ebony, with little bunches of fuzzy hair tied with shoestrings sticking out all over her head like corkscrews.

  • I tried hard to teach her my sign language, but she was dull and inattentive.

  • After my teacher, Miss Sullivan, came to me, I sought an early opportunity to lock her in her room.

  • She sat in my mother's lap constantly, where I used to sit, and seemed to take up all her care and time.

  • If my mother happened to be near I crept into her arms, too miserable even to remember the cause of the tempest.

  • I pulled two beads off and indicated to her that I wanted her to sew them on my doll.

  • She raised my hand to her eyes in a questioning way, and I nodded energetically.

  • The morning after my teacher came she led me into her room and gave me a doll.

  • I became impatient at her repeated attempts and, seizing the new doll, I dashed it upon the floor.

  • I stood still, my whole attention fixed upon the motions of her fingers.

  • I clung to her, trembling with joy to feel the earth under my feet once more.

  • I had learned a new lesson--that nature "wages open war against her children, and under softest touch hides treacherous claws."

  • Her words puzzled me very much because I did not then understand anything unless I touched it.

  • I smelt the violets in her hand and asked, half in words, half in signs, a question which meant, "Is love the sweetness of flowers?"

  • But Miss Sullivan shook her head, and I was greatly puzzled and disappointed.

  • It was my teacher's genius, her quick sympathy, her loving tact which made the first years of my education so beautiful.

  • How much of my delight in all beautiful things is innate, and how much is due to her influence, I can never tell.

  • I feel that her being is inseparable from my own, and that the footsteps of my life are in hers.

  • All the best of me belongs to her--there is not a talent, or an aspiration or a joy in me that has not been awakened by her loving touch.

  • She was covered with dirt – the remains of mud pies I had compelled her to eat, although she had never shown any special liking for them.

  • The laundress at the Perkins Institution secretly carried her off to give her a bath.

  • When I next saw her she was a formless heap of cotton, which I should not have recognized at all except for the two bead eyes which looked out at me reproachfully.

  • Suddenly Mildred pointed with her little hand and exclaimed, "There's the trestle!"

  • Shrunk and cold, As if her veins were sapless and old, And she rose up decrepitly For a last dim look at earth and sea.

  • I used to sit in my mother's lap all day long and keep my hands on her face because it amused me to feel the motions of her lips; and I moved my lips, too, although I had forgotten what talking was.

  • Miss Fuller's method was this: she passed my hand lightly over her face, and let me feel the position of her tongue and lips when she made a sound.

  • I could not be despondent while I anticipated the delight of talking to my mother and reading her responses from her lips.

  • My eyes fill with tears now as I think how my mother pressed me close to her, speechless and trembling with delight, taking in every syllable that I spoke, while little Mildred seized my free hand and kissed it and danced, and my father expressed his pride and affection in a big silence.

  • Something I said made her think she detected in my words a confession that I did remember Miss Canby's story of "The Frost Fairies," and she laid her conclusions before Mr. Anagnos, although I had told her most emphatically that she was mistaken.

  • I studied it with Madame Olivier, a French lady who did not know the manual alphabet, and who was obliged to give her instruction orally.

  • I could not read her lips easily; so my progress was much slower than in German.

  • No one realized more fully than dear Frau Grote how slow and inadequate her spelling was.

  • When her fingers were too tired to spell another word, I had for the first time a keen sense of my deprivations.

  • Could there be anything more dramatic than the scene in which Esther stands before her wicked lord?

  • She knows her life is in his hands; there is no one to protect her from his wrath.

  • Ruth is so loyal and gentle-hearted, we cannot help loving her, as she stands with the reapers amid the waving corn.

  • Her beautiful, unselfish spirit shines out like a bright star in the night of a dark and cruel age.

  • Elsie Leslie, the little actress, was in Boston, and Miss Sullivan took me to see her in "The Prince and the Pauper."

  • After the play I was permitted to go behind the scenes and meet her in her royal costume.

  • I was only just learning to speak, and had previously repeated her name until I could say it perfectly.

  • One is Mrs. William Thaw, of Pittsburgh, whom I have often visited in her home, Lyndhurst.

  • She is always doing something to make some one happy, and her generosity and wise counsel have never failed my teacher and me in all the years we have known her.

  • Helen Keller's letters are important, not only as a supplementary story of her life, but as a demonstration of her growth in thought and expression--the growth which in itself has made her distinguished.

  • The best passages are those in which she talks about herself, and gives her world in terms of her experience of it.

  • One cause for the excellence of her letters is the great number of them.

  • They are the exercises which have trained her to write.

  • So these selections from Miss Keller's correspondence are made with two purposes--to show her development and to preserve the most entertaining and significant passages from several hundred letters.

  • Three months and a half after the first word was spelled into her hand, she wrote in pencil this letter

  • Twenty-five days later, while she was on a short visit away from home, she wrote to her mother.

  • A few weeks later her style is more nearly correct and freer in movement.

  • Her name is Allie.

  • By the beginning of the next year her idioms are firmer.

  • I saw Miss Betty and her scholars.

  • Mrs. Hopkins did send me lovely ring, I do love her and little blind girls.

  • Teacher did tear her dress.

  • The next two letters mention her visit in January to her relatives in Memphis, Tennessee.

  • Her name is Adeline Keller.

  • She can shut her eyes and bend her arms and sit down and stand up straight.

  • Nancy was a bad child when I went to Memphis she cried loud, I whipped her with a stick.

  • In this account of the picnic we get an illuminating glimpse of Miss Sullivan's skill in teaching her pupil during play hours.

  • Nancy is sick again, new teeth do make her ill.

  • She likes to sit in my little rocking-chair and put her kitty to sleep.

  • Her eyes are very big and blue, and her cheeks are soft and round and rosy and her hair is very bright and golden.

  • Her eyes are very big and blue, and her cheeks are soft and round and rosy and her hair is very bright and golden.

  • I hope she will not eat too many of the delicious fruit for they will make her very ill.

  • Pony's name was Mollie and I had a nice ride on her back; I was not afraid, I hope my uncle will get me a dear little pony and a little cart very soon.

  • Chinese nurse came to see me, her name was Asu.

  • Her visit to Plymouth was in July.

  • This letter, written three months later, shows how well she remembered her first lesson in history.

  • It was in this way that she learned to use correctly words of sound and vision which express ideas outside of her experience.

  • Teacher is writing letters to her friends.

  • Sometimes she tries to spell very short words on her small [fingers] but she is too young to remember hard words.

  • When she is older I will teach her many things if she is patient and obedient.

  • A lady brought her to me from Paris.

  • Like a good many of Helen Keller's early letters, this to her French teacher is her re-phrasing of a story.

  • She wept because her brother teased her very much.

  • Already she began to see quite plainly the little elves in their tall pointed hats, dancing down the dusky alleys, and peeping from between the bushes, and they seemed to come nearer and nearer; and she stretched her hands up towards the tree in which the doll sat and they laughed, and pointed their fingers at her.

  • Her little brown mate has flown away with the other birds; but Annie is not sad, for she likes to stay with me.

  • Sometimes, when mother does not know it, she goes out into the vineyard, and gets her apron full of delicious grapes.

  • I think she would like to put her two soft arms around your neck and hug you.

  • Teacher sends her love too.

  • I should like to call her Lioness, for your dog.

  • I think she will laugh when I tell her she is a vertebrate, a mammal, a quadruped; and I shall be very sorry to tell her that she belongs to the order Carnivora.

  • Her little girls are named Violet and May.

  • Give her many kisses for me.

  • If it is too warm in Tuscumbia for little sister to wear her pretty mittens, she can keep them because her sister made them for her.

  • Tell her to shake him, and then he will blow his trumpet.

  • Her throat was very sore and the doctor thought she would have to go away to the hospital, but she is better now.

  • If my little sister comes to Boston next June, will you let me bring her to see you?

  • I can hardly wait for June to come I am so eager to speak to her and to my precious little sister.

  • And I would keep my little hand on her face all the while, because it amused me to feel her face and lips move when she talked with people.

  • This was the first home-going after she had learned to "talk with her mouth."

  • Teacher sends you her kind remembrances, and father and mother also send their regards.

  • Everybody will feel an interest in dear little Helen; everybody will want to do something for her; and, if she becomes an ancient, gray-haired woman, she is still sure of being thoughtfully cared for.

  • I hope the great ocean will love the new Helen, and let her sail over its blue waves peacefully.

  • And my darling little sister, how I wish I could give her a hundred kisses!

  • Teacher is well and sends her kind remembrance to you.

  • She began to solicit contributions from her friends, and saved her pennies.

  • Once the Earl of Meath came to see me, and he told me that the queen was much beloved by her people, because of her gentleness and wisdom.

  • Tomorrow April will hide her tears and blushes beneath the flowers of lovely May.

  • Teacher sends her kind remembrances, and I send you with my picture my dear love.

  • When the Perkins Institution closed in June, Helen and her teacher went south to Tuscumbia, where they remained until December.

  • An analysis of the case has been made elsewhere, and Miss Keller has written her account of it.

  • But lo! the lovely maiden only smiles more sweetly, and breathes upon the icy battlements of her enemies, and in a moment they vanish, and the glad Earth gives her a royal welcome.

  • Please give her my love.

  • Please give your dear aunt teacher's and my love and tell her that we enjoyed our little visit very much indeed.

  • Teacher said yesterday, that perhaps Mrs. Spaulding would be willing to let us have her beautiful house, and [I] thought I would ask you about it.

  • Please give my love to Miss Derby and tell her that I hope she gave my sweetest love to Baby Ruth.

  • Please kiss your dear little baby for me, and tell her I have a little brother nearly sixteen months old.

  • Teacher's eyes have been hurting her so that she could not write to any one, and I have been trying to fulfil a promise which I made last summer.

  • In reading this letter about Niagara one should remember that Miss Keller knows distance and shape, and that the size of Niagara is within her experience after she has explored it, crossed the bridge and gone down in the elevator.

  • Especially important are such details as her feeling the rush of the water by putting her hand on the window.

  • Dr. Bell gave her a down pillow, which she held against her to increase the vibrations.

  • A lady seemed surprised that I loved flowers when I could not see their beautiful colors, and when I assured her I did love them, she said, "no doubt you feel the colors with your fingers."

  • Her visit to the World's Fair she described in a letter to Mr. John P. Spaulding, which was published in St. Nicholas, and is much like the following letter.

  • In a prefatory note which Miss Sullivan wrote for St. Nicholas, she says that people frequently said to her, "Helen sees more with her fingers than we do with our eyes."

  • The President of the Exposition gave her this letter:

  • Please favour her with every facility to examine the exhibits in the several Departments, and extend to her such other courtesies as may be possible.

  • The "singing lessons" were to strengthen her voice.

  • Liberty is a gigantic figure of a woman in Greek draperies, holding in her right hand a torch....

  • I was much disappointed not to see her, but I hope I shall have that pleasure some other time.

  • I thought her beauty angellic, and oh, what a clear, beautiful voice she had!

  • Sweet Rebecca, with her strong, brave spirit, and her pure, generous nature, was the only character which thoroughly won my admiration.

  • I read her lips almost exclusively, (she does not know the manual alphabet) and we get on quite well.

  • Teacher seems to feel benefitted by the change too; for she is already beginning to look like her dear old self.

  • But it is harder for Teacher than it is for me because the strain on her poor eyes is so great, and I cannot help worrying about them.

  • Then the interference of Mr. Gilman resulted in Mrs. Keller's withdrawing Miss Helen and her sister, Miss Mildred, from the school.

  • I ride with a divided skirt, and so does my teacher; but it would be easier for her to mount a man's wheel than for me; so, if it could be arranged to have the ladies' seat behind, I think it would be better....

  • Poor Teacher has had her hands full, attending to movers, and express-men, and all sorts of people.

  • She looked as if she had just risen from the foam of the sea, and her loveliness was like a strain of heavenly music.

  • I also saw poor Niobe with her youngest child clinging close to her while she implored the cruel goddess not to kill her last darling.

  • But it is most distressing to me to feel that she is sacrificing her sight for me.

  • Now her eyes are troubling her a great deal, and we all think she ought to be relieved, for a while, of every care and responsibility.

  • The other day, I met a deaf Norwegian gentleman, who knows Ragnhild Kaata and her teacher very well, and we had a very interesting conversation about her.

  • She reads the lips well, and if she cannot understand a phrase, her friends write it in her hand, and in this way she converses with strangers.

  • I do hope I shall see her sometime...

  • Her arguments seemed so wise and practical, that I could not but yield.

  • Her other dress is purple, trimmed with purple velvet, and the waist has a collar of cream lace.

  • TO MR. JOHN HITZ 14 Coolidge Ave., Cambridge, Nov. 26, 1900. ...--has already communicated with you in regard to her and my plan of establishing an institution for deaf and blind children.

  • Mrs. Hutton had already written to mother, asking her to telegraph if she was willing for me to have other advisers besides herself and Teacher.

  • This morning we received word that mother had given her consent to this arrangement.

  • Her name is Ruby Rice, and she is thirteen years old, I think.

  • Her sense of smell is wonderful.

  • Why, when she enters a store, she will go straight to the showcases, and she can also distinguish her own things.

  • Her parents are very anxious indeed to find a teacher for her.

  • Her name is Maud Scott, and she is six years old.

  • Miss Watkins, the lady who has charge of her wrote me a most interesting letter.

  • She said that Maud was born deaf and lost her sight when she was only three months old, and that when she went to the Institution a few weeks ago, she was quite helpless.

  • She could not even walk and had very little use of her hands.

  • When they tried to teach her to string beads, her little hands fell to her side.

  • I have written to her that when Maud learns to read, I shall have many stories to send her.

  • The latter wished to send her some books; but she could not find anything simple enough for her!

  • When the Indiana visited Halifax, we were invited to go on board, and she sent her own launch for us.

  • If he had not taken upon himself the responsibility of Laura Bridgman's education and led her out of the pit of Acheron back to her human inheritance, should I be a sophomore at Radcliffe College to-day--who can say?

  • What is remarkable in her career is already accomplished, and whatever she may do in the future will be but a relatively slight addition to the success which distinguishes her now.

  • But it is to be remembered that Miss Keller has written many things in her autobiography for the fun of writing them, and the disillusion, which the writer of the editorial took seriously, is in great part humorous.

  • I ought to apologize to the reader and to Miss Keller for presuming to say what her subject matter is worth, but one more explanation is necessary.

  • In her account of her early education Miss Keller is not giving a scientifically accurate record of her life, nor even of the important events.

  • She cannot know in detail how she was taught, and her memory of her childhood is in some cases an idealized memory of what she has learned later from her teacher and others.

  • That is why her teacher's records may be found to differ in some particulars from Miss Keller's account.

  • The way in which Miss Keller wrote her story shows, as nothing else can show, the difficulties she had to overcome.

  • When Miss Keller puts her work in typewritten form, she cannot refer to it again unless some one reads it to her by means of the manual alphabet.

  • Last July, when she had finished under great pressure of work her final chapter, she set to work to rewrite the whole story.

  • Her good friend, Mr. William Wade, had a complete braille copy made for her from the magazine proofs.

  • Her good friend, Mr. William Wade, had a complete braille copy made for her from the magazine proofs.

  • Then for the first time she had her whole manuscript under her finger at once.

  • She saw, too, that her story properly fell into short chapters and redivided it.

  • In rewriting the story, Miss Keller made corrections on separate pages on her braille machine.

  • Long corrections she wrote out on her typewriter, with catch-words to indicate where they belonged.

  • She sat running her finger over the braille manuscript, stopping now and then to refer to the braille notes on which she had indicated her corrections, all the time reading aloud to verify the manuscript.

  • The book is Miss Keller's and is final proof of her independent power.

  • The admiration with which the world has regarded her is more than justified by what she has done.

  • She seems to be more nervous than she really is, because she expresses more with her hands than do most English-speaking people.

  • When Miss Keller speaks, her face is animated and expresses all the modes of her thought--the expressions that make the features eloquent and give speech half its meaning.

  • When she is talking with an intimate friend, however, her hand goes quickly to her friend's face to see, as she says, "the twist of the mouth."

  • Her memory of people is remarkable.

  • Skill in the use of words and her habit of playing with them make her ready with mots and epigrams.

  • Some one asked her if she liked to study.

  • When she met Dr. Furness, the Shakespearean scholar, he warned her not to let the college professors tell her too many assumed facts about the life of Shakespeare; all we know, he said, is that Shakespeare was baptized, married, and died.

  • Mr. Joseph Jefferson was once explaining to Miss Keller what the bumps on her head meant.

  • It was this same perseverance that made her go to college.

  • But she was not satisfied until she had carried out her purpose and entered college.

  • Her life has been a series of attempts to do whatever other people do, and to do it as well.

  • Her success has been complete, for in trying to be like other people she has come most fully to be herself.

  • Her unwillingness to be beaten has developed her courage.

  • Her unwillingness to be beaten has developed her courage.

  • If it happens to be blue, and you tell her so triumphantly, she is likely to answer, Thank you.

  • Her whimsical and adventuresome spirit puts her so much on her mettle that she makes rather a poor subject for the psychological experimenter.

  • Her whimsical and adventuresome spirit puts her so much on her mettle that she makes rather a poor subject for the psychological experimenter.

  • When a psychologist asked her if Miss Keller spelled on her fingers in her sleep, Miss Sullivan replied that she did not think it worth while to sit up and watch, such matters were of so little consequence.

  • If others are aglow with music, a responding glow, caught sympathetically, shines in her face.

  • In the same way her response to music is in part sympathetic, although she enjoys it for its own sake.

  • Music probably can mean little to her but beat and pulsation.

  • Her enjoyment of music, however, is very genuine, for she has a tactile recognition of sound when the waves of air beat against her.

  • When the organ was played for her in St. Bartholomew's, the whole building shook with the great pedal notes, but that does not altogether account for what she felt and enjoyed.

  • The vibration of the air as the organ notes swelled made her sway in answer.

  • Sometimes she puts her hand on a singer's throat to feel the muscular thrill and contraction, and from this she gets genuine pleasure.

  • No one knows, however, just what her sensations are.

  • It is amusing to read in one of the magazines of 1895 that Miss Keller "has a just and intelligent appreciation of different composers from having literally felt their music, Schumann being her favourite."

  • Miss Keller's effort to reach out and meet other people on their own intellectual ground has kept her informed of daily affairs.

  • But every one who has met her has given his best ideas to her and she has taken them.

  • She reaches out and touches the leaves, and the world of growing things is hers, as truly as it is ours, to enjoy while she holds the leaves in her fingers and smells the blossoms, and to remember when the walk is done.

  • When she is in a new place, especially an interesting place like Niagara, whoever accompanies her--usually, of course, Miss Sullivan--is kept busy giving her an idea of visible details.

  • Miss Sullivan, who knows her pupil's mind, selects from the passing landscape essential elements, which give a certain clearness to Miss Keller's imagined view of an outer world that to our eyes is confused and overloaded with particulars.

  • If her companion does not give her enough details, Miss Keller asks questions until she has completed the view to her satisfaction.

  • She does not see with her eyes, but through the inner faculty to serve which eyes were given to us.

  • When she returns from a walk and tells some one about it, her descriptions are accurate and vivid.

  • A comparative experience drawn from written descriptions and from her teacher's words has kept her free from errors in her use of terms of sound and vision.

  • True, her view of life is highly coloured and full of poetic exaggeration; the universe, as she sees it, is no doubt a little better than it really is.

  • Many of the detached incidents and facts of our daily life pass around and over her unobserved; but she has enough detailed acquaintance with the world to keep her view of it from being essentially defective.

  • Most that she knows at first hand comes from her sense of touch.

  • She was slower than he expected her to be in identifying them by their relative weight and size.

  • Anything shallower than a half-inch bas-relief is a blank to her, so far as it expresses an idea of beauty.

  • Large statues, of which she can feel the sweep of line with her whole hand, she knows in their higher esthetic value.

  • It is, however, in her daily life that one can best measure the delicacy of her senses and her manual skill.

  • She gropes her way without much certainty in rooms where she is quite familiar.

  • She has practised no single constructive craft which would call for the use of her hands.

  • The only thing she does which requires skill with the hands is her work on the typewriter.

  • Her manuscripts seldom contain typographical errors when she hands them to Miss Sullivan to read.

  • Her typewriter has no special attachments.

  • Miss Keller's reading of the manual alphabet by her sense of touch seems to cause some perplexity.

  • Even people who know her fairly well have written in the magazines about Miss Sullivan's "mysterious telegraphic communications" with her pupil.

  • Miss Keller puts her fingers lightly over the hand of one who is talking to her and gets the words as rapidly as they can be spelled.

  • The time that one of Miss Keller's friends realizes most strongly that she is blind is when he comes on her suddenly in the dark and hears the rustle of her fingers across the page.

  • Miss Keller has a braille writer on which she keeps notes and writes letters to her blind friends.

  • Miss Keller does not as a rule read very fast, but she reads deliberately, not so much because she feels the words less quickly than we see then, as because it is one of her habits of mind to do things thoroughly and well.

  • When a passage interests her, or she needs to remember it for some future use, she flutters it off swiftly on the fingers of her right hand.

  • When she is walking up or down the hall or along the veranda, her hands go flying along beside her like a confusion of birds' wings.

  • For Miss Keller to spell a sentence in the manual alphabet impresses it on her mind just as we learn a thing from having heard it many times and can call back the memory of its sound.

  • Like every deaf or blind person, Miss Keller depends on her sense of smell to an unusual degree.

  • As her intellect grew she became less dependent on this sense.

  • This much is certain, she cannot have any sense that other people may not have, and the existence of a special sense is not evident to her or to any one who knows her.

  • Miss Keller is distinctly not a singular proof of occult and mysterious theories, and any attempt to explain her in that way fails to reckon with her normality.

  • Philosophers have tried to find out what was her conception of abstract ideas before she learned language.

  • She had no conception of God before she heard the word "God," as her comments very clearly show.

  • Her sense of time is excellent, but whether it would have developed as a special faculty cannot be known, for she has had a watch since she was seven years old.

  • No attempt is made by those around her either to preserve or to break her illusions.

  • Now that she has grown up, nobody thinks of being less frank with her than with any other intelligent young woman.

  • What her good friend, Charles Dudley Warner, wrote about her in Harper's Magazine in 1896 was true then, and it remains true now:

  • The world to her is what her own mind is.

  • Some time ago, when a policeman shot dead her dog, a dearly loved daily companion, she found in her forgiving heart no condemnation for the man; she only said, 'If he had only known what a good dog she was, he wouldn't have shot her.'

  • In consequence her mind is not only vigorous, but it is pure.

  • Yesterday I read to her the story of 'Macbeth,' as told by Charles and Mary Lamb.

  • Once when some one asked her to define "love," she replied, "Why, bless you, that is easy; it is what everybody feels for everybody else."

  • "Toleration," she said once, when she was visiting her friend Mrs. Laurence Hutton, "is the greatest gift of the mind; it requires the same effort of the brain that it takes to balance oneself on a bicycle."

  • Not all the attention that has been paid her since she was a child has made her take herself too seriously.

  • Then her teacher calls her an incorrigible little sermonizer, and she laughs at herself.

  • Often, however, her sober ideas are not to be laughed at, for her earnestness carries her listeners with her.

  • She means everything so thoroughly that her very quotations, her echoes from what she has read, are in truth original.

  • Her logic and her sympathy are in excellent balance.

  • Her logic and her sympathy are in excellent balance.

  • Her sympathy is of the swift and ministering sort which, fortunately, she has found so often in other people.

  • And her sympathies go further and shape her opinions on political and national movements.

  • When she was told of the surrender of the brave little people, her face clouded and she was silent a few minutes.

  • Both Mr. Gilman and Mr. Keith, the teachers who prepared her for college, were struck by her power of constructive reasoning; and she was excellent in pure mathematics, though she seems never to have enjoyed it much.

  • It is now sixty-five years since Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe knew that he had made his way through Laura Bridgman's fingers to her intelligence.

  • As head of the Perkins Institution for the Blind in Boston, he heard of Laura Bridgman and had her brought to the Institution on October 4, 1837.

  • At the age of twenty-six months scarlet fever left her without sight or hearing.

  • She also lost her sense of smell and taste.

  • He pasted raised labels on objects and made her fit the labels to the objects and the objects to the labels.

  • After the first year or two Dr. Howe did not teach Laura Bridgman himself, but gave her over to other teachers, who under his direction carried on the work of teaching her language.

  • Helen Keller became so rapidly a distinctive personality that she kept her teacher in a breathless race to meet the needs of her pupil, with no time or strength to make a scientific study.

  • Miss Sullivan knew at the beginning that Helen Keller would be more interesting and successful than Laura Bridgman, and she expresses in one of her letters the need of keeping notes.

  • But neither temperament nor training allowed her to make her pupil the object of any experiment or observation which did not help in the child's development.

  • When she first wrote from Tuscumbia to Mr. Michael Anagnos, Dr. Howes son-in-law and his successor as Director of the Perkins Institution, about her work with her pupil, the Boston papers began at once to publish exaggerated accounts of Helen Keller.

  • One paper has Helen demonstrating problems in geometry by means of her playing blocks.

  • For this report Miss Sullivan prepared, in reluctant compliance with the request of Mr. Anagnos, an account of her work.

  • This with the extracts from her letters, scattered through the report, is the first valid source of information about Helen Keller.

  • In a year after she first went to Helen Keller, Miss Sullivan found herself and her pupil the centre of a stupendous fiction.

  • Teachers of the deaf proved a priori that what Miss Sullivan had done could not be, and some discredit was reflected on her statements, because they were surrounded by the vague eloquence of Mr. Anagnos.

  • Although Miss Sullivan is still rather amused than distressed when some one, even one of her friends, makes mistakes in published articles about her and Miss Keller, still she sees that Miss Keller's book should include all the information that the teacher could at present furnish.

  • So she consented to the publication of extracts from letters which she wrote during the first year of her work with her pupil.

  • Many people have thought that any attempt to find the principles in her method would be nothing but a later theory superimposed on Miss Sullivan's work.

  • Very early in her life she became almost totally blind, and she entered the Perkins Institution October 7, 1880, when she was fourteen years old.

  • Later her sight was partially restored.

  • The only time she had to prepare herself for the work with her pupil was from August, 1886, when Captain Keller wrote, to February, 1887.

  • It must be remembered that Miss Sullivan had to solve her problems unaided by previous experience or the assistance of any other teacher.

  • Mr. Anagnos wrote in the report of the Perkins Institution, dated November 27, 1888: At my urgent request, Helen, accompanied by her mother and her teacher, came to the North in the last week of May, and spent several months with us as our guests....

  • We gladly allowed her to use freely our library of embossed books, our collection of stuffed animals, sea-shells, models of flowers and plants, and the rest of our apparatus for instructing the blind through the sense of touch.

  • But whether Helen stays at home or makes visits in other parts of the country, her education is always under the immediate direction and exclusive control of her teacher.

  • No one interferes with Miss Sullivan's plans, or shares in her tasks.

  • Some of her opinions Miss Sullivan would like to enlarge and revise.

  • That remains for her to do at another time.

  • The first letter is dated March 6, 1887, three days after her arrival in Tuscumbia.

  • Her mother interfered at this point and showed Helen by signs that she must not touch the bag.

  • Her face flushed, and when her mother attempted to take the bag from her, she grew very angry.

  • Her face flushed, and when her mother attempted to take the bag from her, she grew very angry.

  • I attracted her attention by showing her my watch and letting her hold it in her hand.

  • Friends had probably brought her candy in their bags, and she expected to find some in mine.

  • I made her understand, by pointing to a trunk in the hall and to myself and nodding my head, that I had a trunk, and then made the sign that she had used for eating, and nodded again.

  • She understood in a flash and ran downstairs to tell her mother, by means of emphatic signs, that there was some candy in a trunk for her.

  • She is large, strong, and ruddy, and as unrestrained in her movements as a young colt.

  • She has a fine head, and it is set on her shoulders just right.

  • Her face is hard to describe.

  • Her mouth is large and finely shaped.

  • She rarely smiles; indeed, I have seen her smile only once or twice since I came.

  • She is unresponsive and even impatient of caresses from any one except her mother.

  • She is very quick-tempered and wilful, and nobody, except her brother James, has attempted to control her.

  • I shall go rather slowly at first and try to win her love.

  • I shall not attempt to conquer her by force alone; but I shall insist on reasonable obedience from the start.

  • Her hands are in everything; but nothing holds her attention for long.

  • Her hands are in everything; but nothing holds her attention for long.

  • Dear child, her restless spirit gropes in the dark.

  • Her untaught, unsatisfied hands destroy whatever they touch because they do not know what else to do with things.

  • I thought it a good opportunity to teach her her first word.

  • Whenever anybody gives her anything, she points to it, then to herself, and nods her head.

  • Then I took the doll, meaning to give it back to her when she had made the letters; but she thought I meant to take it from her, and in an instant she was in a temper, and tried to seize the doll.

  • I shook my head and tried to form the letters with her fingers; but she got more and more angry.

  • I forced her into a chair and held her there until I was nearly exhausted.

  • Then it occurred to me that it was useless to continue the struggle--I must do something to turn the current of her thoughts.

  • I let her go, but refused to give up the doll.

  • Of course she wanted it and tried to take it; but I spelled the word again and patted her hand.

  • She made the letters rapidly, and I gave her the cake, which she ate in a great hurry, thinking, I suppose, that I might take it from her.

  • Then I showed her the doll and spelled the word again, holding the doll toward her as I held the cake.

  • Yesterday I gave her a sewing-card to do.

  • I made the first row of vertical lines and let her feel it and notice that there were several rows of little holes.

  • The two letters "c-a," you see, had reminded her of Fridays "lesson"--not that she had any idea that cake was the name of the thing, but it was simply a matter of association, I suppose.

  • She follows with her hands every motion you make, and she knew that I was looking for the doll.

  • I made the signs that she had used when she wished me to go for the cake, and pushed her toward the door.

  • She had not finished the cake she was eating, and I took it away, indicating that if she brought the doll I would give her back the cake.

  • She kept coming up behind me and putting her hand on the paper and into the ink-bottle.

  • These blots are her handiwork.

  • Finally I remembered the kindergarten beads, and set her to work stringing them.

  • I shook my head and took them all off and made her feel of the two wooden beads and the one glass bead.

  • I took them off and showed her that the two wooden ones must go on first, then the glass bead.

  • She tied the ends together when she had finished the string, and put the beads round her neck.

  • She puts her hands in our plates and helps herself, and when the dishes are passed, she grabs them and takes out whatever she wants.

  • This morning I would not let her put her hand in my plate.

  • I let her see that I was eating, but did not let her put her hand in the plate.

  • She pinched me, and I slapped her every time she did it.

  • After a few minutes she came back to her place and began to eat her breakfast with her fingers.

  • I gave her a spoon, which she threw on the floor.

  • I forced her out of the chair and made her pick it up.

  • In a few minutes she yielded and finished her breakfast peaceably.

  • Then we had another tussle over folding her napkin.

  • It was another hour before I succeeded in getting her napkin folded.

  • Then I let her out into the warm sunshine and went up to my room and threw myself on the bed exhausted.

  • I suppose I shall have many such battles with the little woman before she learns the only two essential things I can teach her, obedience and love.

  • Since I wrote you, Helen and I have gone to live all by ourselves in a little garden-house about a quarter of a mile from her home, only a short distance from Ivy Green, the Keller homestead.

  • I very soon made up my mind that I could do nothing with Helen in the midst of the family, who have always allowed her to do exactly as she pleased.

  • If she ever failed to get what she wanted, it was because of her inability to make the vassals of her household understand what it was.

  • As I began to teach her, I was beset by many difficulties.

  • I couldn't coax her or compromise with her.

  • To get her to do the simplest thing, such as combing her hair or washing her hands or buttoning her boots, it was necessary to use force, and, of course, a distressing scene followed.

  • Besides, her past experiences and associations were all against me.

  • I saw clearly that it was useless to try to teach her language or anything else until she learned to obey me.

  • She accepted everything I did for her as a matter of course, and refused to be caressed, and there was no way of appealing to her affection or sympathy or childish love of approbation.

  • I had a good, frank talk with Mrs. Keller, and explained to her how difficult it was going to be to do anything with Helen under the existing circumstances.

  • I told her that in my opinion the child ought to be separated from the family for a few weeks at least--that she must learn to depend on and obey me before I could make any headway.

  • She devoted herself to her dolls the first evening, and when it was bedtime she undressed very quietly, but when she felt me get into bed with her, she jumped out on the other side, and nothing that I could do would induce her to get in again.

  • I finally succeeded in getting her on the bed and covered her up, and she lay curled up as near the edge of the bed as possible.

  • She kept going to the door, as if she expected some one, and every now and then she would touch her cheek, which is her sign for her mother, and shake her head sadly.

  • She played with her dolls more than usual, and would have nothing to do with me.

  • It is amusing and pathetic to see Helen with her dolls.

  • I don't think she has any special tenderness for them--I have never seen her caress them; but she dresses and undresses them many times during the day and handles them exactly as she has seen her mother and the nurse handle her baby sister.

  • As I have said before, she is wonderfully bright and active and as quick as lightning in her movements.

  • She has learned three new words, and when I give her the objects, the names of which she has learned, she spells them unhesitatingly; but she seems glad when the lesson is over.

  • She is sitting by me as I write, her face serene and happy, crocheting a long red chain of Scotch wool.

  • She lets me kiss her now, and when she is in a particularly gentle mood, she will sit in my lap for a minute or two; but she does not return my caresses.

  • Her father looks in at us morning and evening as he goes to and from his office, and sees her contentedly stringing her beads or making horizontal lines on her sewing-card, and exclaims, "How quiet she is!"

  • Her father looks in at us morning and evening as he goes to and from his office, and sees her contentedly stringing her beads or making horizontal lines on her sewing-card, and exclaims, "How quiet she is!"

  • When I came, her movements were so insistent that one always felt there was something unnatural and almost weird about her.

  • I have noticed also that she eats much less, a fact which troubles her father so much that he is anxious to get her home.

  • This pleased her very much and stimulated her ambition to excel Percy.

  • When he succeeded in forming it to suit her, she patted him on his woolly head so vigorously that I thought some of his slips were intentional.

  • He wondered if Helen would recognize her old playmate.

  • She usually feels the softest step and throws out her arms to ascertain if any one is near her.

  • Belle didn't seem very anxious to attract her attention.

  • I imagine she has been rather roughly handled sometimes by her little mistress.

  • It was evident that she recognized the dog; for she put her arms round her neck and squeezed her.

  • Then Helen sat down by her and began to manipulate her claws.

  • I think "no" and "yes," conveyed by a shake or a nod of my head, have become facts as apparent to her as hot and cold or as the difference between pain and pleasure.

  • I realize that it hurts to see their afflicted little child punished and made to do things against her will.

  • Only a few hours after my talk with Captain and Mrs. Keller (and they had agreed to everything), Helen took a notion that she wouldn't use her napkin at table.

  • I took her plate away and started to take her out of the room.

  • Her father objected and said that no child of his should be deprived of his food on any account.

  • Helen didn't come up to my room after supper, and I didn't see her again until breakfast-time.

  • She was at her place when I came down.

  • She had put the napkin under her chin, instead of pinning it at the back, as was her custom.

  • I showed her the napkin and pinned it round her neck, then tore it off and threw it on the floor and shook my head.

  • I think she understood perfectly well; for she slapped her hand two or three times and shook her head.

  • I gave her an object, and she spelled the name (she knows twelve now).

  • After spelling half the words, she stopped suddenly, as if a thought had flashed into her mind, and felt for the napkin.

  • I took this for a promise that if I gave her some cake she would be a good girl.

  • I gave her a larger piece than usual, and she chuckled and patted herself.

  • This morning she planted her doll and showed me that she expected her to grow as tall as I. You must see that she is very bright, but you have no idea how cunning she is.

  • Then I let her decide whether she will sew or knit or crochet.

  • She learned to knit very quickly, and is making a wash-cloth for her mother.

  • Last week she made her doll an apron, and it was done as well as any child of her age could do it.

  • Often, when the weather is fine, we drive from four to six, or go to see her aunt at Ivy Green or her cousins in the town.

  • Helen's instincts are decidedly social; she likes to have people about her and to visit her friends, partly, I think, because they always have things she likes to eat.

  • After supper we go to my room and do all sorts of things until eight, when I undress the little woman and put her to bed.

  • Mrs. Keller wanted to get a nurse for her, but I concluded I'd rather be her nurse than look after a stupid, lazy negress.

  • Helen has taken the second great step in her education.

  • We went out to the pump-house, and I made Helen hold her mug under the spout while I pumped.

  • The word coming so close upon the sensation of cold water rushing over her hand seemed to startle her.

  • A new light came into her face.

  • All the way back to the house she was highly excited, and learned the name of every object she touched, so that in a few hours she had adDED THIRTY NEW WORDS TO HER VOCABULARY.

  • Last night when I got in bed, she stole into my arms of her own accord and kissed me for the first time, and I thought my heart would burst, so full was it of joy.

  • She is anxious for her friends to spell, and eager to teach the letters to every one she meets.

  • And we notice that her face grows more expressive each day.

  • In response to questions she points out prettily her nose, mouth, eye, chin, cheek, ear.

  • If I hand her a flower, and say, "Give it to mamma," she takes it to her mother.

  • These observations have given me a clue to the method to be followed in teaching Helen language.I SHALL TALK INTO HER HAND AS WE TALK INTO THE BABY'S EARS.

  • I SHALL USE COMPLETE SENTENCES IN TALKING TO HER, and fill out the meaning with gestures and her descriptive signs when necessity requires it; but I shall not try to keep her mind fixed on any one thing.

  • I SHALL USE COMPLETE SENTENCES IN TALKING TO HER, and fill out the meaning with gestures and her descriptive signs when necessity requires it; but I shall not try to keep her mind fixed on any one thing.

  • Like her baby cousin, she expresses whole sentences by single words.

  • But when I spell into her hand, "Give me some bread," she hands me the bread, or if I say, "Get your hat and we will go to walk," she obeys instantly.

  • Helen went to the cradle and felt of Mildred's mouth and pointed to her own teeth.

  • Helen shook her head and spelled "Baby teeth--no, baby eat--no," meaning of course, "Baby cannot eat because she has no teeth."

  • If she wanted a small object and was given a large one, she would shake her head and take up a tiny bit of the skin of one hand between the thumb and finger of the other.

  • I can now tell her to bring me a large book or a small plate, to go upstairs slowly, to run fast and to walk quickly.

  • I told her to shut the door, and she added, "and lock."

  • She kept spelling "dog--baby" and pointing to her five fingers one after another, and sucking them.

  • Nothing would do but I must go somewhere with her to see something.

  • I taught her the word "puppy" and drew her hand over them all, while they sucked, and spelled "puppies."

  • I suppose her idea was "Baby eats much."

  • She pointed to each puppy, one after another, and to her five fingers, and I taught her the word FIVE.

  • After she had played with them a little while, the thought occurred to her that the puppies must have special names, like people, and she asked for the name of each pup.

  • I told her to ask her father, and she said, "No--mother."

  • She evidently understood that VERY was the name of the new thing that had come into her head; for all the way back to the house she used the word VERY correctly.

  • When she touched her little sister, she said: "Baby--small. Puppy--very small."

  • Soon after, she began to vary her steps from large to small, and little mincing steps were "very small."

  • Her mind grows through its ceaseless activity.

  • Near the landing there is a beautiful little spring, which Helen calls "squirrel-cup," because I told her the squirrels came there to drink.

  • We go home about dinner-time usually, and Helen is eager to tell her mother everything she has seen.

  • This gratifies the child's love of approbation and keeps up her interest in things.

  • WE MAKE A SORT OF GAME OF IT and try to see who can find the words most quickly, Helen with her fingers, or I with my eyes, and she learns as many new words as I can explain with the help of those she knows.

  • When her fingers light upon words she knows, she fairly screams with pleasure and hugs and kisses me for joy, especially if she thinks she has me beaten.

  • I can now tell her to go upstairs or down, out of doors or into the house, lock or unlock a door, take or bring objects, sit, stand, walk, run, lie, creep, roll, or climb.

  • She is delighted with action-words; so it is no trouble at all to teach her verbs.

  • If she finds anything in her way, she flings it on the floor, no matter what it is: a glass, a pitcher, or even a lamp.

  • The other day a friend brought her a new doll from Memphis, and I thought I would see if I could make Helen understand that she must not break it.

  • I made her go through the motion of knocking the doll's head on the table and spelled to her: No, no, Helen is naughty.

  • Teacher is sad, and let her feel the grieved expression on my face.

  • She went through these motions several times, mimicking every movement, then she stood very still for a moment with a troubled look on her face, which suddenly cleared, and she spelled, "Good Helen," and wreathed her face in a very large, artificial smile.

  • The doctor says her mind is too active; but how are we to keep her from thinking?

  • If I refuse to talk to her, she spells into her own hand, and apparently carries on the liveliest conversation with herself.

  • I gave her my braille slate to play with, thinking that the mechanical pricking of holes in the paper would amuse her and rest her mind.

  • She has often gone with me to the post-office to mail letters, and I suppose I have repeated to her things I wrote to you.

  • I asked her what she had written to Frank.

  • The other night when I went to bed, I found Helen sound asleep with a big book clasped tightly in her arms.

  • When I asked her about it in the morning, she said, "Book--cry," and completed her meaning by shaking and other signs of fear.

  • I taught her the word AFRAID, and she said: Helen is not afraid.

  • I told her that the book wasn't afraid, and must sleep in its case, and that "girl" mustn't read in bed.

  • No one can see her without being impressed.

  • She is no ordinary child, and people's interest in her education will be no ordinary interest.

  • Yesterday Helen took off her clothes and sat in her skin all the afternoon.

  • When the sun got round to the window where she was sitting with her book, she got up impatiently and shut the window.

  • One day, when I wanted her to bring me some water, she said: Legs very tired.

  • I let her hold a shell in her hand, and feel the chicken "chip, chip."

  • Her astonishment, when she felt the tiny creature inside, cannot be put in a letter.

  • Of course, I shall not overtax her brain.

  • They tell us that Helen is "overdoing," that her mind is too active (these very people thought she had no mind at all a few months ago!) and suggest many absurd and impossible remedies.

  • But so far nobody seems to have thought of chloroforming her, which is, I think, the only effective way of stopping the natural exercise of her faculties.

  • It gives her something to do, and keeps her quiet, which I think is desirable while this enervating weather lasts.

  • She has counted everything in the house, and is now busy counting the words in her primer.

  • I hope it will not occur to her to count the hairs of her head.

  • If she could see and hear, I suppose she would get rid of her superfluous energy in ways which would not, perhaps, tax her brain so much, although I suspect that the ordinary child takes his play pretty seriously.

  • This suggestion didn't please her, however; for she replied, "No. Nancy is very sick."

  • I happened to tell her the other day that the vine on the fence was a "creeper."

  • She was greatly amused, and began at once to find analogies between her movements and those of the plants.

  • Her every waking moment is spent in the endeavour to satisfy her innate desire for knowledge, and her mind works so incessantly that we have feared for her health.

  • Her every waking moment is spent in the endeavour to satisfy her innate desire for knowledge, and her mind works so incessantly that we have feared for her health.

  • But her appetite, which left her a few weeks ago, has returned, and her sleep seems more quiet and natural.

  • In one lesson I taught her these words: BEDSTEAD, MATTRESS, SHEET, BLANKET, COMFORTER, SPREAD, PILLOW.

  • She enjoys punching holes in paper with the stiletto, and I supposed it was because she could examine the result of her work; but we watched her one day, and I was much surprised to find that she imagined she was writing a letter.

  • When she had finished the letter she carried it to her mother and spelled, "Frank letter," and gave it to her brother to take to the post-office.

  • She is always ready to share whatever she has with those about her, often keeping but very little for herself.

  • She will insist on having her hair put in curl papers when she is so sleepy she can scarcely stand.

  • She discovered a hole in her boot the other morning, and, after breakfast, she went to her father and spelled, "Helen new boot Simpson (her brother) buggy store man."

  • One can easily see her meaning.

  • I found her in a terrible passion.

  • Helen resisted, and Viney tried to force it out of her hand, and I suspect that she slapped the child, or did something which caused this unusual outburst of temper.

  • When I took her hand she was trembling violently, and began to cry.

  • I asked what was the matter, and she spelled: "Viney--bad," and began to slap and kick her with renewed violence.

  • I held her hands firmly until she became more calm.

  • I said: You struck Viney and kicked her and hurt her.

  • She stood very still for a moment, and it was evident from her face, which was flushed and troubled, that a struggle was going on in her mind.

  • I told her that she had better not talk about it any more, but think.

  • She knew that I was much troubled, and would have liked to stay near me; but I thought it best for her to sit by herself.

  • But I told her that my heart was sad, and I didn't feel like eating.

  • She was very much excited when we went upstairs; so I tried to interest her in a curious insect called a stick-bug.

  • But the poor little girl couldn't fix her attention.

  • Her heart was full of trouble, and she wanted to talk about it.

  • She was very willing to go, and let Viney kiss her, though she didn't return the caress.

  • Helen's pencil-writing is excellent, as you will see from the enclosed letter, which she wrote for her own amusement.

  • She has now reached the question stage of her development.

  • "when?" especially "why?" all day long, and as her intelligence grows her inquiries become more insistent.

  • Her mind isn't more logical than the minds of ordinary children.

  • Please give her my love, and tell her Helen sends her a kiss.

  • Everybody there was delighted with Helen, and showered her with gifts and kisses.

  • One of the girls taught her to dance the polka, and a little boy showed her his rabbits and spelled their names for her.

  • She was delighted, and showed her pleasure by hugging and kissing the little fellow, which embarrassed him very much.

  • She has talked incessantly since her return about what she did in Huntsville, and we notice a very decided improvement in her ability to use language.

  • She remembers all that I told her about it, and in telling her mother REPEATED THE VERY WORDS AND PHRASES I HAD USED IN DESCRIBING IT TO HER.

  • In conclusion she asked her mother if she should like to see "very high mountain and beautiful cloudcaps."

  • But it hardly seems possible that any mere words should convey to one who has never seen a mountain the faintest idea of its grandeur; and I don't see how any one is ever to know what impression she did receive, or the cause of her pleasure in what was told her about it.

  • From the beginning, I HAVE MADE IT A PRACTICE TO ANSWER ALL HELEN'S QUESTIONS TO THE BEST OF MY ABILITY IN A WAY INTELLIGIBLE TO HER, and at the same time truthfully.

  • I took Helen and my Botany, "How Plants Grow," up in the tree, where we often go to read and study, and I told her in simple words the story of plantlife.

  • I reminded her of the corn, beans and watermelon-seed she had planted in the spring, and told her that the tall corn in the garden, and the beans and watermelon vines had grown from those seeds.

  • I made her understand that all life comes from an egg.

  • The mother bird lays her eggs in a nest and keeps them warm until the birdlings are hatched.

  • I told her that she could call the egg the cradle of life.

  • I had no difficulty in making it clear to her that if plants and animals didn't produce offspring after their kind, they would cease to exist, and everything in the world would soon die.

  • I did, however, try to give her the idea that love is the great continuer of life.

  • Helen had a letter this morning from her uncle, Doctor Keller.

  • He invited her to come to see him at Hot Springs.

  • The name Hot Springs interested her, and she asked many questions about it.

  • She was much pleased with the letter, and after she had asked all the questions she could think of, she took it to her mother, who was sewing in the hall, and read it to her.

  • It was amusing to see her hold it before her eyes and spell the sentences out on her fingers, just as I had done.

  • Finally Belle got up, shook herself, and was about to walk away, when Helen caught her by the neck and forced her to lie down again.

  • Then she got up and stood very still, as if listening with her feet for Mildred's "thump, thump."

  • Mrs. Keller took the baby in her arms, and when we had succeeded in pacifying her, I asked Helen, "What did you do to baby?"

  • She shook her head.

  • She has the true language-impulse, and shows great fertility of resource in making the words at her command convey her meaning.

  • She found the word "brown" in her primer and wanted to know its meaning.

  • I told her that her hair was brown, and she asked, "Is brown very pretty?"

  • It seems as if a child who could see and hear until her nineteenth month must retain some of her first impressions, though ever so faintly.

  • She likes to have me tell her what I see in pictures.

  • I told her that when we are happy our thoughts are bright, and when we are naughty they are sad.

  • I couldn't help laughing, for at that very moment Viney was shouting at the top of her voice:

  • She wrote it out of her own head, as the children say.

  • Helen wrote another letter to the little girls yesterday, and her father sent it to Mr. Anagnos.

  • She has begun to use the pronouns of her own accord.

  • Now he wants a picture "of darling Helen and her illustrious teacher, to grace the pages of the forthcoming annual report."

  • Only those who are with her daily can realize the rapid advancement which she is making in the acquisition of language.

  • You will see from her letter that she uses many pronouns correctly.

  • Her passion for writing letters and putting her thoughts upon paper grows more intense.

  • Her passion for writing letters and putting her thoughts upon paper grows more intense.

  • I told her that I could see things with my eyes, and that she could see them with her fingers.

  • In her reports Miss Sullivan speaks of "lessons" as if they came in regular order.

  • One day I took her to the cistern.

  • Just then the nurse came into the cistern-house bringing her little sister.

  • Very soon she learned the difference between ON and IN, though it was some time before she could use these words in sentences of her own.

  • "Helen is in wardrobe," "Mildred is in crib," "Box is on table," "Papa is on bed," are specimens of sentences constructed by her during the latter part of April.

  • Taking the bullet she made her habitual sign for SMALL--that is, by pinching a little bit of the skin of one hand.

  • Then she took the other ball and made her sign for LARGE by spreading both hands over it.

  • Then her attention was called to the hardness of the one ball and the softness of the other, and she learned SOFT and HARD.

  • A few minutes afterward she felt of her little sister's head and said to her mother, "Mildred's head is small and hard."

  • Next I tried to teach her the meaning of FAST and SLOW.

  • I then said to her with the finger alphabet, "wind fast," or "wind slow," holding her hands and showing her how to do as I wished.

  • I now thought it time to teach her to read printed words.

  • She moved her finger from one printed character to another as I formed each letter on my fingers.

  • Next I turned to the first page of the primer and made her touch the word CAT, spelling it on my fingers at the same time.

  • Indeed, she was much displeased because I could not find her name in the book.

  • Just then I had no sentences in raised letters which she could understand; but she would sit for hours feeling each word in her book.

  • When she touched one with which she was familiar, a peculiarly sweet expression lighted her face, and we saw her countenance growing sweeter and more earnest every day.

  • Her mother and I cut up several sheets of printed words so that she could arrange them into sentences.

  • I then guided her hand to form the sentence, "Cat does drink milk."

  • She carried it to her mother, who spelled it to her.

  • Day after day she moved her pencil in the same tracks along the grooved paper, never for a moment expressing the least impatience or sense of fatigue.

  • As she had now learned to express her ideas on paper, I next taught her the braille system.

  • She learned it gladly when she discovered that she could herself read what she had written; and this still affords her constant pleasure.

  • For a whole evening she will sit at the table writing whatever comes into her busy brain; and I seldom find any difficulty in reading what she has written.

  • Her progress in arithmetic has been equally remarkable.

  • She was working recently with the number forty, when I said to her, "Make twos."

  • I wished her to make the groups of threes and supposed she would then have to count them in order to know what number fifteen threes would make.

  • On being told that she was white and that one of the servants was black, she concluded that all who occupied a similar menial position were of the same hue; and whenever I asked her the colour of a servant she would say "black."

  • Her eyes actually were filled with tears.

  • The flowers did not seem to give her pleasure, and she was very quiet while we stayed there.

  • On another occasion while walking with me she seemed conscious of the presence of her brother, although we were distant from him.

  • The circus people were much interested in Helen, and did everything they could to make her first circus a memorable event.

  • They let her feel the animals whenever it was safe.

  • They were as gentle as kittens; but I told her they would get wild and fierce as they grew older.

  • She was greatly delighted with the monkeys and kept her hand on the star performer while he went through his tricks, and laughed heartily when he took off his hat to the audience.

  • One cute little fellow stole her hair-ribbon, and another tried to snatch the flowers out of her hat.

  • One of the leopards licked her hands, and the man in charge of the giraffes lifted her up in his arms so that she could feel their ears and see how tall they were.

  • She also felt a Greek chariot, and the charioteer would have liked to take her round the ring; but she was afraid of "many swift horses."

  • Some of them cried, and the wild man of Borneo shrank from her sweet little face in terror.

  • In order to answer her questions, I have been obliged to read a great deal about animals.

  • Helen has learned to tell the time at last, and her father is going to give her a watch for Christmas.

  • Helen is as eager to have stories told her as any hearing child I ever knew.

  • She likes stories that make her cry--I think we all do, it's so nice to feel sad when you've nothing particular to be sad about.

  • I am teaching her little rhymes and verses, too.

  • They fix beautiful thoughts in her memory.

  • Helen is invited to all the children's entertainments, and I take her to as many as I can.

  • I want her to know children and to be with them as much as possible.

  • She was delighted, and showed her joy, by hugging and kissing him, much to his embarrassment.

  • It was not difficult, however, to make her understand that there was a present for each child, and to her great delight she was permitted to hand the gifts to the children.

  • One little girl had fewer presents than the rest, and Helen insisted on sharing her gifts with her.

  • It was very sweet to see the children's eager interest in Helen, and their readiness to give her pleasure.

  • Constant repetition makes it easier to learn how to spell a word.

  • I HAVE TRIED FROM THE BEGINNING TO TALK NATURALLY TO HELEN AND TO TEACH HER TO TELL ME ONLY THINGS THAT INTEREST HER AND ASK QUESTIONS ONLY FOR THE SAKE OF FINDING OUT WHAT SHE WANTS TO KNOW.

  • The child's eagerness and interest carry her over many obstacles that would be our undoing if we stopped to define and explain everything.

  • It was touching and beautiful to see Helen enjoy her first Christmas.

  • Of course, she hung her stocking--two of them lest Santa Claus should forget one, and she lay awake for a long time and got up two or three times to see if anything had happened.

  • When I told her that Santa Claus would not come until she was asleep, she shut her eyes and said, "He will think girl is asleep."

  • The ring you sent her was in the toe of the stocking, and when I told her you gave it to Santa Claus for her, she said, "I do love Mrs. Hopkins."

  • She had a trunk and clothes for Nancy, and her comment was, "Now Nancy will go to party."

  • The other day Helen came across the word grandfather in a little story and asked her mother, "Where is grandfather?" meaning her grandfather.

  • So far, her only knowledge of death is in connection with things to eat.

  • She knows that her father shoots partridges and deer and other game.

  • I wanted her to write to her Uncle Frank this morning, but she objected.

  • Finally I persuaded her to write a few lines; but she broke her pencil six times before she finished it.

  • I said to her, "You are a naughty girl."

  • When I told her that Mildred's eyes were blue, she asked, "Are they like wee skies?"

  • I told her they were tulips; but of course she didn't understand the word-play.

  • We can't make her understand.

  • Helen was petted and caressed enough to spoil an angel; but I do not think it is possible to spoil her, she is too unconscious of herself, and too loving.

  • When we reached the shop, I asked her how much she would pay for Nancy's hat.

  • "I will buy some good candy to take to Tuscumbia," was her reply.

  • Dr. Bell writes that Helen's progress is without a parallel in the education of the deaf, or something like that and he says many nice things about her teacher.

  • Robert is her husband.

  • The children were so pleased to see her at Sunday-school, they paid no attention to their teachers, but rushed out of their seats and surrounded us.

  • She seemed to think at first that the children all belonged to the visiting ministers; but soon she recognized some little friends among them, and I told her the ministers didn't bring their children with them.

  • He put her answer down in his note book.

  • When it was time for the church service to begin, she was in such a state of excitement that I thought it best to take her away; but Captain Keller said, "No, she will be all right."

  • He gave her his watch to play with; but that didn't keep her still.

  • When the wine was passed to our neighbour, he was obliged to stand up to prevent her taking it away from him.

  • I tried to hurry Helen out-of-doors, but she kept her arm extended, and every coat-tail she touched must needs turn round and give an account of the children he left at home, and receive kisses according to their number.

  • Everybody laughed at her antics, and you would have thought they were leaving a place of amusement rather than a church.

  • Finally she got up from the table and went through the motion of picking seaweed and shells, and splashing in the water, holding up her skirts higher than was proper under the circumstances.

  • Her motions are often more expressive than any words, and she is as graceful as a nymph.

  • All the learned men marveled at her intelligence and gaiety.

  • There is something about her that attracts people.

  • I think it is her joyous interest in everything and everybody.

  • Her happiness impressed all; nobody seemed to pity her.

  • Two of the teachers knew the manual alphabet, and talked to her without an interpreter.

  • They were astonished at her command of language.

  • I asked her if the little girl who had written about the new dress was particularly pleased with her dress.

  • These children were older in years, it is true, than the baby who lisps, "Papa kiss baby--pretty," and fills out her meaning by pointing to her new dress; but their ability to understand and use language was no greater.

  • On entering a greenhouse her countenance becomes radiant, and she will tell the names of the flowers with which she is familiar, by the sense of smell alone.

  • Her recollections of the sensations of smell are very vivid.

  • It frequently happens that the perfume of a flower or the flavour of a fruit recalls to her mind some happy event in home life, or a delightful birthday party.

  • Her sense of touch has sensibly increased during the year, and has gained in acuteness and delicacy.

  • Indeed, her whole body is so finely organized that she seems to use it as a medium for bringing herself into closer relations with her fellow creatures.

  • She is able not only to distinguish with great accuracy the different undulations of the air and the vibrations of the floor made by various sounds and motions, and to recognize her friends and acquaintances the instant she touches their hands or clothing, but she also perceives the state of mind of those around her.

  • In my account of Helen last year, I mentioned several instances where she seemed to have called into use an inexplicable mental faculty; but it now seems to me, after carefully considering the matter, that this power may be explained by her perfect familiarity with the muscular variations of those with whom she comes into contact, caused by their emotions.

  • One day, while she was out walking with her mother and Mr. Anagnos, a boy threw a torpedo, which startled Mrs. Keller.

  • Helen felt the change in her mother's movements instantly, and asked, "What are we afraid of?"

  • On one occasion, while walking on the Common with her, I saw a police officer taking a man to the station-house.

  • She would turn her head, smile, and act as though she had heard what was said.

  • I was then standing beside her, holding her hand.

  • At my suggestion, one of the gentlemen took her hand, and the tests were repeated.

  • This time her countenance changed whenever she was spoken to, but there was not such a decided lighting up of the features as when I had held her hand.

  • Even before I knew her, she had handled a dead chicken, or bird, or some other small animal.

  • At last it became necessary to kill him, and, when Helen next asked to go and see him, I told her that he was DEAD.

  • She smelt of the flowers, but showed no desire to pluck them; and, when I gathered a few for her, she refused to have them pinned on her dress.

  • When her attention was drawn to a marble slab inscribed with the name FLORENCE in relief, she dropped upon the ground as though looking for something, then turned to me with a face full of trouble, and asked, "Were is poor little Florence?"

  • Who put her in big hole?

  • Helen had been given a bed and carriage for her dolls, which she had received and used like any other gift.

  • On her return to the house after her visit to the cemetery, she ran to the closet where these toys were kept, and carried them to my friend, saying, "They are poor little Florence's."

  • A letter written to her mother in the course of the following week gave an account of her impression in her own words:

  • I put my little babies to sleep in Florence's little bed, and I take them to ride in her carriage.

  • Doctor gave her medicine to make her well, but poor Florence did not get well.

  • She is never fretful or irritable, and I have never seen her impatient with her playmates because they failed to understand her.

  • Then it is beautiful to observe with what patience, sweetness, and perseverance Helen endeavours to bring the unruly fingers of her little friend into proper position.

  • Will you give her yours?

  • She is very fond of children younger than herself, and a baby invariably calls forth all the motherly instincts of her nature.

  • It is pleasant, too, to note her thoughtfulness for little children, and her readiness to yield to their whims.

  • She has a very sociable disposition, and delights in the companionship of those who can follow the rapid motions of her fingers; but if left alone she will amuse herself for hours at a time with her knitting or sewing.

  • She bends over her book with a look of intense interest, and as the forefinger of her left hand runs along the line, she spells out the words with the other hand; but often her motions are so rapid as to be unintelligible even to those accustomed to reading the swift and varied movements of her fingers.

  • Every shade of feeling finds expression through her mobile features.

  • Her behaviour is easy and natural, and it is charming because of its frankness and evident sincerity.

  • She is not conscious of any reason why she should be awkward; consequently, her movements are free and graceful.

  • One morning she was greatly distressed by finding that one of the dogs had a block fastened to her collar.

  • Her father wrote to her last summer that the birds and bees were eating all his grapes.

  • Her father wrote to her last summer that the birds and bees were eating all his grapes.

  • Sitting beside her in the car, I describe what I see from the window--hills and valleys and the rivers; cotton-fields and gardens in which strawberries, peaches, pears, melons, and vegetables are growing; herds of cows and horses feeding in broad meadows, and flocks of sheep on the hillside; the cities with their churches and schools, hotels and warehouses, and the occupations of the busy people.

  • Naturally, there was at first a strong tendency on her part to use only the important words in a sentence.

  • I got the milk to show her that she had used the correct word; but I did not let her drink it until she had, with my assistance, made a complete sentence, as "Give Helen some milk to drink."

  • In these early lessons I encouraged her in the use of different forms of expression for conveying the same idea.

  • In two or three months after I began to teach her she would say: "Helen wants to go to bed," or, "Helen is sleepy, and Helen will go to bed."

  • This is especially true of her earlier lessons, when her knowledge of language was so slight as to make explanation impossible.

  • Soon after I became her teacher Helen broke her new doll, of which she was very fond.

  • I said to her, "Teacher is SORRY."

  • It is never necessary to urge her to study.

  • Indeed, I am often obliged to coax her to leave an example or a composition.

  • While not confining myself to any special system of instruction, I have tried to add to her general information and intelligence, to enlarge her acquaintance with things around her, and to bring her into easy and natural relations with people.

  • She makes her nest on the ground.

  • The blue-bird makes her nest in a hollow tree and her eggs are blue.

  • We climbed high hill and teacher fell and hurt her head.

  • I tried to describe to her the appearance of a camel; but, as we were not allowed to touch the animal, I feared that she did not get a correct idea of its shape.

  • Between these humps she had placed her doll, which she was giving a ride around the room.

  • I watched her for some time as she moved about, trying to take long strides in order to carry out the idea I had given her of a camel's gait.

  • When I asked her what she was doing, she replied, "I am a very funny camel."

  • In 1892 appeared the Perkins Institution report for 1891, containing a full account of Helen Keller, including many of her letters, exercises, and compositions.

  • From Miss Sullivan's part of this report I give her most important comments and such biographical matter as does not appear elsewhere in the present volume.

  • One day, while her pony and her donkey were standing side by side, Helen went from one to the other, examining them closely.

  • I could see the way Ginger looked; all her beauty gone, her beautiful arched neck drooping, all the spirit gone out of her flashing eyes, all the playfulness gone out of her manner.

  • I said to her, "Tell me, when you have read the poem through, who you think the mother is."

  • After she had read "The Battlefield," by the same author, I asked her which verse she thought was the most beautiful.

  • She has one advantage over ordinary children, that nothing from without distracts her attention from her studies.

  • I have never known her to be willing to leave a lesson when she felt that there was anything in it which she did not understand.

  • If I suggest her leaving a problem in arithmetic until the next day, she answers, "I think it will make my mind stronger to do it now."

  • Helen wanted me to tell her about it.

  • I have found it best not to tell her that she cannot understand, because she is almost certain to become excited.

  • Not long ago I tried to show her how to build a tower with her blocks.

  • After a time I became discouraged, and told her I was afraid she could not make it stand, but that I would build it for her; but she did not approve of this plan.

  • She has nearly finished Colburn's mental arithmetic, her last work being in improper fractions.

  • Her mind works so rapidly, that it often happens, that when I give her an example she will give me the correct answer before I have time to write out the question.

  • Her mind works so rapidly, that it often happens, that when I give her an example she will give me the correct answer before I have time to write out the question.

  • Once, when a question puzzled her very much, I suggested that we take a walk and then perhaps she would understand it.

  • She shook her head decidedly, and said: My enemies would think I was running away.

  • The intellectual improvement which Helen has made in the past two years is shown more clearly in her greater command of language and in her ability to recognize nicer shades of meaning in the use of words, than in any other branch of her education.

  • In selecting books for Helen to read, I have never chosen them with reference to her deafness and blindness.

  • She always reads such books as seeing and hearing children of her age read and enjoy.

  • When she had read the words of the second sentence, I showed her that there really was a mouse in the box.

  • She then moved her finger to the next line with an expression of eager interest.

  • I called her attention to the following line, and, although she knew only the three words, CAT, EAT and MOUSE, she caught the idea.

  • By signs she made me understand that she wished another story, and I gave her a book containing very short stories, written in the most elementary style.

  • She ran her fingers along the lines, finding the words she knew and guessing at the meaning of others, in a way that would convince the most conservative of educators that a little deaf child, if given the opportunity, will learn to read as easily and naturally as ordinary children.

  • I am convinced that Helen's use of English is due largely to her familiarity with books.

  • She often reads for two or three hours in succession, and then lays aside her book reluctantly.

  • I have found it a convenient medium of communicating with Helen when she is at some distance from me, for it enables me to talk with her by tapping upon the floor with my foot.

  • It was hoped that one so peculiarly endowed by nature as Helen, would, if left entirely to her own resources, throw some light upon such psychological questions as were not exhaustively investigated by Dr. Howe; but their hopes were not to be realized.

  • Finally she one day demanded a name for the power, the existence of which she had already conceived in her own mind.

  • When I subsequently talked with her she said: I have something very funny to tell you.

  • Here she examined her arm with evident satisfaction, laughing heartily to herself.

  • She had met with the expression Mother Nature in the course of her reading, and for a long time she was in the habit of ascribing to Mother Nature whatever she felt to be beyond the power of man to accomplish.

  • After May, 1890, it was evident to me that she had reached a point where it was impossible to keep from her the religious beliefs held by those with whom she was in daily contact.

  • She almost overwhelmed me with inquiries which were the natural outgrowth of her quickened intelligence.

  • Early in May she wrote on her tablet the following list of questions:

  • Throughout Helen's education I have invariably assumed that she can understand whatever it is desirable for her to know.

  • But after a great deal of thought and study, I told her, men came to believe that all forces were manifestations of one power, and to that power they gave the name GOD.

  • I was compelled to evade her question, for I could not explain to her the mystery of a self-existent being.

  • Indeed, many of her eager questions would have puzzled a far wiser person than I am.

  • I told her that God was everywhere, and that she must not think of Him as a person, but as the life, the mind, the soul of everything.

  • It is often necessary to remind her that there are infinitely many things that the wisest people in the world cannot explain.

  • The Rt. Rev. Phillips Brooks has explained to her in a beautiful way the fatherhood of God.

  • I have already told her in simple language of the beautiful and helpful life of Jesus, and of His cruel death.

  • The narrative affected her greatly when first she listened to it.

  • I then asked her, "Can you think of your soul as separate from your body?"

  • At this moment another thought seemed to flash through her mind, and she added, "But Mr. Anagnos did not speak to my soul."

  • I explained to her that the soul, too, is invisible, or in other words, that it is without apparent form.

  • When asked if she would not like to live ALWAYS in a beautiful country called heaven, her first question was, "Where is heaven?"

  • It was more than a year before she alluded to the subject again, and when she did return to it, her questions were numerous and persistent.

  • When her friend added that some of the pupils he had seen in Budapest had more than one hundred tunes in their heads, she said, laughing, "I think their heads must be very noisy."

  • Is it blind? she asked; for in her mind the idea of being led was associated with blindness.

  • The fact that sin exists, and that great misery results from it, dawned gradually upon her mind as she understood more and more clearly the lives and experiences of those around her.

  • Then why did He let little sister fall this morning, and hurt her head so badly?

  • To her pure soul all evil is equally unlovely.

  • At first, the words, phrases and sentences which she used in expressing her thoughts were all reproductions of what we had used in conversation with her, and which her memory had unconsciously retained.

  • I always tried to find out what interested her most, and made that the starting-point for the new lesson, whether it had any bearing on the lesson I had planned to teach or not.

  • During the first two years of her intellectual life, I required Helen to write very little.

  • Helen has had the best and purest models in language constantly presented to her, and her conversation and her writing are unconscious reproductions of what she has read.

  • Her mind is so filled with the beautiful thoughts and ideals of the great poets that nothing seems commonplace to her; for her imagination colours all life with its own rich hues.

  • Her mind is so filled with the beautiful thoughts and ideals of the great poets that nothing seems commonplace to her; for her imagination colours all life with its own rich hues.

  • All day long in their play-time and work-time Miss Sullivan kept spelling into her pupil's hand, and by that Helen Keller absorbed words, just as the child in the cradle absorbs words by hearing thousands of them before he uses one and by associating the words with the occasion of their utterance.

  • Miss Sullivan never needlessly belittled her ideas or expressions to suit the supposed state of the child's intelligence.

  • She urged every one to speak to Helen naturally, to give her full sentences and intelligent ideas, never minding whether Helen understood or not.

  • By watching them, she learned to treat her pupil as nearly as possible like an ordinary child.

  • It is true rather that she has a special aptitude for thinking, and her leaning toward language is due to the fact that language to her meant life.

  • It was not a special subject, like geography or arithmetic, but her way to outward things.

  • In the same way she played with Latin, learning not only from the lessons her first Latin teacher gave her, but from going over and over the words of a text, a game she played by herself.

  • Often I found her, when she had a little leisure, sitting in her favourite corner, in a chair whose arms supported the big volume prepared for the blind, and passing her finger slowly over the lines of Moliere's 'Le Medecin Malgre Lui,' chuckling to herself at the comical situations and humorous lines.

  • It was not a lesson, but only one of her recreations.

  • So Helen Keller's aptitude for language is her whole mental aptitude, turned to language because of its extraordinary value to her.

  • Her method might not succeed so completely in the hands of any one else.

  • Miss Sullivan's vigorous, original mind has lent much of its vitality to her pupil.

  • And this does not mean that Miss Keller is unduly dependent on her teacher.

  • Mrs. Keller writes me that before her illness Helen made signs for everything, and her mother thought this habit the cause of her slowness in learning to speak.

  • She recognized that others used their lips; she "saw" her father reading a paper and when he laid it down she sat in his chair and held the paper before her face.

  • Her early rages were an unhappy expression of the natural force of character which instruction was to turn into trained and organized power.

  • It was, then, to a good subject that Miss Sullivan brought her devotion and intelligence, and fearless willingness to experiment.

  • Her voice is low and pleasant to listen to.

  • Her speech lacks variety and modulation; it runs in a sing-song when she is reading aloud; and when she speaks with fair degree of loudness, it hovers about two or three middle tones.

  • Her voice has an aspirate quality; there seems always to be too much breath for the amount of tone.

  • Some of her notes are musical and charming.

  • When she is telling a child's story, or one with pathos in it, her voice runs into pretty slurs from one tone to another.

  • Her friend, Mr. John Hitz, whose native tongue is German, says that her pronunciation is excellent.

  • Her friend, Mr. John Hitz, whose native tongue is German, says that her pronunciation is excellent.

  • Another friend, who is as familiar with French as with English, finds her French much more intelligible than her English.

  • It would, I think, be hard to make her feel just how to pronounce DICTIONARY without her erring either toward DICTIONAYRY or DICTION'RY, and, of course the word is neither one nor the other.

  • Her AWFUL is nearly AWFIL.

  • Miss Keller will never be able, I believe, to speak loud without destroying the pleasant quality and the distinctness of her words, but she can do much to make her speech clearer.

  • When she was at the Wright-Humason School in New York, Dr. Humason tried to improve her voice, not only her word pronunciation, but the voice itself, and gave her lessons in tone and vocal exercises.

  • Some understand her readily; others do not.

  • Her friends grow accustomed to her speech and forget that it is different from that of any one else.

  • Her friends grow accustomed to her speech and forget that it is different from that of any one else.

  • Children seldom have any difficulty in understanding her; which suggests that her deliberate measured speech is like theirs, before they come to the adult trick of running all the words of a phrase into one movement of the breath.

  • Miss Sullivan's account in her address at Chautauqua, in July, 1894, at the meeting of The American Association to Promote the Teaching of Speech to the Deaf, is substantially like Miss Keller's in points of fact.

  • I made no effort to teach her to speak, because I regarded her inability to watch the lips of others as an insurmountable obstacle.

  • I explained to her that some deaf children were taught to speak, but that they could see their teachers' mouths, and that that was a very great assistance to them.

  • But, with all her eagerness and intelligence, learning to speak taxed her powers to the utmost.

  • Teachers of the deaf often express surprise that Helen's speech is so good when she has not received any regular instruction in speech since the first few lessons given her by Miss Fuller.

  • I thought, however, that the advantage she would derive would not repay her for the time and labour that such an experiment would cost.

  • When she was stricken down with the illness which resulted in her loss of sight and hearing, at the age of nineteen months, she was learning to talk.

  • She continued to exercise her vocal organs mechanically, as ordinary children do.

  • Her pronunciation of this gradually became indistinct, and when I first knew her it was nothing more than a peculiar noise.

  • Her pronunciation of this gradually became indistinct, and when I first knew her it was nothing more than a peculiar noise.

  • Her little hands felt every object and observed every movement of the persons about her, and she was quick to imitate these movements.

  • Her little hands felt every object and observed every movement of the persons about her, and she was quick to imitate these movements.

  • At the time when I became her teacher, she had made for herself upward of sixty signs, all of which were imitative and were readily understood by those who knew her.

  • The only signs which I think she may have invented were her signs for SMALL and LARGE.

  • It seems, however, that, while she was still suffering from severe pain, she noticed the movements of her mother's lips.

  • This was in imitation of her mother's crooning to the baby.

  • Occasionally she broke out into a merry laugh, and then she would reach out and touch the mouth of any one who happened to be near her, to see if he were laughing also.

  • She kept one hand on the singer's mouth, while the other rested on the piano, and she stood in this position as long as any one would sing to her, and afterward she would make a continuous sound which she called singing.

  • It will be seen that they contain three vowel and six consonant elements, and these formed the foundation for her first real lesson in speaking.

  • Hard consonants were, and indeed still are, very difficult for her to pronounce in connection with one another in the same word; she often suppresses the one and changes the other, and sometimes she replaces both by an analogous sound with soft aspiration.

  • Enough appears in the accounts by Miss Keller's teacher to show the process by which she reads the lips with her fingers, the process by which she was taught to speak, and by which, of course, she can listen to conversation now.

  • President Roosevelt had little difficulty last spring in making Miss Keller understand him, and especially requested Miss Sullivan not to spell into her hand.

  • The ability to read the lips helps Miss Keller in getting corrections of her pronunciation from Miss Sullivan and others, just as it was the means of her learning to speak at all, but it is rather an accomplishment than a necessity.

  • It must be remembered that speech contributed in no way to her fundamental education, though without the ability to speak she could hardly have gone to higher schools and to college.

  • But the extracts from Miss Sullivan's letters and from her reports, although they are clear and accurate, have not the beauty which distinguishes Miss Keller's English.

  • Her service as a teacher of English is not to be measured by her own skill in composition.

  • Her service as a teacher of English is not to be measured by her own skill in composition.

  • The reason why she read to her pupil so many good books is due, in some measure, to the fact that she had so recently recovered her eyesight.

  • After the first year or so of elementary work she met her pupil on equal terms, and they read and enjoyed good books together.

  • On the other hand, the peculiar value to her of language, which ordinary people take for granted as a necessary part of them like their right hand, made her think about language and love it.

  • Language was her liberator, and from the first she cherished it.

  • Miss Keller has given her account of it, and the whole matter was discussed in the first Volta Bureau Souvenir from which I quote at length:

  • In this paper Miss Sullivan says: During this winter (1891-92) I went with her into the yard while a light snow was falling, and let her feel the falling flakes.

  • I inquired of her where she had read this; she did not remember having read it, did not seem to know that she had learned it.

  • 'Out of the bosom of the air, Out of the cloud-folds of her garments shaken, Over the woodlands brown and bare, Over the harvest-fields forsaken, Silent, and soft, and slow Descends the snow.'

  • One warm, sunny day in early spring, when we were at the North, the balmy atmosphere appears to have brought to her mind the sentiment expressed by Longfellow in "Hiawatha," and she almost sings with the poet: "The ground was all aquiver with the stir of new life.

  • About the same time, in a letter to a friend, in which she makes mention of her Southern home, she gives so close a reproduction from a poem by one of her favourite authors that I will give extracts from Helen's letter and from the poem itself:

  • In a letter to a friend at the Perkins Institution, dated May 17, 1889, she gives a reproduction from one of Hans Christian Andersen's stories, which I had read to her not long before.

  • The original story was read to her from a copy of "Andersen's Stories," published by Leavitt & Allen Bros., and may be found on p. 97 of Part I. in that volume.

  • Her admiration for the impressive explanations which Bishop Brooks has given her of the Fatherhood of God is well known.

  • Her admiration for the impressive explanations which Bishop Brooks has given her of the Fatherhood of God is well known.

  • The pages of the book she reads become to her like paintings, to which her imaginative powers give life and colour.

  • The pictures the language paints on her memory appear to make an indelible impression; and many times, when an experience comes to her similar in character, the language starts forth with wonderful accuracy, like the reflection from a mirror.

  • This is shown in a little story she wrote in October last at the home of her parents in Tuscumbia, which she called "Autumn Leaves."

  • She was at work upon it about two weeks, writing a little each day, at her own pleasure.

  • As we had never seen or heard of any such story as this before, we inquired of her where she read it; she replied, "I did not read it; it is my story for Mr. Anagnos's birthday."

  • Helen and I spent the summer of 1888 with Mrs. Hopkins at her home in Brewster, Mass., where she kindly relieved me a part of the time, of the care of Helen.

  • But as she was not able to find her copy, and applications for the volume at bookstores in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Albany, and other places resulted only in failure, search was instituted for the author herself.

  • This became a difficult task, as her publishers in Philadelphia had retired from business many years ago; however, it was eventually discovered that her residence is at Wilmington, Delaware, and copies of the second edition of the book, 1889, were obtained from her.

  • I shall write to her in a short time.

  • Please give her my warm love, and tell her not to feel troubled about it any more.

  • Tell her there are a few bitter drops in every one's cup, and the only way is to take the bitter patiently, and the sweet thankfully.

  • I shall love to hear of her reception of the book and how she likes the stories which are new to her.

  • She thinks it is wonderful that two people should write stories so much alike; but she still considers her own as original.

  • I give below a portion of Miss Canby's story, "The Rose Fairies," and also Helen's letter to Mr. Anagnos containing her "dream," so that the likenesses and differences may be studied by those interested in the subject:

  • Now Helen, in her letter of February, 1890 (quoted above), alludes to this story of Miss Canby's as a dream "WHICH I HAD A LONG TIME AGO WHEN I WAS A VERY LITTLE CHILD."

  • (The following entry made by Helen in her diary speaks for itself.)

  • The person said her story was called "Frost Fairies."

  • I thought very much about the sad news when teacher went to the doctor's; she was not here at dinner and I missed her.'

  • Her father, Captain Keller, wrote to me as follows on the subject:

  • I hasten to assure you that Helen could not have received any idea of the story from any of her relations or friends here, none of whom can communicate with her readily enough to impress her with the details of a story of that character.

  • Her testimony is as follows:

  • I first tried to ascertain what had suggested to Helen's mind the particular fancies which made her story seem like a reproduction of one written by Miss Margaret Canby.

  • She could not remember that any one had ever read to her any stories about King Frost, but said she had talked with her teacher about Jack Frost and the wonderful things he did.

  • The only person that we supposed might possibly have read the story to Helen was her friend, Mrs. Hopkins, whom she was visiting at the time in Brewster.

  • This may explain the reason why Helen claims persistently that "The Frost King" is her own story.

  • Veracity is the strongest element of her character.

  • She could not keep back her tears, and the chief cause of her pain seemed to be the fear lest people should doubt her truthfulness.

  • In this case Helen Keller held almost intact in her mind, unmixed with other ideas, the words of a story which at the time it was read to her she did not fully understand.

  • The style of her version is in some respects even better than the style of Miss Canby's story.

  • It was a word that created these thoughts in her mind.

  • In the early years of her education she had only good things to read; some were, indeed, trivial and not excellent in style, but not one was positively bad in manner or substance.

  • This happy condition has obtained throughout her life.

  • When she came to retell the story in a fuller form, the echo was still in her mind of the phrases she had written nine years before.

  • My mother sat beside my little bed and tried to soothe my feverish moans while in her troubled heart she prayed, "Father in Heaven, spare my baby's life!"

  • I would cling to my mother's dress as she went about her household duties, and my little hands felt every object and observed every motion, and in this way I learned a great many things.

  • In the years when she was growing out of childhood, her style lost its early simplicity and became stiff and, as she says, "periwigged."

  • At times Miss Keller seemed to lack flexibility, her thoughts ran in set phrases which she seemed to have no power to revise or turn over in new ways.

  • Miss Keller began to get the better of her old friendly taskmaster, the phrase.

  • This book, her first mature experiment in writing, settles the question of her ability to write.

  • Stevenson, whom Miss Sullivan likes and used to read to her pupil, is another marked influence.

  • Her vocabulary has all the phrases that other people use, and the explanation of it, and the reasonableness of it ought to be evident by this time.

  • There is no reason why she should strike from her vocabulary all words of sound and vision.

  • Writing for other people, she should in many cases be true to outer fact rather than to her own experience.

  • In her style, as in what she writes about, we must concede to the artist what we deny to the autobiographer.

  • It is true, on the other hand, that in her descriptions, she is best from the point of view of art when she is faithful to her own sensations; and this is precisely true of all artists.

  • It seems worth while, however, to quote from some of her chance bits of writing, which are neither so informal as her letters nor so carefully composed as her story of her life.

  • These extracts are from her exercises in her course in composition, where she showed herself at the beginning of her college life quite without rival among her classmates.

  • I have felt a bud "shyly doff her green hood and blossom with a silken burst of sound," while the icy fingers of the snow beat against the window-panes.

  • This was an airy and unplastered cabin, fit to entertain a travelling god, and where a goddess might trail her garments.

  • An elderly dame, too, dwells in my neighborhood, invisible to most persons, in whose odorous herb garden I love to stroll sometimes, gathering simples and listening to her fables; for she has a genius of unequalled fertility, and her memory runs back farther than mythology, and she can tell me the original of every fable, and on what fact every one is founded, for the incidents occurred when she was young.

  • A ruddy and lusty old dame, who delights in all weathers and seasons, and is likely to outlive all her children yet.

  • Not my or thy great-grandfather's, but our great-grandmother Nature's universal, vegetable, botanic medicines, by which she has kept herself young always, outlived so many old Parrs in her day, and fed her health with their decaying fatness.

  • It is a gem of the first water which Concord wears in her coronet.

  • He goes to the mill-pond, she to her preserve-pot.

  • They gave me a pair of her "wings," which I keep still.

  • Here, by the very corner of my field, still nearer to town, Zilpha, a colored woman, had her little house, where she spun linen for the townsfolk, making the Walden Woods ring with her shrill singing, for she had a loud and notable voice.

  • At length, in the war of 1812, her dwelling was set on fire by English soldiers, prisoners on parole, when she was away, and her cat and dog and hens were all burned up together.

  • One old frequenter of these woods remembers, that as he passed her house one noon he heard her muttering to herself over her gurgling pot--"Ye are all bones, bones!"

  • One of the last of the philosophers--Connecticut gave him to the world--he peddled first her wares, afterwards, as he declares, his brains.

  • At length the old hound burst into view with muzzle to the ground, and snapping the air as if possessed, and ran directly to the rock; but, spying the dead fox, she suddenly ceased her hounding as if struck dumb with amazement, and walked round and round him in silence; and one by one her pups arrived, and, like their mother, were sobered into silence by the mystery.

  • One had her form under my house all winter, separated from me only by the flooring, and she startled me each morning by her hasty departure when I began to stir--thump, thump, thump, striking her head against the floor timbers in her hurry.

  • It looked as if Nature no longer contained the breed of nobler bloods, but stood on her last toes.

  • She has long ago taken her resolution.

  • It convinces me that Earth is still in her swaddling-clothes, and stretches forth baby fingers on every side.

  • The phÅ“be had already come once more and looked in at my door and window, to see if my house was cavern-like enough for her, sustaining herself on humming wings with clinched talons, as if she held by the air, while she surveyed the premises.

  • I saw that the State was half-witted, that it was timid as a lone woman with her silver spoons, and that it did not know its friends from its foes, and I lost all my remaining respect for it, and pitied it.

  • In fact, I quietly declare war with the State, after my fashion, though I will still make what use and get what advantage of her I can, as is usual in such cases.

  • If we were left solely to the wordy wit of legislators in Congress for our guidance, uncorrected by the seasonable experience and the effectual complaints of the people, America would not long retain her rank among the nations.

  • All her invitations without exception, written in French, and delivered by a scarlet-liveried footman that morning, ran as follows:

  • She added that Her Majesty had deigned to show Baron Funke beaucoup d'estime, and again her face clouded over with sadness.

  • She added that Her Majesty had deigned to show Baron Funke beaucoup d'estime, and again her face clouded over with sadness.

  • I don't like him, she added in a tone admitting of no rejoinder and raising her eyebrows.

  • Prince Vasili's daughter, the beautiful Helene, came to take her father to the ambassador's entertainment; she wore a ball dress and her badge as maid of honor.

  • The aunt spoke to each of them in the same words, about their health and her own, and the health of Her Majesty, "who, thank God, was better today."

  • The aunt spoke to each of them in the same words, about their health and her own, and the health of Her Majesty, "who, thank God, was better today."

  • And each visitor, though politeness prevented his showing impatience, left the old woman with a sense of relief at having performed a vexatious duty and did not return to her the whole evening.

  • As is always the case with a thoroughly attractive woman, her defect--the shortness of her upper lip and her half-open mouth--seemed to be her own special and peculiar form of beauty.

  • Everyone brightened at the sight of this pretty young woman, so soon to become a mother, so full of life and health, and carrying her burden so lightly.

  • The little princess went round the table with quick, short, swaying steps, her workbag on her arm, and gaily spreading out her dress sat down on a sofa near the silver samovar, as if all she was doing was a pleasure to herself and to all around her.

  • "I have brought my work," said she in French, displaying her bag and addressing all present.

  • "Mind, Annette, I hope you have not played a wicked trick on me," she added, turning to her hostess.

  • And she spread out her arms to show her short-waisted, lace-trimmed, dainty gray dress, girdled with a broad ribbon just below the breast.

  • Anna Pavlovna greeted him with the nod she accorded to the lowest hierarchy in her drawing room.

  • Anna Pavlovna's alarm was justified, for Pierre turned away from the aunt without waiting to hear her speech about Her Majesty's health.

  • Anna Pavlovna's alarm was justified, for Pierre turned away from the aunt without waiting to hear her speech about Her Majesty's health.

  • "You think so?" rejoined Anna Pavlovna in order to say something and get away to attend to her duties as hostess.

  • And having got rid of this young man who did not know how to behave, she resumed her duties as hostess and continued to listen and watch, ready to help at any point where the conversation might happen to flag.

  • But amid these cares her anxiety about Pierre was evident.

  • Anna Pavlovna was obviously serving him up as a treat to her guests.

  • Helene was so lovely that not only did she not show any trace of coquetry, but on the contrary she even appeared shy of her unquestionable and all too victorious beauty.

  • The princess rested her bare round arm on a little table and considered a reply unnecessary.

  • From time to time she smoothed the folds of her dress, and whenever the story produced an effect she glanced at Anna Pavlovna, at once adopted just the expression she saw on the maid of honor's face, and again relapsed into her radiant smile.

  • "Charming!" whispered the little princess, sticking the needle into her work as if to testify that the interest and fascination of the story prevented her from going on with it.

  • He turned away from her with a grimace that distorted his handsome face, kissed Anna Pavlovna's hand, and screwing up his eyes scanned the whole company.

  • Pierre gazed at her with rapturous, almost frightened, eyes as she passed him.

  • All the affectation of interest she had assumed had left her kindly and tear-worn face and it now expressed only anxiety and fear.

  • She had now come to Petersburg to procure an appointment in the Guards for her only son.

  • Be the kindhearted man you always were, she said, trying to smile though tears were in her eyes.

  • "Papa, we shall be late," said Princess Helene, turning her beautiful head and looking over her classically molded shoulder as she stood waiting by the door.

  • Apparently she had forgotten her age and by force of habit employed all the old feminine arts.

  • But as soon as the prince had gone her face resumed its former cold, artificial expression.

  • Her task was accomplished.

  • He explained this to her with as much gravity as if she had asked him to do it.

  • Do you consider that assassination shows greatness of soul? said the little princess, smiling and drawing her work nearer to her.

  • In the first moment of Pierre's outburst Anna Pavlovna, despite her social experience, was horror-struck.

  • But when she saw that Pierre's sacrilegious words had not exasperated the vicomte, and had convinced herself that it was impossible to stop him, she rallied her forces and joined the vicomte in a vigorous attack on the orator.

  • That was horrible! said the little princess, shrugging her shoulders.

  • She must have two footmen behind her carriage, and very big ones.

  • That was her taste.

  • Having thanked Anna Pavlovna for her charming soiree, the guests began to take their leave.

  • Prince Hippolyte stood close to the pretty, pregnant princess, and stared fixedly at her through his eyeglass.

  • Write to her and let me know how her father looks at the matter.

  • Prince Hippolyte approached the little princess and, bending his face close to her, began to whisper something.

  • "They say the ball will be very good," replied the princess, drawing up her downy little lip.

  • Still smiling, she gracefully moved away, turning and glancing at her husband.

  • The princess, picking up her dress, was taking her seat in the dark carriage, her husband was adjusting his saber; Prince Hippolyte, under pretense of helping, was in everyone's way.

  • She had changed her gown for a house dress as fresh and elegant as the other.

  • Evidently Pierre's words touched her to the quick.

  • (she looked significantly at her husband) "I'm afraid, I'm afraid!" she whispered, and a shudder ran down her back.

  • Her tone was now querulous and her lip drawn up, giving her not a joyful, but an animal, squirrel-like expression.

  • Her tone was now querulous and her lip drawn up, giving her not a joyful, but an animal, squirrel-like expression.

  • She paused as if she felt it indecorous to speak of her pregnancy before Pierre, though the gist of the matter lay in that.

  • The princess said nothing, but suddenly her short downy lip quivered.

  • Pierre looked over his spectacles with naive surprise, now at him and now at her, moved as if about to rise too, but changed his mind.

  • But that one word expressed an entreaty, a threat, and above all conviction that she would herself regret her words.

  • "No, he thinks only of himself," muttered the princess without restraining her angry tears.

  • Her beautiful eyes glanced askance at her husband's face, and her own assumed the timid, deprecating expression of a dog when it rapidly but feebly wags its drooping tail.

  • Her beautiful eyes glanced askance at her husband's face, and her own assumed the timid, deprecating expression of a dog when it rapidly but feebly wags its drooping tail.

  • "Mon Dieu, mon Dieu!" she muttered, and lifting her dress with one hand she went up to her husband and kissed him on the forehead.

  • "Good night, Lise," said he, rising and courteously kissing her hand as he would have done to a stranger.

  • Prince Vasili kept the promise he had given to Princess Drubetskaya who had spoken to him on behalf of her only son Boris on the evening of Anna Pavlovna's soiree.

  • The Guards had already left Petersburg on the tenth of August, and her son, who had remained in Moscow for his equipment, was to join them on the march to Radzivilov.

  • The countess herself and her handsome eldest daughter were in the drawing-room with the visitors who came to congratulate, and who constantly succeeded one another in relays.

  • A languor of motion and speech, resulting from weakness, gave her a distinguished air which inspired respect.

  • "Marya Lvovna Karagina and her daughter!" announced the countess' gigantic footman in his bass voice, entering the drawing room.

  • The countess reflected a moment and took a pinch from a gold snuffbox with her husband's portrait on it.

  • However, I'll see her and no more.

  • Ask her in," she said to the footman in a sad voice, as if saying: "Very well, finish me off."

  • The visitor made a gesture with her hand.

  • The countess looked at her callers, smiling affably, but not concealing the fact that she would not be distressed if they now rose and took their leave.

  • It was evident that she had not intended her flight to bring her so far.

  • "You spoil her, Ilya," she added, turning to her husband.

  • Escaping from her father she ran to hide her flushed face in the lace of her mother's mantilla--not paying the least attention to her severe remark--and began to laugh.

  • You see... was all Natasha managed to utter (to her everything seemed funny).

  • She leaned against her mother and burst into such a loud, ringing fit of laughter that even the prim visitor could not help joining in.

  • "Now then, go away and take your monstrosity with you," said the mother, pushing away her daughter with pretended sternness, and turning to the visitor she added: "She is my youngest girl."

  • Natasha, raising her face for a moment from her mother's mantilla, glanced up at her through tears of laughter, and again hid her face.

  • She did not reply, but looked at her seriously.

  • Boris on the contrary at once found his footing, and related quietly and humorously how he had known that doll Mimi when she was still quite a young lady, before her nose was broken; how she had aged during the five years he had known her, and how her head had cracked right across the skull.

  • The only young people remaining in the drawing room, not counting the young lady visitor and the countess' eldest daughter (who was four years older than her sister and behaved already like a grown-up person), were Nicholas and Sonya, the niece.

  • By the grace of her movements, by the softness and flexibility of her small limbs, and by a certain coyness and reserve of manner, she reminded one of a pretty, half-grown kitten which promises to become a beautiful little cat.

  • The visitor, not knowing what to say, shook her head.

  • The little kitten, feasting her eyes on him, seemed ready at any moment to start her gambols again and display her kittenish nature.

  • We have engaged an Italian to give her lessons.

  • Perhaps I spoil her, but really that seems the best plan.

  • With her elder sister I was stricter.

  • I thought they would never go, said the countess, when she had seen her guests out.

  • She was already growing impatient, and stamped her foot, ready to cry at his not coming at once, when she heard the young man's discreet steps approaching neither quickly nor slowly.

  • Natasha, very still, peered out from her ambush, waiting to see what he would do.

  • Natasha was about to call him but changed her mind.

  • Natasha checked her first impulse to run out to her, and remained in her hiding place, watching--as under an invisible cap--to see what went on in the world.

  • How can you torture me and yourself like that, for a mere fancy? said Nicholas taking her hand.

  • He drew her to him and kissed her.

  • Boris followed her, smiling.

  • Boris looked attentively and kindly at her eager face, but did not reply.

  • She caught the young officer by his cuffs, and a look of solemnity and fear appeared on her flushed face.

  • Would you like to kiss me? she whispered almost inaudibly, glancing up at him from under her brows, smiling, and almost crying from excitement.

  • "How funny you are!" he said, bending down to her and blushing still more, but he waited and did nothing.

  • Suddenly she jumped up onto a tub to be higher than he, embraced him so that both her slender bare arms clasped him above his neck, and, tossing back her hair, kissed him full on the lips.

  • Then she slipped down among the flowerpots on the other side of the tubs and stood, hanging her head.

  • "Thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen," she counted on her slender little fingers.

  • A smile of joy and satisfaction lit up her eager face.

  • After receiving her visitors, the countess was so tired that she gave orders to admit no more, but the porter was told to be sure to invite to dinner all who came "to congratulate."

  • The countess wished to have a tête-à-tête talk with the friend of her childhood, Princess Anna Mikhaylovna, whom she had not seen properly since she returned from Petersburg.

  • Anna Mikhaylovna, with her tear-worn but pleasant face, drew her chair nearer to that of the countess.

  • The countess pressed her friend's hand.

  • "Vera," she said to her eldest daughter who was evidently not a favorite, "how is it you have so little tact?

  • "If you had told me sooner, Mamma, I would have gone," she replied as she rose to go to her own room.

  • Sonya was sitting close to Nicholas who was copying out some verses for her, the first he had ever written.

  • She lingered in the room with the inkstand in her hand.

  • And my affairs are in such a bad way that my position is now a terrible one, continued Anna Mikhaylovna, sadly, dropping her voice.

  • She took out her handkerchief and began to cry.

  • And like a practical Petersburg lady who knows how to make the most of time, Anna Mikhaylovna sent someone to call her son, and went into the anteroom with him.

  • "My dear Boris," said the mother, drawing her hand from beneath her old mantle and laying it timidly and tenderly on her son's arm, "be affectionate and attentive to him.

  • "If only I knew that anything besides humiliation would come of it..." answered her son coldly.

  • "My dear!" exclaimed his mother imploringly, again laying her hand on his arm as if that touch might soothe or rouse him.

  • The mother smoothed the folds of her dyed silk dress before a large Venetian mirror in the wall, and in her trodden-down shoes briskly ascended the carpeted stairs.

  • "My dear," she said to her son, once more stimulating him by a touch, "you promised me!"

  • The son, lowering his eyes, followed her quietly.

  • Seeing Anna Mikhaylovna and her son, Prince Vasili dismissed the doctor with a bow and approached them silently and with a look of inquiry.

  • Prince Vasili stared at her and at Boris questioningly and perplexed.

  • I never could understand how Nataly made up her mind to marry that unlicked bear!

  • "What do the doctors say?" asked the princess after a pause, her worn face again expressing deep sorrow.

  • He is his godson, she added, her tone suggesting that this fact ought to give Prince Vasili much satisfaction.

  • She bent her head and continued in a whisper: Has he performed his final duty, Prince?

  • Evidently the prince understood her, and also understood, as he had done at Anna Pavlovna's, that it would be difficult to get rid of Anna Mikhaylovna.

  • The length of her body was strikingly out of proportion to her short legs.

  • I imagine what you have gone through, and she sympathetically turned up her eyes.

  • The two younger ones were embroidering: both were rosy and pretty and they differed only in that one had a little mole on her lip which made her much prettier.

  • She drew her wool down through the canvas and, scarcely able to refrain from laughing, stooped as if trying to make out the pattern.

  • She held a handkerchief to her eyes and her face was tearful.

  • "Oh, he is in a dreadful state," said the mother to her son when they were in the carriage.

  • After Anna Mikhaylovna had driven off with her son to visit Count Cyril Vladimirovich Bezukhov, Countess Rostova sat for a long time all alone applying her handkerchief to her eyes.

  • "What is the matter with you, my dear?" she said crossly to the maid who kept her waiting some minutes.

  • Her face became sad.

  • I want five hundred rubles, and taking out her cambric handkerchief she began wiping her husband's waistcoat.

  • "Annette, for heaven's sake don't refuse me," the countess began, with a blush that looked very strange on her thin, dignified, elderly face, and she took the money from under the handkerchief.

  • Anna Mikhaylovna instantly guessed her intention and stooped to be ready to embrace the countess at the appropriate moment.

  • Anna Mikhaylovna was already embracing her and weeping.

  • This was Lieutenant Berg, an officer in the Semenov regiment with whom Boris was to travel to join the army, and about whom Natasha had teased her elder sister Vera, speaking of Berg as her "intended."

  • The latter understood that she was being asked to entertain this young man, and sitting down beside him she began to speak about his father; but he answered her, as he had the countess, only in monosyllables.

  • "Marya Dmitrievna?" came her voice from there.

  • Tall and stout, holding high her fifty-year-old head with its gray curls, she stood surveying the guests, and leisurely arranged her wide sleeves as if rolling them up.

  • "Health and happiness to her whose name day we are keeping and to her children," she said, in her loud, full-toned voice which drowned all others.

  • "Well, you old sinner," she went on, turning to the count who was kissing her hand, "you're feeling dull in Moscow, I daresay?

  • (Marya Dmitrievna always called Natasha a Cossack) and she stroked the child's arm as she came up fearless and gay to kiss her hand.

  • She took a pair of pear-shaped ruby earrings from her huge reticule and, having given them to the rosy Natasha, who beamed with the pleasure of her saint's-day fete, turned away at once and addressed herself to Pierre.

  • "Come here, my friend..." and she ominously tucked up her sleeves still higher.

  • Pierre approached, looking at her in a childlike way through his spectacles.

  • She turned away and gave her hand to the count, who could hardly keep from laughing.

  • At one end of the table sat the countess with Marya Dmitrievna on her right and Anna Mikhaylovna on her left, the other lady visitors were farther down.

  • From behind the crystal decanters and fruit vases, the count kept glancing at his wife and her tall cap with its light-blue ribbons, and busily filled his neighbors' glasses, not neglecting his own.

  • The countess in turn, without omitting her duties as hostess, threw significant glances from behind the pineapples at her husband whose face and bald head seemed by their redness to contrast more than usual with his gray hair.

  • Sonya trembled all over and blushed to her ears and behind them and down to her neck and shoulders while Nicholas was speaking.

  • She half rose, by a glance inviting Pierre, who sat opposite, to listen to what was coming, and turning to her mother:

  • "Mamma!" rang out the clear contralto notes of her childish voice, audible the whole length of the table.

  • Marya Dmitrievna shook her fat finger.

  • I have asked, whispered Natasha to her little brother and to Pierre, glancing at him again.

  • She looked round and seeing that her friend was not in the room ran to look for her.

  • Sonya tried to lift her head to answer but could not, and hid her face still deeper in the bed.

  • Natasha wept, sitting on the blue-striped feather bed and hugging her friend.

  • With an effort Sonya sat up and began wiping her eyes and explaining.

  • "Nicholas is going away in a week's time, his... papers... have come... he told me himself... but still I should not cry," and she showed a paper she held in her hand--with the verses Nicholas had written, "still, I should not cry, but you can't... no one can understand... what a soul he has!"

  • God is my witness," and she made the sign of the cross, "I love her so much, and all of you, only Vera...

  • Sonya could not continue, and again hid her face in her hands and in the feather bed.

  • "Sonya," she suddenly exclaimed, as if she had guessed the true reason of her friend's sorrow, "I'm sure Vera has said something to you since dinner?

  • Natasha lifted her up, hugged her, and, smiling through her tears, began comforting her.

  • Sonya, don't believe her, darling!

  • "Don't you cry, Sonya, dear love, darling Sonya!" and she kissed her and laughed.

  • Nicholas will tell her himself, and he doesn't care at all for Julie.

  • Natasha kissed her on the hair.

  • Truly? she said, quickly smoothing her frock and hair.

  • "Really, truly!" answered Natasha, pushing in a crisp lock that had strayed from under her friend's plaits.

  • She had a fan in her hand that one of the ladies had given her to hold.

  • Assuming quite the pose of a society woman (heaven knows when and where she had learned it) she talked with her partner, fanning herself and smiling over the fan.

  • Just look at her! exclaimed the countess as she crossed the ballroom, pointing to Natasha.

  • "Look at Papa!" shouted Natasha to the whole company, and quite forgetting that she was dancing with a grown-up partner she bent her curly head to her knees and made the whole room ring with her laughter.

  • Her enormous figure stood erect, her powerful arms hanging down (she had handed her reticule to the countess), and only her stern but handsome face really joined in the dance.

  • Her enormous figure stood erect, her powerful arms hanging down (she had handed her reticule to the countess), and only her stern but handsome face really joined in the dance.

  • What was expressed by the whole of the count's plump figure, in Marya Dmitrievna found expression only in her more and more beaming face and quivering nose.

  • "That was a Daniel Cooper!" exclaimed Marya Dmitrievna, tucking up her sleeves and puffing heavily.

  • The second princess had just come from the sickroom with her eyes red from weeping and sat down beside Dr. Lorrain, who was sitting in a graceful pose under a portrait of Catherine, leaning his elbow on a table.

  • She rose and smoothed her hair, which was as usual so extremely smooth that it seemed to be made of one piece with her head and covered with varnish.

  • "I thought perhaps something had happened," she said with her unchanging stonily severe expression; and, sitting down opposite the prince, she prepared to listen.

  • "Well, my dear?" said Prince Vasili, taking her hand and bending it downwards as was his habit.

  • Then she shook her head and glanced up at the icons with a sigh.

  • The princess, holding her little dog on her lap with her thin bony hands, looked attentively into Prince Vasili's eyes evidently resolved not to be the first to break silence, if she had to wait till morning.

  • "I can tell you more," continued Prince Vasili, seizing her hand, "that letter was written, though it was not sent, and the Emperor knew of it.

  • "What next?" the princess interrupted, smiling sardonically and not changing the expression of her eyes.

  • She pushed the little dog off her lap and smoothed her dress.

  • The princess wished to rise, but the prince held her by the hand.

  • She gave her companion an angry glance.

  • "Who sacrificed everything for him," chimed in the princess, who would again have risen had not the prince still held her fast, "though he never could appreciate it.

  • But I will give her a piece of my mind.

  • As the wheels rolled softly over the straw beneath the windows, Anna Mikhaylovna, having turned with words of comfort to her companion, realized that he was asleep in his corner and woke him up.

  • "Ah, my friend!" she said, touching his arm as she had done her son's when speaking to him that afternoon, "believe me I suffer no less than you do, but be a man!"

  • "But really, hadn't I better go away?" he asked, looking kindly at her over his spectacles.

  • Seeing them pass, Prince Vasili drew back with obvious impatience, while the princess jumped up and with a gesture of desperation slammed the door with all her might.

  • With the air of a practical Petersburg lady she now, keeping Pierre close beside her, entered the room even more boldly than that afternoon.

  • She felt that as she brought with her the person the dying man wished to see, her own admission was assured.

  • Anna Mikhaylovna with just the same movement raised her shoulders and eyes, almost closing the latter, sighed, and moved away from the doctor to Pierre.

  • Anna Mikhaylovna, with a meek, sorrowful, and all-forgiving expression on her face, stood by the door near the strange lady.

  • She smiled, hid her face in her handkerchief, and remained with it hidden for awhile; then looking up and seeing Pierre she again began to laugh.

  • Anna Mikhaylovna stepped forward and, stooping over the dying man, beckoned to Lorrain from behind her back.

  • Pierre heard her say:

  • Anna Mikhaylovna made a hurried sign with her eyes, glancing at the sick man's hand and moving her lips as if to send it a kiss.

  • Pierre, carefully stretching his neck so as not to touch the quilt, followed her suggestion and pressed his lips to the large boned, fleshy hand.

  • Anna Mikhaylovna with her eyes indicated a chair that stood beside the bed.

  • "He is dozing," said Anna Mikhaylovna, observing that one of the princesses was coming to take her turn at watching.

  • "Permit me, Princess, to know what is necessary and what is not necessary," said the younger of the two speakers, evidently in the same state of excitement as when she had slammed the door of her room.

  • "I don't even know what is in this paper," said the younger of the two ladies, addressing Prince Vasili and pointing to an inlaid portfolio she held in her hand.

  • She tried to pass Anna Mikhaylovna, but the latter sprang so as to bar her path.

  • Their efforts in the struggle for the portfolio were the only sounds audible, but it was evident that if the princess did speak, her words would not be flattering to Anna Mikhaylovna.

  • Though the latter held on tenaciously, her voice lost none of its honeyed firmness and softness.

  • "Why don't you speak, cousin?" suddenly shrieked the princess so loud that those in the drawing room heard her and were startled.

  • Intriguer! she hissed viciously, and tugged with all her might at the portfolio.

  • But Anna Mikhaylovna went forward a step or two to keep her hold on the portfolio, and changed her grip.

  • At this moment that terrible door burst noisily open and banged against the wall.

  • Her sister dropped the portfolio.

  • A few minutes later the eldest sister came out with a pale hard face, again biting her underlip.

  • And bursting into tears she hid her face in her handkerchief and rushed from the room.

  • Pierre gave her an inquiring look.

  • She kissed the young man on his forehead, wetting him with her tears.

  • Pierre looked at her over his spectacles.

  • After her talk with Pierre, Anna Mikhaylovna returned to the Rostovs' and went to bed.

  • On waking in the morning she told the Rostovs and all her acquaintances the details of Count Bezukhov's death.

  • She took it quickly and bent her head over it.

  • Get used to it and you'll like it, and he patted her cheek.

  • She turned to go, but he stopped her with a gesture and took an uncut book from the high desk.

  • He patted her on the shoulder and himself closed the door after her.

  • Princess Mary went back to her room with the sad, scared expression that rarely left her and which made her plain, sickly face yet plainer.

  • She sat down at her writing table, on which stood miniature portraits and which was littered with books and papers.

  • The princess was as untidy as her father was tidy.

  • She put down the geometry book and eagerly broke the seal of her letter.

  • Having read thus far, Princess Mary sighed and glanced into the mirror which stood on her right.

  • Her eyes, always sad, now looked with particular hopelessness at her reflection in the glass.

  • Her eyes, always sad, now looked with particular hopelessness at her reflection in the glass.

  • But the princess never saw the beautiful expression of her own eyes--the look they had when she was not thinking of herself.

  • As with everyone, her face assumed a forced unnatural expression as soon as she looked in a glass.

  • The princess pondered awhile with a thoughtful smile and her luminous eyes lit up so that her face was entirely transformed.

  • Then she suddenly rose and with her heavy tread went up to the table.

  • She took a sheet of paper and her hand moved rapidly over it.

  • I have written to my poor mother, said the smiling Mademoiselle Bourienne rapidly, in her pleasant mellow tones and with guttural r's.

  • The princess glanced at her watch and, seeing that she was five minutes late in starting her practice on the clavichord, went into the sitting room with a look of alarm.

  • Prince Andrew got out of the carriage, helped his little wife to alight, and let her pass into the house before him.

  • The little princess had grown stouter during this time, but her eyes and her short, downy, smiling lip lifted when she began to speak just as merrily and prettily as ever.

  • "Why, this is a palace!" she said to her husband, looking around with the expression with which people compliment their host at a ball.

  • And with a glance round, she smiled at Tikhon, at her husband, and at the footman who accompanied them.

  • Let's go quietly and take her by surprise.

  • Prince Andrew followed her with a courteous but sad expression.

  • I must let her know.

  • Prince Andrew and his sister, hand in hand, kissed one another, and he told her she was still the same crybaby as ever.

  • Princess Mary had turned toward her brother, and through her tears the loving, warm, gentle look of her large luminous eyes, very beautiful at that moment, rested on Prince Andrew's face.

  • Princess Mary was still looking silently at her brother and her beautiful eyes were full of love and sadness.

  • It was plain that she was following a train of thought independent of her sister-in-law's words.

  • In the midst of a description of the last Petersburg fete she addressed her brother:

  • "Yes, and even tomorrow," replied her brother.

  • Princess Mary did not listen to the end, but continuing her train of thought turned to her sister-in-law with a tender glance at her figure.

  • She brought her face close to her sister-in-law's and unexpectedly again began to cry.

  • Take her to your room and I'll go to Father.

  • "The hours are the same, and the lathe, and also the mathematics and my geometry lessons," said Princess Mary gleefully, as if her lessons in geometry were among the greatest delights of her life.

  • Princess Mary will take her there and show her over, and they'll talk nineteen to the dozen.

  • He explained how an army, ninety thousand strong, was to threaten Prussia so as to bring her out of her neutrality and draw her into the war; how part of that army was to join some Swedish forces at Stralsund; how two hundred and twenty thousand Austrians, with a hundred thousand Russians, were to operate in Italy and on the Rhine; how fifty thousand Russians and as many English were to land at Naples, and how a total force of five hundred thousand men was to attack the French from different sides.

  • Princess Mary looked at her brother in surprise.

  • Everything her father did inspired her with reverence and was beyond question.

  • Princess Mary could not understand the boldness of her brother's criticism and was about to reply, when the expected footsteps were heard coming from the study.

  • He stroked her hair and then patted her awkwardly on the back of her neck.

  • "I'm glad, glad, to see you," he said, looking attentively into her eyes, and then quickly went to his place and sat down.

  • "Ho, ho!" said the old man, casting his eyes on her rounded figure.

  • The prince asked her about her father, and she began to smile and talk.

  • "Countess Apraksina, poor thing, has lost her husband and she has cried her eyes out," she said, growing more and more lively.

  • As she became animated the prince looked at her more and more sternly, and suddenly, as if he had studied her sufficiently and had formed a definite idea of her, he turned away and addressed Michael Ivanovich.

  • The little princess during the whole discussion and the rest of the dinner sat silent, glancing with a frightened look now at her father-in- law and now at Princess Mary.

  • When they left the table she took her sister-in-law's arm and drew her into another room.

  • The little princess was in her sister-in-law's room.

  • "And where is Lise?" he asked, answering her question only by a smile.

  • What a treasure of a wife you have, said she, sitting down on the sofa, facing her brother.

  • Don't forget that she has grown up and been educated in society, and so her position now is not a rosy one.

  • But think, Andrew: for a young society woman to be buried in the country during the best years of her life, all alone--for Papa is always busy, and I... well, you know what poor resources I have for entertaining a woman used to the best society.

  • To tell the truth, I don't need her, and she's even in my way.

  • Father likes her very much.

  • Father took her when she was homeless after losing her own father.

  • She is very good-natured, and my father likes her way of reading.

  • "You are good in every way, Andrew, but you have a kind of intellectual pride," said the princess, following the train of her own thoughts rather than the trend of the conversation--"and that's a great sin.

  • Her brother shook his head incredulously.

  • She looked timidly at her brother.

  • (She still did not take out what she was holding in her reticule.)

  • Rays of gentle light shone from her large, timid eyes.

  • Those eyes lit up the whole of her thin, sickly face and made it beautiful.

  • Her brother would have taken the icon, but she stopped him.

  • She is so sweet, so good- natured, and her position now is a very hard one.

  • The patches grew deeper on her forehead, neck, and cheeks.

  • Know this, Masha: I can't reproach, have not reproached, and never shall reproach my wife with anything, and I cannot reproach myself with anything in regard to her; and that always will be so in whatever circumstances I may be placed.

  • As he said this he rose, went to his sister, and, stooping, kissed her forehead.

  • His fine eyes lit up with a thoughtful, kindly, and unaccustomed brightness, but he was looking not at his sister but over her head toward the darkness of the open doorway.

  • Let us go to her, I must say good-by.

  • I thought you were in your room, she said, for some reason blushing and dropping her eyes.

  • Prince Andrew looked sternly at her and an expression of anger suddenly came over his face.

  • He said nothing to her but looked at her forehead and hair, without looking at her eyes, with such contempt that the Frenchwoman blushed and went away without a word.

  • When he reached his sister's room his wife was already awake and her merry voice, hurrying one word after another, came through the open door.

  • No, but imagine the old Countess Zubova, with false curls and her mouth full of false teeth, as if she were trying to cheat old age....

  • The little princess, plump and rosy, was sitting in an easy chair with her work in her hands, talking incessantly, repeating Petersburg reminiscences and even phrases.

  • Prince Andrew came up, stroked her hair, and asked if she felt rested after their journey.

  • She answered him and continued her chatter.

  • I am ashamed as it is to leave her on your hands...

  • When her confinement is due, send to Moscow for an accoucheur....

  • "I know that no one can help if nature does not do her work," said Prince Andrew, evidently confused.

  • I know that out of a million cases only one goes wrong, but it is her fancy and mine.

  • They have been telling her things.

  • "Andrew, already!" said the little princess, turning pale and looking with dismay at her husband.

  • He cautiously released the shoulder she leaned on, looked into her face, and carefully placed her in an easy chair.

  • "Adieu, Mary," said he gently to his sister, taking her by the hand and kissing her, and then he left the room with rapid steps.

  • The little princess lay in the armchair, Mademoiselle Bourienne chafing her temples.

  • Princess Mary, supporting her sister-in-law, still looked with her beautiful eyes full of tears at the door through which Prince Andrew had gone and made the sign of the cross in his direction.

  • "She let the hawk fly upward from her wide right sleeve," went the song, arousing an involuntary sensation of courage and cheerfulness.

  • The Empress' chamberlain invited him to see Her Majesty.

  • Seeing Prince Andrew she leaned out from behind the apron and, waving her thin arms from under the woolen shawl, cried:

  • He saw that his championship of the doctor's wife in her queer trap might expose him to what he dreaded more than anything in the world--to ridicule; but his instinct urged him on.

  • For a moment he dozed, but in that short interval innumerable things appeared to him in a dream: his mother and her large white hand, Sonya's thin little shoulders, Natasha's eyes and laughter, Denisov with his voice and mustache, and Telyanin and all that affair with Telyanin and Bogdanich.

  • Touched that this statuesque princess could so change, Pierre took her hand and begged her forgiveness, without knowing what for.

  • Prince Vasili had come to the conclusion that it was necessary to throw this bone--a bill for thirty thousand rubles--to the poor princess that it might not occur to her to speak of his share in the affair of the inlaid portfolio.

  • The younger sisters also became affectionate to him, especially the youngest, the pretty one with the mole, who often made him feel confused by her smiles and her own confusion when meeting him.

  • Anna Pavlovna arranged the different groups in her drawing room with her habitual skill.

  • Go and keep her company for ten minutes.

  • It comes from her heart.

  • With her the least worldly of men would occupy a most brilliant position in society.

  • Pierre, in reply, sincerely agreed with her as to Helene's perfection of manner.

  • If he ever thought of Helene, it was just of her beauty and her remarkable skill in appearing silently dignified in society.

  • The old aunt received the two young people in her corner, but seemed desirous of hiding her adoration for Helene and inclined rather to show her fear of Anna Pavlovna.

  • She looked at her niece, as if inquiring what she was to do with these people.

  • Helene smiled, with a look implying that she did not admit the possibility of anyone seeing her without being enchanted.

  • The aunt was just speaking of a collection of snuffboxes that had belonged to Pierre's father, Count Bezukhov, and showed them her own box.

  • He was conscious of the warmth of her body, the scent of perfume, and the creaking of her corset as she moved.

  • He did not see her marble beauty forming a complete whole with her dress, but all the charm of her body only covered by her garments.

  • Yes, I am a woman who may belong to anyone--to you too, said her glance.

  • He had merely understood that the woman he had known as a child, of whom when her beauty was mentioned he had said absent-mindedly: "Yes, she's good looking," he had understood that this woman might belong to him.

  • Hippolyte is her brother...

  • Prince Vasili is her father...

  • And he again saw her not as the daughter of Prince Vasili, but visualized her whole body only veiled by its gray dress.

  • He recalled her former words and looks and the words and looks of those who had seen them together.

  • But at the very time he was expressing this conviction to himself, in another part of his mind her image rose in all its womanly beauty.

  • I am her father.

  • Every day he said to himself one and the same thing: It is time I understood her and made up my mind what she really is.

  • On either side of her sat the more important guests--an old general and his wife, and Anna Pavlovna Scherer.

  • At one end of the table, the old chamberlain was heard assuring an old baroness that he loved her passionately, at which she laughed; at the other could be heard the story of the misfortunes of some Mary Viktorovna or other.

  • "Don't be unkind," cried Anna Pavlovna from her end of the table holding up a threatening finger.

  • Anna Pavlovna threatened him on behalf of "our dear Vyazmitinov," and in her eyes, which, for an instant, glanced at Pierre, Prince Vasili read a congratulation on his future son-in-law and on his daughter's happiness.

  • The old princess sighed sadly as she offered some wine to the old lady next to her and glanced angrily at her daughter, and her sigh seemed to say: "Yes, there's nothing left for you and me but to sip sweet wine, my dear, now that the time has come for these young ones to be thus boldly, provocatively happy."

  • Now I know that not because of her alone, nor of myself alone, but because of everyone, it must inevitably come about.

  • Then I played cards with her and picked up her reticule and drove out with her.

  • And here he was sitting by her side as her betrothed, seeing, hearing, feeling her nearness, her breathing, her movements, her beauty.

  • Some, as if unwilling to distract her from an important occupation, came up to her for a moment and made haste to go away, refusing to let her see them off.

  • "I think I may congratulate you," whispered Anna Pavlovna to the old princess, kissing her soundly.

  • The old princess did not reply, she was tormented by jealousy of her daughter's happiness.

  • He had often before, during the last six weeks, remained alone with her, but had never spoken to her of love.

  • But, as he had to say something, he began by asking her whether she was satisfied with the party.

  • "Well, Lelya?" he asked, turning instantly to his daughter and addressing her with the careless tone of habitual tenderness natural to parents who have petted their children from babyhood, but which Prince Vasili had only acquired by imitating other parents.

  • The sight of the discomposure of that old man of the world touched Pierre: he looked at Helene and she too seemed disconcerted, and her look seemed to say: "Well, it is your own fault."

  • "Still the same," she said to her husband.

  • The elderly lady was using her handkerchief too.

  • Pierre held the hand of his betrothed in silence, looking at her beautiful bosom as it rose and fell.

  • He looked at her face.

  • He was about to stoop over her hand and kiss it, but with a rapid, almost brutal movement of her head, she intercepted his lips and met them with her own.

  • Her face struck Pierre, by its altered, unpleasantly excited expression.

  • "It is too late now, it's done; besides I love her," thought Pierre.

  • It is natural in her state.

  • When the little princess had grown accustomed to life at Bald Hills, she took a special fancy to Mademoiselle Bourienne, spent whole days with her, asked her to sleep in her room, and often talked with her about the old prince and criticized him.

  • "So we are to have visitors, mon prince?" remarked Mademoiselle Bourienne, unfolding her white napkin with her rosy fingers.

  • The little princess was sitting at a small table, chattering with Masha, her maid.

  • She grew pale on seeing her father-in-law.

  • Her cheeks had sunk, her lip was drawn up, and her eyes drawn down.

  • Her cheeks had sunk, her lip was drawn up, and her eyes drawn down.

  • And why not marry her if she really has so much money?

  • Princess Mary was sitting alone in her room, vainly trying to master her agitation.

  • The mere thought of her father's look filled her with terror.

  • She was no longer in the loose gown she generally wore in the morning, but had on one of her best dresses.

  • Princess Mary's self-esteem was wounded by the fact that the arrival of a suitor agitated her, and still more so by both her companions' not having the least conception that it could be otherwise.

  • To tell them that she felt ashamed for herself and for them would be to betray her agitation, while to decline their offers to dress her would prolong their banter and insistence.

  • She flushed, her beautiful eyes grew dim, red blotches came on her face, and it took on the unattractive martyrlike expression it so often wore, as she submitted herself to Mademoiselle Bourienne and Lise.

  • Both these women quite sincerely tried to make her look pretty.

  • "No, it will not do," she said decidedly, clasping her hands.

  • Katie," she said to the maid, "bring the princess her gray dress, and you'll see, Mademoiselle Bourienne, how I shall arrange it," she added, smiling with a foretaste of artistic pleasure.

  • Her voice sounded so serious and so sad that the chirping of the birds was silenced at once.

  • This expression in Princess Mary did not frighten them (she never inspired fear in anyone), but they knew that when it appeared on her face, she became mute and was not to be shaken in her determination.

  • She did not comply with Lise's request, she not only left her hair as it was, but did not even look in her glass.

  • Letting her arms fall helplessly, she sat with downcast eyes and pondered.

  • She fancied a child, her own--such as she had seen the day before in the arms of her nurse's daughter--at her own breast, the husband standing by and gazing tenderly at her and the child.

  • A painful doubt filled her soul.

  • In her thoughts of marriage Princess Mary dreamed of happiness and of children, but her strongest, most deeply hidden longing was for earthly love.

  • And scarcely had she put that question than God gave her the answer in her own heart.

  • When she entered with her heavy step, treading on her heels, the gentlemen and Mademoiselle Bourienne rose and the little princess, indicating her to the gentlemen, said: "Voila Marie!"

  • She saw Prince Vasili's face, serious for an instant at the sight of her, but immediately smiling again, and the little princess curiously noting the impression "Marie" produced on the visitors.

  • And she saw Mademoiselle Bourienne, with her ribbon and pretty face, and her unusually animated look which was fixed on him, but him she could not see, she only saw something large, brilliant, and handsome moving toward her as she entered the room.

  • Prince Vasili approached first, and she kissed the bold forehead that bent over her hand and answered his question by saying that, on the contrary, she remembered him quite well.

  • She only felt a soft hand taking hers firmly, and she touched with her lips a white forehead, over which was beautiful light- brown hair smelling of pomade.

  • Anatole stood with his right thumb under a button of his uniform, his chest expanded and his back drawn in, slightly swinging one foot, and, with his head a little bent, looked with beaming face at the princess without speaking and evidently not thinking about her at all.

  • The conversation was general and animated, thanks to Princess Lise's voice and little downy lip that lifted over her white teeth.

  • Prince Vasili readily adopted her tone and the little princess also drew Anatole, whom she hardly knew, into these amusing recollections of things that had never occurred.

  • Oh!" and she shook her finger at him, "I have even heard of your doings in Paris!"

  • "And didn't Hippolyte tell you?" asked Prince Vasili, turning to his son and seizing the little princess' arm as if she would have run away and he had just managed to catch her, "didn't he tell you how he himself was pining for the dear princess, and how she showed him the door?

  • When Paris was mentioned, Mademoiselle Bourienne for her part seized the opportunity of joining in the general current of recollections.

  • Anatole answered the Frenchwoman very readily and, looking at her with a smile, talked to her about her native land.

  • "Not at all bad!" he thought, examining her, "not at all bad, that little companion!

  • The question was whether he could ever bring himself to part from his daughter and give her to a husband.

  • Life without Princess Mary, little as he seemed to value her, was unthinkable to him.

  • They'll take her for her connections and wealth.

  • "Well, do you think I shall prevent her, that I can't part from her?" said the old prince angrily.

  • I will ask her tomorrow in your presence; if she is willing, then he can stay on.

  • "Let her marry, it's all the same to me!" he screamed in the same piercing tone as when parting from his son.

  • Princess Mary grew quite unconscious of her face and coiffure.

  • The handsome open face of the man who might perhaps be her husband absorbed all her attention.

  • He seemed to her kind, brave, determined, manly, and magnanimous.

  • Thousands of dreams of a future family life continually rose in her imagination.

  • Of course, she, a handsome young woman without any definite position, without relations or even a country, did not intend to devote her life to serving Prince Bolkonski, to reading aloud to him and being friends with Princess Mary.

  • Mademoiselle Bourienne knew a story, heard from her aunt but finished in her own way, which she liked to repeat to herself.

  • Mademoiselle Bourienne was often touched to tears as in imagination she told this story to him, her seducer.

  • He would carry her away and then sa pauvre mere would appear and he would marry her.

  • So her future shaped itself in Mademoiselle Bourienne's head at the very time she was talking to Anatole about Paris.

  • The little princess, like an old war horse that hears the trumpet, unconsciously and quite forgetting her condition, prepared for the familiar gallop of coquetry, without any ulterior motive or any struggle, but with naive and lighthearted gaiety.

  • Anatole, laughing and in high spirits, came and leaned on his elbows, facing her and beside Mademoiselle Bourienne.

  • Her favorite sonata bore her into a most intimately poetic world and the look she felt upon her made that world still more poetic.

  • Her favorite sonata bore her into a most intimately poetic world and the look she felt upon her made that world still more poetic.

  • But Anatole's expression, though his eyes were fixed on her, referred not to her but to the movements of Mademoiselle Bourienne's little foot, which he was then touching with his own under the clavichord.

  • She did not know how she found the courage, but she looked straight into his handsome face as it came near to her shortsighted eyes.

  • "Is it possible that Amelie" (Mademoiselle Bourienne) "thinks I could be jealous of her, and not value her pure affection and devotion to me?"

  • She went up to her and kissed her warmly.

  • She feared to look round, it seemed to her that someone was there standing behind the screen in the dark corner.

  • She rang for her maid and asked her to sleep in her room.

  • The little princess grumbled to her maid that her bed was badly made.

  • She could not lie either on her face or on her side.

  • She sat in an armchair in her dressing jacket and nightcap and Katie, sleepy and disheveled, beat and turned the heavy feather bed for the third time, muttering to herself.

  • "I should be glad enough to fall asleep, so it's not my fault!" and her voice quivered like that of a child about to cry.

  • The first man that turns up--she forgets her father and everything else, runs upstairs and does up her hair and wags her tail and is unlike herself!

  • Glad to throw her father over!

  • She must be shown that the blockhead thinks nothing of her and looks only at Bourienne.

  • The old prince knew that if he told his daughter she was making a mistake and that Anatole meant to flirt with Mademoiselle Bourienne, Princess Mary's self-esteem would be wounded and his point (not to be parted from her) would be gained, so pacifying himself with this thought, he called Tikhon and began to undress.

  • When Princess Mary went to her father's room at the usual hour, Mademoiselle Bourienne and Anatole met in the conservatory.

  • Princess Mary well knew this painstaking expression of her father's.

  • He came to the point at once, treating her ceremoniously.

  • "How understand me!" cried her father angrily.

  • She lowered her head and was ready to burst into tears.

  • Her fate was decided and happily decided.

  • But what her father had said about Mademoiselle Bourienne was dreadful.

  • She raised her eyes, and two steps away saw Anatole embracing the Frenchwoman and whispering something to her.

  • When Tikhon came to her Princess Mary was sitting on the sofa in her room, holding the weeping Mademoiselle Bourienne in her arms and gently stroking her hair.

  • "Ah, my dear, my dear!" he began, rising and taking her by both hands.

  • I don't wish to marry, she answered positively, glancing at Prince Vasili and at her father with her beautiful eyes.

  • If he is not rich I will give her the means; I will ask my father and Andrew.

  • Anna Mikhaylovna, though her circumstances had improved, was still living with the Rostovs.

  • Anna Mikhaylovna sat down beside him, with her own handkerchief wiped the tears from his eyes and from the letter, then having dried her own eyes she comforted the count, and decided that at dinner and till teatime she would prepare the countess, and after tea, with God's help, would inform her.

  • After dinner, she rushed head long after Anna Mikhaylovna and, dashing at her, flung herself on her neck as soon as she overtook her in the sitting room.

  • Anna Mikhaylovna shook her head.

  • Anna Mikhaylovna, in a few words, told her the contents of the letter, on condition that she should tell no one.

  • Natasha, seeing the impression the news of her brother's wound produced on Sonya, felt for the first time the sorrowful side of the news.

  • She rushed to Sonya, hugged her, and began to cry.

  • Natasha smiled through her tears.

  • "No, Sonya, but do you remember so that you remember him perfectly, remember everything?" said Natasha, with an expressive gesture, evidently wishing to give her words a very definite meaning.

  • (She shut her eyes.)

  • Now that he was already an officer and a wounded hero, would it be right to remind him of herself and, as it might seem, of the obligations to her he had taken on himself?

  • On retiring to her own room, she sat in an armchair, her eyes fixed on a miniature portrait of her son on the lid of a snuffbox, while the tears kept coming into her eyes.

  • Her face wore the proud expression of a surgeon who has just performed a difficult operation and admits the public to appreciate his skill.

  • "It is done!" she said to the count, pointing triumphantly to the countess, who sat holding in one hand the snuffbox with its portrait and in the other the letter, and pressing them alternately to her lips.

  • When she saw the count, she stretched out her arms to him, embraced his bald head, over which she again looked at the letter and the portrait, and in order to press them again to her lips, she slightly pushed away the bald head.

  • When she heard this Sonya blushed so that tears came into her eyes and, unable to bear the looks turned upon her, ran away into the dancing hall, whirled round it at full speed with her dress puffed out like a balloon, and, flushed and smiling, plumped down on the floor.

  • This was quite true, but the count, the countess, and Natasha looked at her reproachfully.

  • Nicholas' letter was read over hundreds of times, and those who were considered worthy to hear it had to come to the countess, for she did not let it out of her hands.

  • How strange, how extraordinary, how joyful it seemed, that her son, the scarcely perceptible motion of whose tiny limbs she had felt twenty years ago within her, that son about whom she used to have quarrels with the too indulgent count, that son who had first learned to say "pear" and then "granny," that this son should now be away in a foreign land amid strange surroundings, a manly warrior doing some kind of man's work of his own, without help or guidance.

  • As twenty years before, it seemed impossible that the little creature who lived somewhere under her heart would ever cry, suck her breast, and begin to speak, so now she could not believe that that little creature could be this strong, brave man, this model son and officer that, judging by this letter, he now was.

  • Anna Mikhaylovna, practical woman that she was, had even managed by favor with army authorities to secure advantageous means of communication for herself and her son.

  • She had opportunities of sending her letters to the Grand Duke Constantine Pavlovich, who commanded the Guards.

  • The German landlady, hearing Rostov's loud voice, popped her head in at the door.

  • He thought of her pregnancy and felt sorry for her and for himself, and in a nervously emotional and softened mood he went out of the hut in which he was billeted with Nesvitski and began to walk up and down before it.

  • (Won't she be surprised when I tell her how I've seen the Emperor?)

  • The soldiers who had carried Prince Andrew had noticed and taken the little gold icon Princess Mary had hung round her brother's neck, but seeing the favor the Emperor showed the prisoners, they now hastened to return the holy image.

  • Natasha, after she had pulled him down toward her and covered his face with kisses, holding him tight by the skirt of his coat, sprang away and pranced up and down in one place like a goat and shrieked piercingly.

  • She gazed at him, not taking her eyes off him, and smiling and holding her breath.

  • He gave her a grateful look, but was still expectant and looking for someone.

  • She could not lift her face, but only pressed it to the cold braiding of his hussar's jacket.

  • "Darling Denisov!" screamed Natasha, beside herself with rapture, springing to him, putting her arms round him, and kissing him.

  • Natasha had put on one spurred boot and was just getting her foot into the other.

  • Sonya, when he came in, was twirling round and was about to expand her dresses into a balloon and sit down.

  • Sonya ran away, but Natasha, taking her brother's arm, led him into the sitting room, where they began talking.

  • How are you going to speak to her-- thou or you?

  • No, call her you, please!

  • Such a friend that I burned my arm for her sake.

  • She pulled up her muslin sleeve and showed him a red scar on her long, slender, delicate arm, high above the elbow on that part that is covered even by a ball dress.

  • It makes it as if you were marrying her because you must, and that wouldn't do at all.

  • Sonya had already struck him by her beauty on the preceding day.

  • Today, when he had caught a glimpse of her, she seemed still more lovely.

  • Why should he not love her now, and even marry her, Rostov thought, but just now there were so many other pleasures and interests before him!

  • Curving her arms, Natasha held out her skirts as dancers do, ran back a few steps, turned, cut a caper, brought her little feet sharply together, and made some steps on the very tips of her toes.

  • See! she said, but could not maintain herself on her toes any longer.

  • He kissed her hand and addressed her not as thou but as you--Sonya.

  • Her looks asked him to forgive her for having dared, by Natasha's intermediacy, to remind him of his promise, and then thanked him for his love.

  • Her looks asked him to forgive her for having dared, by Natasha's intermediacy, to remind him of his promise, and then thanked him for his love.

  • His looks thanked her for offering him his freedom and told her that one way or another he would never cease to love her, for that would be impossible.

  • Vera's remark was correct, as her remarks always were, but, like most of her observations, it made everyone feel uncomfortable, not only Sonya, Nicholas, and Natasha, but even the old countess, who--dreading this love affair which might hinder Nicholas from making a brilliant match-- blushed like a girl.

  • Though she came upon the count in his dressing gown every day, he invariably became confused and begged her to excuse his costume.

  • "No matter at all, my dear count," she said, meekly closing her eyes.

  • Anna Mikhaylovna turned up her eyes, and profound sadness was depicted on her face.

  • "Dolokhov, Mary Ivanovna's son," she said in a mysterious whisper, "has compromised her completely, they say.

  • Involuntarily recalling his wife's past and her relations with Dolokhov, Pierre saw clearly that what was said in the letter might be true, or might at least seem to be true had it not referred to his wife.

  • He hated her and was forever sundered from her.

  • I have killed her lover, yes, killed my wife's lover.

  • How did I come to do it?"--"Because you married her," answered an inner voice.

  • In marrying her without loving her; in deceiving yourself and her.

  • Anatole used to come to borrow money from her and used to kiss her naked shoulders.

  • One day I asked her if she felt any symptoms of pregnancy.

  • "Yes, I never loved her," said he to himself; "I knew she was a depraved woman," he repeated, "but dared not admit it to myself.

  • "It is all, all her fault," he said to himself; "but what of that?

  • Why did I say 'Je vous aime' to her, which was a lie, and worse than a lie?

  • But at the moment when he imagined himself calmed by such reflections, she suddenly came into his mind as she was at the moments when he had most strongly expressed his insincere love for her, and he felt the blood rush to his heart and had again to get up and move about and break and tear whatever came to his hand.

  • "Why did I tell her that 'Je vous aime'?" he kept repeating to himself.

  • He could not imagine how he could speak to her now.

  • He resolved to go away next day and leave a letter informing her of his intention to part from her forever.

  • With her imperturbable calm she did not begin to speak in front of the valet.

  • Helene laughed, "that Dolokhov was my lover," she said in French with her coarse plainness of speech, uttering the word amant as casually as any other word, "and you believed it!

  • Helene raised her voice and became more and more excited, "A man who's a better man than you in every way..."

  • "Hm... Hm...!" growled Pierre, frowning without looking at her, and not moving a muscle.

  • Pierre wished to say something, looked at her with eyes whose strange expression she did not understand, and lay down again.

  • "I'll kill you!" he shouted, and seizing the marble top of a table with a strength he had never before felt, he made a step toward her brandishing the slab.

  • He flung down the slab, broke it, and swooping down on her with outstretched hands shouted, "Get out!" in such a terrible voice that the whole house heard it with horror.

  • Her eyes grew dim.

  • She was already pale, but on hearing these words her face changed and something brightened in her beautiful, radiant eyes.

  • She forgot all fear of her father, went up to him, took his hand, and drawing him down put her arm round his thin, scraggy neck.

  • The princess sank helplessly into an armchair beside her father and wept.

  • "Father, tell me how it happened," she asked through her tears.

  • It was evident that her eyes did not see Princess Mary but were looking within... into herself... at something joyful and mysterious taking place within her.

  • She took her sister-in-law's hand and held it below her waist.

  • Her eyes were smiling expectantly, her downy lip rose and remained lifted in childlike happiness.

  • Her eyes were smiling expectantly, her downy lip rose and remained lifted in childlike happiness.

  • Princess Mary knelt down before her and hid her face in the folds of her sister-in-law's dress.

  • Princess Mary could not lift her head, she was weeping.

  • "Nothing... only I feel sad... sad about Andrew," she said, wiping away her tears on her sister-in-law's knee.

  • Several times in the course of the morning Princess Mary began trying to prepare her sister-in-law, and every time began to cry.

  • She looked at Princess Mary, then sat thinking for a while with that expression of attention to something within her that is only seen in pregnant women, and suddenly began to cry.

  • "Nothing," answered Princess Mary, looking firmly with her radiant eyes at her sister-in-law.

  • She had determined not to tell her and persuaded her father to hide the terrible news from her till after her confinement, which was expected within a few days.

  • She prayed for her brother as living and was always awaiting news of his return.

  • Oh, you are very pale! said Princess Mary in alarm, running with her soft, ponderous steps up to her sister-in-law.

  • And the little princess began to cry capriciously like a suffering child and to wring her little hands even with some affectation.

  • The midwife was already on her way to meet her, rubbing her small, plump white hands with an air of calm importance.

  • "Well, the Lord be thanked, Princess," said Mary Bogdanovna, not hastening her steps.

  • Five minutes later Princess Mary from her room heard something heavy being carried by.

  • Princess Mary sat alone in her room listening to the sounds in the house, now and then opening her door when someone passed and watching what was going on in the passage.

  • She did not venture to ask any questions, and shut the door again, now sitting down in her easy chair, now taking her prayer book, now kneeling before the icon stand.

  • To her surprise and distress she found that her prayers did not calm her excitement.

  • Suddenly her door opened softly and her old nurse, Praskovya Savishna, who hardly ever came to that room as the old prince had forbidden it, appeared on the threshold with a shawl round her head.

  • The nurse lit the gilt candles before the icons and sat down by the door with her knitting.

  • Everyone in the house was dominated by the same feeling that Princess Mary experienced as she sat in her room.

  • The old prince, stepping on his heels, paced up and down his study and sent Tikhon to ask Mary Bogdanovna what news.--"Say only that 'the prince told me to ask,' and come and tell me her answer."

  • Nurse Savishna, knitting in hand, was telling in low tones, scarcely hearing or understanding her own words, what she had told hundreds of times before: how the late princess had given birth to Princess Mary in Kishenev with only a Moldavian peasant woman to help instead of a midwife.

  • Princess Mary shuddered; her nurse, putting down the stocking she was knitting, went to the window and leaning out tried to catch the open casement.

  • The cold wind flapped the ends of her kerchief and her loose locks of gray hair.

  • Princess Mary threw a shawl over her head and ran to meet the newcomer.

  • The little princess lay supported by pillows, with a white cap on her head (the pains had just left her).

  • Strands of her black hair lay round her inflamed and perspiring cheeks, her charming rosy mouth with its downy lip was open and she was smiling joyfully.

  • Prince Andrew entered and paused facing her at the foot of the sofa on which she was lying.

  • Her glittering eyes, filled with childlike fear and excitement, rested on him without changing their expression.

  • Help me! her look seemed to say.

  • She saw her husband, but did not realize the significance of his appearance before her now.

  • Prince Andrew went round the sofa and kissed her forehead.

  • "My darling!" he said--a word he had never used to her before.

  • "I expected help from you and I get none, none from you either!" said her eyes.

  • His coming had nothing to do with her sufferings or with their relief.

  • She was lying dead, in the same position he had seen her in five minutes before and, despite the fixed eyes and the pallor of the cheeks, the same expression was on her charming childlike face with its upper lip covered with tiny black hair.

  • "I love you all, and have done no harm to anyone; and what have you done to me?"--said her charming, pathetic, dead face.

  • Three days later the little princess was buried, and Prince Andrew went up the steps to where the coffin stood, to give her the farewell kiss.

  • The old man too came up and kissed the waxen little hands that lay quietly crossed one on the other on her breast, and to him, too, her face seemed to say: "Ah, what have you done to me, and why?"

  • The wet nurse supported the coverlet with her chin, while the priest with a goose feather anointed the boy's little red and wrinkled soles and palms.

  • She almost quarreled with her brother about him.

  • He was pointedly attentive to Sonya and looked at her in such a way that not only could she not bear his glances without coloring, but even the old countess and Natasha blushed when they saw his looks.

  • He called Natasha and asked her what was the matter.

  • From the point of view of the old countess and of society it was out of the question for her to refuse him.

  • He tried to say, "That's capital; of course she'll forget her childish promises and accept the offer," but before he had time to say it Natasha began again.

  • Much as Mamma pressed her, she refused, and I know she won't change once she has said...

  • "And Mamma pressed her!" said Nicholas reproachfully.

  • I'll send her to you.

  • And Natasha kissed her brother and ran away.

  • Nicholas went up to her and kissed her hand.

  • And Nicholas again kissed her hand.

  • That evening, proud of Dolokhov's proposal, her refusal, and her explanation with Nicholas, Sonya twirled about before she left home so that the maid could hardly get her hair plaited, and she was transparently radiant with impulsive joy.

  • Natasha no less proud of her first long dress and of being at a real ball was even happier.

  • Noiselessly, skillfully stepping with his little feet in low shoes, Iogel flew first across the hall with Natasha, who, though shy, went on carefully executing her steps.

  • Denisov did not take his eyes off her and beat time with his saber in a way that clearly indicated that if he was not dancing it was because he would not and not because he could not.

  • When it came to Natasha's turn to choose a partner, she rose and, tripping rapidly across in her little shoes trimmed with bows, ran timidly to the corner where Denisov sat.

  • She saw that everybody was looking at her and waiting.

  • First he spun her round, holding her now with his left, now with his right hand, then falling on one knee he twirled her round him, and again jumping up, dashed so impetuously forward that it seemed as if he would rush through the whole suite of rooms without drawing breath, and then he suddenly stopped and performed some new and unexpected steps.

  • When at last, smartly whirling his partner round in front of her chair, he drew up with a click of his spurs and bowed to her, Natasha did not even make him a curtsy.

  • She fixed her eyes on him in amazement, smiling as if she did not recognize him.

  • Denisov, flushed after the mazurka and mopping himself with his handkerchief, sat down by Natasha and did not leave her for the rest of the evening.

  • "My cousin has nothing to do with this and it's not necessary to mention her!" he exclaimed fiercely.

  • The old countess, waiting for the return of her husband and son, sat playing patience with the old gentlewoman who lived in their house.

  • Nicholas went to her, kissed her hand, and sitting down silently at her table began to watch her hands arranging the cards.

  • The countess glanced at her silent son.

  • Denisov was looking at her with enraptured eyes.

  • Why do they want to make her sing?

  • Natasha too, with her quick instinct, had instantly noticed her brother's condition.

  • Natasha took the first note, her throat swelled, her chest rose, her eyes became serious.

  • At that moment she was oblivious of her surroundings, and from her smiling lips flowed sounds which anyone may produce at the same intervals and hold for the same time, but which leave you cold a thousand times and the thousand and first time thrill you and make you weep.

  • Natasha, that winter, had for the first time begun to sing seriously, mainly because Denisov so delighted in her singing.

  • "What is this?" thought Nicholas, listening to her with widely opened eyes.

  • But no sooner had Natasha finished her barcarolle than reality again presented itself.

  • Natasha came running to her mother, quite excited.

  • The countess did not believe her ears.

  • The countess shrugged her shoulders.

  • He jumped up at the sound of her light step.

  • "Nataly," he said, moving with rapid steps toward her, "decide my fate.

  • Denisov bent over her hand and she heard strange sounds she did not understand.

  • He looked at the countess, and seeing her severe face said: "Well, good-by, Countess," and kissing her hand, he left the room with quick resolute strides, without looking at Natasha.

  • It was as if she wanted to show him that his losses were an achievement that made her love him all the more, but Nicholas now considered himself unworthy of her.

  • "I have hundreds of rubles I don't know what to do with, and she stands in her tattered cloak looking timidly at me," he thought.

  • "And why did she resist her seducer when she loved him?" he thought.

  • God could not have put into her heart an impulse that was against His will.

  • This gift will be a pledge of your purity of heart to her whom you select to be your worthy helpmeet in Masonry.

  • But consider the position in which you are placing her and me in the eyes of society, and even of the court, he added, lowering his voice.

  • Let us write her a letter at once, and she'll come here and all will be explained, or else, my dear boy, let me tell you it's quite likely you'll have to suffer for it.

  • And when after Pierre's departure Helene returned to Petersburg, she was received by all her acquaintances not only cordially, but even with a shade of deference due to her misfortune.

  • This expression suggested that she had resolved to endure her troubles uncomplainingly and that her husband was a cross laid upon her by God.

  • The novelty Anna Pavlovna was setting before her guests that evening was Boris Drubetskoy, who had just arrived as a special messenger from the Prussian army and was aide-de-camp to a very important personage.

  • Anna Pavlovna gave him her shriveled hand to kiss and introduced him to several persons whom he did not know, giving him a whispered description of each.

  • For some time he engrossed the general attention, and Anna Pavlovna felt that the novelty she had served up was received with pleasure by all her visitors.

  • As soon as he had finished she turned to him with her usual smile.

  • "You know her husband, of course?" said Anna Pavlovna, closing her eyes and indicating Helene with a sorrowful gesture.

  • Don't mention him before her--please don't!

  • "It is the sword of Frederick the Great which I..." she began, but Hippolyte interrupted her with the words: "Le Roi de Prusse..." and again, as soon as all turned toward him, excused himself and said no more.

  • "Your joke is too bad, it's witty but unjust," said Anna Pavlovna, shaking her little shriveled finger at him.

  • When everybody rose to go, Helene who had spoken very little all the evening again turned to Boris, asking him in a tone of caressing significant command to come to her on Tuesday.

  • There were other guests and the countess talked little to him, and only as he kissed her hand on taking leave said unexpectedly and in a whisper, with a strangely unsmiling face: Come to dinner tomorrow... in the evening.

  • Princess Mary had ceased taking lessons in mathematics from her father, and when the old prince was at home went to his study with the wet nurse and little Prince Nicholas (as his grandfather called him).

  • The baby Prince Nicholas lived with his wet nurse and nurse Savishna in the late princess' rooms and Princess Mary spent most of the day in the nursery, taking a mother's place to her little nephew as best she could.

  • Mademoiselle Bourienne, too, seemed passionately fond of the boy, and Princess Mary often deprived herself to give her friend the pleasure of dandling the little angel--as she called her nephew--and playing with him.

  • "My dear," said Princess Mary, addressing her brother from beside the cot where she was standing, "better wait a bit... later..."

  • I think so... but as you please, said Princess Mary, evidently intimidated and confused that her opinion had prevailed.

  • She drew her brother's attention to the maid who was calling him in a whisper.

  • But he scowled at her angrily though also with suffering in his eyes, and stooped glass in hand over the infant.

  • Princess Mary shrugged her shoulders but took the glass submissively and calling the nurse began giving the medicine.

  • "My dear," he heard what seemed to him her despairing whisper behind him.

  • Prince Andrew recognized her without looking and held out his hand to her.

  • In the dim shadow of the curtain her luminous eyes shone more brightly than usual from the tears of joy that were in them.

  • She leaned over to her brother and kissed him, slightly catching the curtain of the cot.

  • But of course you know her already, he said, evidently trying to entertain a visitor with whom he now found nothing in common.

  • "When you see my sister, Princess Mary, you'll get on with her," he said.

  • A woman, bent with age, with a wallet on her back, and a short, long-haired, young man in a black garment had rushed back to the gate on seeing the carriage driving up.

  • It will serve her right, she will be confused, but you will see her 'God's folk.'

  • Princess Mary really was disconcerted and red patches came on her face when they went in.

  • In her snug room, with lamps burning before the icon stand, a young lad with a long nose and long hair, wearing a monk's cassock, sat on the sofa beside her, behind a samovar.

  • Near them, in an armchair, sat a thin, shriveled, old woman, with a meek expression on her childlike face.

  • "Andrew, why didn't you warn me?" said the princess, with mild reproach, as she stood before her pilgrims like a hen before her chickens.

  • She looked at him with her beautiful radiant eyes and seemed to say, "I like you very much, but please don't laugh at my people."

  • Princess Mary's embarrassment on her people's account was quite unnecessary.

  • The old woman, lowering her eyes but casting side glances at the newcomers, had turned her cup upside down and placed a nibbled bit of sugar beside it, and sat quietly in her armchair, though hoping to be offered another cup of tea.

  • Ivanushka, sipping out of her saucer, looked with sly womanish eyes from under her brows at the young men.

  • Pelageya interrupted her companion; she evidently wished to tell what she had seen.

  • All were silent, only the pilgrim woman went on in measured tones, drawing in her breath.

  • "Let me ask her," said Pierre.

  • So he begged: 'Take me to her, take me to her.'

  • So he was brought, quite blind, straight to her, and he goes up to her and falls down and says, 'Make me whole,' says he, 'and I'll give thee what the Tsar bestowed on me.'

  • Pelageya suddenly grew quite pale and clasped her hands.

  • And you who have a son! she began, her pallor suddenly turning to a vivid red.

  • She got up and, almost crying, began to arrange her wallet.

  • Pelageya stopped doubtfully, but in Pierre's face there was such a look of sincere penitence, and Prince Andrew glanced so meekly now at her and now at Pierre, that she was gradually reassured.

  • Pierre listened to her attentively and seriously.

  • Oh, I really did not mean to hurt her feelings.

  • "How do you find Andrew?" she added hurriedly, not giving him time to reply to her affectionate words.

  • "A good figure and in her first bloom," he was saying, but on seeing Rostov, he stopped short and frowned.

  • Ahead of the rest and nearer to him ran a dark- haired, remarkably slim, pretty girl in a yellow chintz dress, with a white handkerchief on her head from under which loose locks of hair escaped.

  • She was evidently leaning right out, for the rustle of her dress and even her breathing could be heard.

  • Do wake up, Sonya! she said almost with tears in her voice.

  • The novelty of Truth endowed her with special strength, but now we need much more powerful methods.

  • It was just then that he received a letter from his wife, who implored him to see her, telling him how grieved she was about him and how she wished to devote her whole life to him.

  • Had his wife come to him, he would not have turned her away.

  • My mother-in-law came to me in tears and said that Helene was here and that she implored me to hear her; that she was innocent and unhappy at my desertion, and much more.

  • I knew that if I once let myself see her I should not have strength to go on refusing what she wanted.

  • But if I forgive her for the sake of doing right, then let union with her have only a spiritual aim.

  • I told my wife that I begged her to forget the past, to forgive me whatever wrong I may have done her, and that I had nothing to forgive.

  • She need not know how hard it was for me to see her again.

  • In this group Helene, as soon as she had settled in Petersburg with her husband, took a very prominent place.

  • Young men read books before attending Helene's evenings, to have something to say in her salon, and secretaries of the embassy, and even ambassadors, confided diplomatic secrets to her, so that in a way Helene was a power.

  • He was that absent-minded crank, a grand seigneur husband who was in no one's way, and far from spoiling the high tone and general impression of the drawing room, he served, by the contrast he presented to her, as an advantageous background to his elegant and tactful wife.

  • Among the many young men who frequented her house every day, Boris Drubetskoy, who had already achieved great success in the service, was the most intimate friend of the Bezukhov household since Helene's return from Erfurt.

  • Her smile for him was the same as for everybody, but sometimes that smile made Pierre uncomfortable.

  • "No, now that she has become a bluestocking she has finally renounced her former infatuations," he told himself.

  • But on the contrary, my papa and mamma are now provided for--I have arranged that rent for them in the Baltic Provinces--and I can live in Petersburg on my pay, and with her fortune and my good management we can get along nicely.

  • And I love her, because her character is sensible and very good.

  • At one time the count thought of giving her the Ryazan estate or of selling a forest, at another time of borrowing money on a note of hand.

  • Natasha was sixteen and it was the year 1809, the very year to which she had counted on her fingers with Boris after they had kissed four years ago.

  • Before Sonya and her mother, if Boris happened to be mentioned, she spoke quite freely of that episode as of some childish, long-forgotten matter that was not worth mentioning.

  • But in the secret depths of her soul the question whether her engagement to Boris was a jest or an important, binding promise tormented her.

  • Anna Mikhaylovna also had of late visited them less frequently, seemed to hold herself with particular dignity, and always spoke rapturously and gratefully of the merits of her son and the brilliant career on which he had entered.

  • But he went with the firm intention of letting her and her parents feel that the childish relations between himself and Natasha could not be binding either on her or on him.

  • When he entered the Rostovs' drawing room Natasha was in her own room.

  • Natasha sat down and, without joining in Boris' conversation with the countess, silently and minutely studied her childhood's suitor.

  • He felt the weight of that resolute and affectionate scrutiny and glanced at her occasionally.

  • All this time Natasha sat silent, glancing up at him from under her brows.

  • He looked round more frequently toward her, and broke off in what he was saying.

  • It seemed to him that he ought to have an explanation with Natasha and tell her that the old times must be forgotten, that in spite of everything... she could not be his wife, that he had no means, and they would never let her marry him.

  • It seemed to her mother and Sonya that Natasha was in love with Boris as of old.

  • The countess--her prayerful mood dispelled--looked round and frowned.

  • She was finishing her last prayer: "Can it be that this couch will be my grave?"

  • Seeing that her mother was still praying she ran on tiptoe to the bed and, rapidly slipping one little foot against the other, pushed off her slippers and jumped onto the bed the countess had feared might become her grave.

  • Natasha jumped on it, sank into the feather bed, rolled over to the wall, and began snuggling up the bedclothes as she settled down, raising her knees to her chin, kicking out and laughing almost inaudibly, now covering herself up head and all, and now peeping at her mother.

  • The countess finished her prayers and came to the bed with a stern face, but seeing, that Natasha's head was covered, she smiled in her kind, weak way.

  • And seizing her mother round the neck, she kissed her on the throat.

  • In her behavior to her mother Natasha seemed rough, but she was so sensitive and tactful that however she clasped her mother she always managed to do it without hurting her or making her feel uncomfortable or displeased.

  • Natasha put her hand on her mother's mouth.

  • No, do tell me! and she removed her hand.

  • As she said this the countess looked round at her daughter.

  • Natasha was lying looking steadily straight before her at one of the mahogany sphinxes carved on the corners of the bedstead, so that the countess only saw her daughter's face in profile.

  • That face struck her by its peculiarly serious and concentrated expression.

  • "Why not?" said Natasha, without changing her position.

  • Natasha did not let her finish.

  • Speak! said she, turning to her mother, who was tenderly gazing at her daughter and in that contemplation seemed to have forgotten all she had wished to say.

  • What nonsense! said Natasha in the tone of one being deprived of her property.

  • Natasha smiled and looked at her mother.

  • Natasha jumped up, snatched up her slippers, and ran barefoot to her own room.

  • "Sonya?" she thought, glancing at that curled-up, sleeping little kitten with her enormous plait of hair.

  • "There is everything, everything in her," continued this man.

  • She is unusually intelligent, charming... and then she is pretty, uncommonly pretty, and agile--she swims and rides splendidly... and her voice!

  • Natasha was going to her first grand ball.

  • Sonya and her mother put themselves entirely in her hands.

  • She was still sitting before a looking-glass with a dressing jacket thrown over her slender shoulders.

  • Sonya stood ready dressed in the middle of the room and, pressing the head of a pin till it hurt her dainty finger, was fixing on a last ribbon that squeaked as the pin went through it.

  • "That's not the way, that's not the way, Sonya!" cried Natasha turning her head and clutching with both hands at her hair which the maid who was dressing it had not time to release.

  • When her hair was done, Natasha, in her short petticoat from under which her dancing shoes showed, and in her mother's dressing jacket, ran up to Sonya, scrutinized her, and then ran to her mother.

  • Turning her mother's head this way and that, she fastened on the cap and, hurriedly kissing her gray hair, ran back to the maids who were turning up the hem of her skirt.

  • A third with pins in her mouth was running about between the countess and Sonya, and a fourth held the whole of the gossamer garment up high on one uplifted hand.

  • Don't come in, Papa! she cried to her father as he opened the door--speaking from under the filmy skirt which still covered her whole face.

  • "If you please, Miss! allow me," said the maid, who on her knees was pulling the skirt straight and shifting the pins from one side of her mouth to the other with her tongue.

  • "Really, madam, it is not at all too long," said Mavra, crawling on her knees after her young lady.

  • At that moment, with soft steps, the countess came in shyly, in her cap and velvet gown.

  • He would have embraced her but, blushing, she stepped aside fearing to be rumpled.

  • "I'll arrange it," and she rushed forward so that the maids who were tacking up her skirt could not move fast enough and a piece of gauze was torn off.

  • In spite of her age and plainness she had gone through the same process as the Rostovs, but with less flurry – for to her it was a matter of routine.

  • She had washed behind her ears just as carefully, and when she entered her drawing room in her yellow dress, wearing her badge as maid of honor, her old lady's maid was as full of rapturous admiration as the Rostovs' servants had been.

  • They praised her taste and toilet, and at eleven o'clock, careful of their coiffures and dresses, they settled themselves in their carriages and drove off.

  • She understood all that awaited her only when, after stepping over the red baize at the entrance, she entered the hall, took off her fur cloak, and, beside Sonya and in front of her mother, mounted the brightly illuminated stairs between the flowers.

  • But, fortunately for her, she felt her eyes growing misty, she saw nothing clearly, her pulse beat a hundred to the minute, and the blood throbbed at her heart.

  • And this was the very attitude that became her best.

  • Natasha looked in the mirrors and could not distinguish her reflection from the others.

  • On entering the ballroom the regular hum of voices, footsteps, and greetings deafened Natasha, and the light and glitter dazzled her still more.

  • The two girls in their white dresses, each with a rose in her black hair, both curtsied in the same way, but the hostess' eye involuntarily rested longer on the slim Natasha.

  • She looked at her and gave her alone a special smile in addition to her usual smile as hostess.

  • Looking at her she may have recalled the golden, irrecoverable days of her own girlhood and her own first ball.

  • Natasha heard and felt that several people were asking about her and looking at her.

  • She realized that those noticing her liked her, and this observation helped to calm her.

  • And look, here come her suitors.

  • Natasha at once recognized the shorter and younger man in the white uniform: it was Bolkonski, who seemed to her to have grown much younger, happier, and better-looking.

  • She stood with her slender arms hanging down, her scarcely defined bosom rising and falling regularly, and with bated breath and glittering, frightened eyes gazed straight before her, evidently prepared for the height of joy or misery.

  • They do not even seem to see me, or if they do they look as if they were saying, 'Ah, she's not the one I'm after, so it's not worth looking at her!'

  • She did not listen to or look at Vera, who was telling her something about her own green dress.

  • An aide-de-camp, the Master of Ceremonies, went up to Countess Bezukhova and asked her to dance.

  • She smilingly raised her hand and laid it on his shoulder without looking at him.

  • Ask her, he said.

  • He recognized her, guessed her feelings, saw that it was her debut, remembered her conversation at the window, and with an expression of pleasure on his face approached Countess Rostova.

  • "I have the pleasure of being already acquainted, if the countess remembers me," said Prince Andrew with a low and courteous bow quite belying Peronskaya's remarks about his rudeness, and approaching Natasha he held out his arm to grasp her waist before he had completed his invitation.

  • He asked her to waltz.

  • Her little feet in their white satin dancing shoes did their work swiftly, lightly, and independently of herself, while her face beamed with ecstatic happiness.

  • Her little feet in their white satin dancing shoes did their work swiftly, lightly, and independently of herself, while her face beamed with ecstatic happiness.

  • For one of the merry cotillions before supper Prince Andrew was again her partner.

  • And such was Natasha, with her surprise, her delight, her shyness, and even her mistakes in speaking French.

  • With her he behaved with special care and tenderness, sitting beside her and talking of the simplest and most unimportant matters; he admired her shy grace.

  • In the middle of the cotillion, having completed one of the figures, Natasha, still out of breath, was returning to her seat when another dancer chose her.

  • When her partner left her Natasha ran across the room to choose two ladies for the figure.

  • "If she goes to her cousin first and then to another lady, she will be my wife," said Prince Andrew to himself quite to his own surprise, as he watched her.

  • She did go first to her cousin.

  • Such as she are rare here, he thought, as Natasha, readjusting a rose that was slipping on her bodice, settled herself beside him.

  • "I have never enjoyed myself so much before!" she said, and Prince Andrew noticed how her thin arms rose quickly as if to embrace her father and instantly dropped again.

  • On her way to supper Natasha passed him.

  • She wished to help him, to bestow on him the superabundance of her own happiness.

  • There's something fresh, original, un- Petersburg-like about her that distinguishes her.

  • After dinner Speranski's daughter and her governess rose.

  • She was wearing a dark-blue house dress in which Prince Andrew thought her even prettier than in her ball dress.

  • As soon as Natasha had finished she went up to him and asked how he liked her voice.

  • He smiled, looking at her, and said he liked her singing as he liked everything she did.

  • Only Countess Helene, considering the society of such people as the Bergs beneath her, could be cruel enough to refuse such an invitation.

  • Berg, closely buttoned up in his new uniform, sat beside his wife explaining to her that one always could and should be acquainted with people above one, because only then does one get satisfaction from acquaintances.

  • (He rose and kissed Vera's hand, and on the way to her straightened out a turned-up corner of the carpet.)

  • Berg rose and embraced his wife carefully, so as not to crush her lace fichu for which he had paid a good price, kissing her straight on the lips.

  • Vera, having decided in her own mind that Pierre ought to be entertained with conversation about the French embassy, at once began accordingly.

  • At the card table he happened to be directly facing Natasha, and was struck by a curious change that had come over her since the ball.

  • She was silent, and not only less pretty than at the ball, but only redeemed from plainness by her look of gentle indifference to everything around.

  • "What's the matter with her?" thought Pierre, glancing at her.

  • She was sitting by her sister at the tea table, and reluctantly, without looking at him, made some reply to Boris who sat down beside her.

  • "What has happened to her?" he asked himself with still greater surprise.

  • Prince Andrew was standing before her, saying something to her with a look of tender solicitude.

  • She, having raised her head, was looking up at him, flushed and evidently trying to master her rapid breathing.

  • Pierre changed places several times during the game, sitting now with his back to Natasha and now facing her, but during the whole of the six rubbers he watched her and his friend.

  • With so intellectual a guest as she considered Prince Andrew to be, she felt that she had to employ her diplomatic tact.

  • Could she be constant in her attachments?

  • Pierre saw how Prince Andrew asked her something and how she flushed as she replied.

  • The countess looked with sad and sternly serious eyes at Prince Andrew when he talked to Natasha and timidly started some artificial conversation about trifles as soon as he looked her way.

  • Prince Andrew surprised her by his timidity.

  • She felt that he wanted to say something to her but could not bring himself to do so.

  • But all the same that night Natasha, now agitated and now frightened, lay a long time in her mother's bed gazing straight before her.

  • She told her how he had complimented her, how he told her he was going abroad, asked her where they were going to spend the summer, and then how he had asked her about Boris.

  • Read them... said her mother, thoughtfully, referring to some verses Prince Andrew had written in Natasha's album.

  • 'Marriages are made in heaven,' said her mother.

  • How happy I am! cried Natasha, shedding tears of joy and excitement and embracing her mother.

  • At that very time Prince Andrew was sitting with Pierre and telling him of his love for Natasha and his firm resolve to make her his wife.

  • That day Countess Helene had a reception at her house.

  • Next day after her talk with her mother Natasha expected Bolkonski all day, but he did not come.

  • Natasha had no desire to go out anywhere and wandered from room to room like a shadow, idle and listless.

  • It seemed to her that everybody knew about her disappointment and was laughing at her and pitying her.

  • Once she came to her mother, tried to say something, and suddenly began to cry.

  • Her tears were those of an offended child who does not know why it is being punished.

  • The countess began to soothe Natasha, who after first listening to her mother's words, suddenly interrupted her:

  • Her voice trembled, and she again nearly cried, but recovered and went on quietly:

  • Having finished her morning tea she went to the ballroom, which she particularly liked for its loud resonance, and began singing her solfeggio.

  • When she had finished her first exercise she stood still in the middle of the room and sang a musical phrase that particularly pleased her.

  • Things are nice as it is, she said to herself, and she began walking up and down the room, not stepping simply on the resounding parquet but treading with each step from the heel to the toe (she had on a new and favorite pair of shoes) and listening to the regular tap of the heel and creak of the toe as gladly as she had to the sounds of her own voice.

  • "There, that's me!" the expression of her face seemed to say as she caught sight of herself.

  • A footman wanted to come in to clear away something in the room but she would not let him, and having closed the door behind him continued her walk.

  • Pretty, a good voice, young, and in nobody's way if only they leave her in peace.

  • But however much they left her in peace she could not now be at peace, and immediately felt this.

  • When she saw herself, her face was pale.

  • "It is long since we had the pleasure..." began the countess, but Prince Andrew interrupted her by answering her intended question, obviously in haste to say what he had to.

  • The countess lowered her eyes, sighing deeply.

  • Again he glanced at her, and that glance convinced her that she was not mistaken.

  • Yes, at once, that very instant, her fate would be decided.

  • Natasha glanced with frightened imploring eyes at Prince Andrew and at her mother and went out.

  • He remained silent, looking into her eyes.

  • I will speak to her when I have your consent....

  • She held out her hand to him, and with a mixed feeling of estrangement and tenderness pressed her lips to his forehead as he stooped to kiss her hand.

  • She wished to love him as a son, but felt that to her he was a stranger and a terrifying man.

  • "I will send her to you," said the countess, and left the room.

  • Sonya said that Natasha was in her bedroom.

  • Seeing her mother she jumped up and flew to her.

  • Prince Andrew came up to her with downcast eyes.

  • He looked at her and was struck by the serious impassioned expression of her face.

  • Her face said: Why ask?

  • He took her hand and kissed it.

  • Then she sighed loudly and, catching her breath more and more quickly, began to sob.

  • Prince Andrew held her hands, looked into her eyes, and did not find in his heart his former love for her.

  • "Did your mother tell you that it cannot be for a year?" asked Prince Andrew, still looking into her eyes.

  • Prince Andrew began to explain to her the reasons for this delay.

  • She looked into her lover's face and saw in it a look of commiseration and perplexity.

  • I'll do anything! she said, suddenly checking her tears.

  • Naturally neither Natasha nor her parents wished to hear of this, but Prince Andrew was firm.

  • He came every day to the Rostovs', but did not behave to Natasha as an affianced lover: he did not use the familiar thou, but said you to her, and kissed only her hand.

  • She did not even cry when, on taking leave, he kissed her hand for the last time.

  • Nor did she cry when he was gone; but for several days she sat in her room dry-eyed, taking no interest in anything and only saying now and then, "Oh, why did he go away?"

  • But a fortnight after his departure, to the surprise of those around her, she recovered from her mental sickness just as suddenly and became her old self again, but with a change in her moral physiognomy, as a child gets up after a long illness with a changed expression of face.

  • Princess Mary had two passions and consequently two joys--her nephew, little Nicholas, and religion--and these were the favorite subjects of the prince's attacks and ridicule.

  • Or, turning to Mademoiselle Bourienne, he would ask her in Princess Mary's presence how she liked our village priests and icons and would joke about them.

  • He continually hurt Princess Mary's feelings and tormented her, but it cost her no effort to forgive him.

  • Could he be to blame toward her, or could her father, whom she knew loved her in spite of it all, be unjust?

  • All the complex laws of man centered for her in one clear and simple law--the law of love and self-sacrifice taught us by Him who lovingly suffered for mankind though He Himself was God.

  • She felt that something had happened to him, but he said nothing to her about his love.

  • Soon after Prince Andrew had gone, Princess Mary wrote to her friend Julie Karagina in Petersburg, whom she had dreamed (as all girls dream) of marrying to her brother, and who was at that time in mourning for her own brother, killed in Turkey.

  • But not to speak of her alone, that early and terrible death has had the most beneficent influence on me and on my brother in spite of all our grief.

  • I do not think my brother will ever marry again, and certainly not her; and this is why: first, I know that though he rarely speaks about the wife he has lost, the grief of that loss has gone too deep in his heart for him ever to decide to give her a successor and our little angel a stepmother.

  • I do not think he would choose her for a wife, and frankly I do not wish it.

  • In the middle of the summer Princess Mary received an unexpected letter from Prince Andrew in Switzerland in which he gave her strange and surprising news.

  • He informed her of his engagement to Natasha Rostova.

  • He asked his sister to forgive him for not having told her of his resolve when he had last visited Bald Hills, though he had spoken of it to his father.

  • After long hesitations, doubts, and prayers, Princess Mary gave the letter to her father.

  • The next day the old prince said to her quietly:

  • The princess was about to reply, but her father would not let her speak and, raising his voice more and more, cried:

  • "Why shouldn't I marry her?" he asked his daughter.

  • And latterly, to her surprise and bewilderment, Princess Mary noticed that her father was really associating more and more with the Frenchwoman.

  • This comforting dream and hope were given her by God's folk-- the half-witted and other pilgrims who visited her without the prince's knowledge.

  • Her father objected to this because he wanted a more distinguished and wealthier match for Andrew.

  • Once, when in a room with a lamp dimly lit before the icon Theodosia was talking of her life, the thought that Theodosia alone had found the true path of life suddenly came to Princess Mary with such force that she resolved to become a pilgrim herself.

  • When Theodosia had gone to sleep Princess Mary thought about this for a long time, and at last made up her mind that, strange as it might seem, she must go on a pilgrimage.

  • She disclosed this thought to no one but to her confessor, Father Akinfi, the monk, and he approved of her intention.

  • Often, listening to the pilgrims' tales, she was so stimulated by their simple speech, mechanical to them but to her so full of deep meaning, that several times she was on the point of abandoning everything and running away from home.

  • But afterwards, when she saw her father and especially little Koko (Nicholas), her resolve weakened.

  • She wept quietly, and felt that she was a sinner who loved her father and little nephew more than God.

  • She told him about her romance with Prince Andrew and of his visit to Otradnoe and showed him his last letter.

  • Her brother often wondered as he looked at her.

  • She did not seem at all like a girl in love and parted from her affianced husband.

  • Once, when he had touched on this topic with his mother, he discovered, to his surprise and somewhat to his satisfaction, that in the depth of her soul she too had doubts about this marriage.

  • "You see he writes," said she, showing her son a letter of Prince Andrew's, with that latent grudge a mother always has in regard to a daughter's future married happiness, "he writes that he won't come before December.

  • And don't attach importance to her being so bright: that's because she's living through the last days of her girlhood, but I know what she is like every time we receive a letter from him!

  • The countess, who heard at once from the maids what had happened at the lodge, was calmed by the thought that now their affairs would certainly improve, but on the other hand felt anxious as to the effect this excitement might have on her son.

  • But once the countess called her son and informed him that she had a promissory note from Anna Mikhaylovna for two thousand rubles, and asked him what he thought of doing with it.

  • Milka, a black-spotted, broad-haunched bitch with prominent black eyes, got up on seeing her master, stretched her hind legs, lay down like a hare, and then suddenly jumped up and licked him right on his nose and mustache.

  • (This meant that the she-wolf, about whom they both knew, had moved with her cubs to the Otradnoe copse, a small place a mile and a half from the house.)

  • But just as Daniel was about to go Natasha came in with rapid steps, not having done up her hair or finished dressing and with her old nurse's big shawl wrapped round her.

  • Natasha, muffled up in shawls which did not hide her eager face and shining eyes, galloped up to them.

  • She was followed by Petya who always kept close to her, by Michael, a huntsman, and by a groom appointed to look after her.

  • Natasha sat easily and confidently on her black Arabchik and reined him in without effort with a firm hand.

  • He knew me, said Natasha, referring to her favorite hound.

  • "In the first place, Trunila is not a 'dog,' but a harrier," thought Nicholas, and looked sternly at his sister, trying to make her feel the distance that ought to separate them at that moment.

  • Mind and don't let her slip!

  • The wolf ran forward and jumped heavily over a gully that lay in her path.

  • Suddenly the wolf's whole physiognomy changed: she shuddered, seeing what she had probably never seen before--human eyes fixed upon her--and turning her head a little toward Rostov, she paused.

  • Nicholas did not hear his own cry nor feel that he was galloping, nor see the borzois, nor the ground over which he went: he saw only the wolf, who, increasing her speed, bounded on in the same direction along the hollow.

  • The first to come into view was Milka, with her black markings and powerful quarters, gaining upon the wolf.

  • Nearer and nearer... now she was ahead of it; but the wolf turned its head to face her, and instead of putting on speed as she usually did Milka suddenly raised her tail and stiffened her forelegs.

  • The wolf crouched, gnashed her teeth, and again rose and bounded forward, followed at the distance of a couple of feet by all the borzois, who did not get any closer to her.

  • A long, yellowish young borzoi, one Nicholas did not know, from another leash, rushed impetuously at the wolf from in front and almost knocked her over.

  • But the wolf jumped up more quickly than anyone could have expected and, gnashing her teeth, flew at the yellowish borzoi, which, with a piercing yelp, fell with its head on the ground, bleeding from a gash in its side.

  • That instant, when Nicholas saw the wolf struggling in the gully with the dogs, while from under them could be seen her gray hair and outstretched hind leg and her frightened choking head, with her ears laid back (Karay was pinning her by the throat), was the happiest moment of his life.

  • With his hand on his saddlebow, he was ready to dismount and stab the wolf, when she suddenly thrust her head up from among that mass of dogs, and then her forepaws were on the edge of the gully.

  • She clicked her teeth (Karay no longer had her by the throat), leaped with a movement of her hind legs out of the gully, and having disengaged herself from the dogs, with tail tucked in again, went forward.

  • The terrified wolf pressed back her ears and tried to rise, but the borzois stuck to her.

  • Daniel rose a little, took a step, and with his whole weight, as if lying down to rest, fell on the wolf, seizing her by the ears.

  • Nicholas was about to stab her, but Daniel whispered, Don't!

  • We'll gag her! and, changing his position, set his foot on the wolf's neck.

  • The huntsmen assembled with their booty and their stories, and all came to look at the wolf, which, with her broad-browed head hanging down and the bitten stick between her jaws, gazed with great glassy eyes at this crowd of dogs and men surrounding her.

  • When she was touched, she jerked her bound legs and looked wildly yet simply at everybody.

  • Natasha, afraid that her brother would do something dreadful, had followed him in some excitement.

  • And considering it polite to return the young count's compliment, Ilagin looked at his borzois and picked out Milka who attracted his attention by her breadth.

  • Natasha saw and felt the agitation the two elderly men and her brother were trying to conceal, and was herself excited by it.

  • At the very moment when she would have seized her prey, the hare moved and darted along the balk between the winter rye and the stubble.

  • There she sits and her skirt dangles....

  • "Uncle" lifted Natasha off her horse and taking her hand led her up the rickety wooden steps of the porch.

  • She went to the table, set down the tray, and with her plump white hands deftly took from it the bottles and various hors d'oeuvres and dishes and arranged them on the table.

  • When she had finished, she stepped aside and stopped at the door with a smile on her face.

  • Now do you understand 'Uncle'? her expression said to Rostov.

  • Natasha felt so lighthearted and happy in these novel surroundings that she only feared the trap would come for her too soon.

  • Just as "Uncle's" pickled mushrooms, honey, and cherry brandy had seemed to her the best in the world, so also that song, at that moment, seemed to her the acme of musical delight.

  • Anisya Fedorovna came in and leaned her portly person against the doorpost.

  • Anisya Fedorovna, with her light step, willingly went to fulfill her errand and brought back the guitar.

  • Anisya Fedorovna flushed, and drawing her kerchief over her face went laughing out of the room.

  • "Nicholas, Nicholas!" she said, turning to her brother, as if asking him: "What is it moves me so?"

  • "Go on, Uncle dear," Natasha wailed in an imploring tone as if her life depended on it.

  • Natasha threw off the shawl from her shoulders, ran forward to face "Uncle," and setting her arms akimbo also made a motion with her shoulders and struck an attitude.

  • Where is he now? she thought, and her face suddenly became serious.

  • "Uncle" wrapped Natasha up warmly and took leave of her with quite a new tenderness.

  • I feel so comfortable! answered Natasha, almost perplexed by her feelings.

  • And Nicholas heard her spontaneous, happy, ringing laughter.

  • I have no other friend like her and never shall have.

  • From her feminine point of view she could see only one solution, namely, for Nicholas to marry a rich heiress.

  • Karagina had replied that for her part she was agreeable, and everything depend on her daughter's inclination.

  • Several times the countess, with tears in her eyes, told her son that now both her daughters were settled, her only wish was to see him married.

  • She said she could lie down in her grave peacefully if that were accomplished.

  • Nicholas guessed what his mother's remarks were leading to and during one of these conversations induced her to speak quite frankly.

  • She told him that her only hope of getting their affairs disentangled now lay in his marrying Julie Karagina.

  • "No, you have not understood me, don't let us talk about it," she replied, wiping away her tears.

  • Because Sonya is poor I must not love her," he thought, "must not respond to her faithful, devoted love?

  • She saw with sorrow, and sometimes with exasperation, symptoms of a growing attachment between her son and the portionless Sonya.

  • Though she blamed herself for it, she could not refrain from grumbling at and worrying Sonya, often pulling her up without reason, addressing her stiffly as "my dear," and using the formal "you" instead of the intimate "thou" in speaking to her.

  • Natasha was still as much in love with her betrothed, found the same comfort in that love, and was still as ready to throw herself into all the pleasures of life as before; but at the end of the fourth month of their separation she began to have fits of depression which she could not master.

  • Natasha came into the room, went up to Sonya, glanced at what she was doing, and then went up to her mother and stood without speaking.

  • "Why are you wandering about like an outcast?" asked her mother.

  • The countess lifted her head and looked attentively at her daughter.

  • Her voice broke, tears gushed from her eyes, and she turned quickly to hide them and left the room.

  • Her voice broke, tears gushed from her eyes, and she turned quickly to hide them and left the room.

  • "Let her alone, Kondratevna," said Natasha.

  • On her way past the butler's pantry she told them to set a samovar, though it was not at all the time for tea.

  • Natasha liked to test her power over him.

  • She seemed to be trying whether any of them would get angry or sulky with her; but the serfs fulfilled no one's orders so readily as they did hers.

  • "Nastasya Ivanovna, what sort of children shall I have?" she asked the buffoon, who was coming toward her in a woman's jacket.

  • And tapping with her heels, she ran quickly upstairs to see Vogel and his wife who lived on the upper story.

  • "The island of Madagascar," she said, "Ma-da-gas-car," she repeated, articulating each syllable distinctly, and, not replying to Madame Schoss who asked her what she was saying, she went out of the room.

  • Her brother Petya was upstairs too; with the man in attendance on him he was preparing fireworks to let off that night.

  • Petya ran up and offered her his back.

  • She jumped on it, putting her arms round his neck, and he pranced along with her.

  • What she drew from the guitar would have had no meaning for other listeners, but in her imagination a whole series of reminiscences arose from those sounds.

  • She sat behind the bookcase with her eyes fixed on a streak of light escaping from the pantry door and listened to herself and pondered.

  • Sonya passed to the pantry with a glass in her hand.

  • Natasha glanced at her and at the crack in the pantry door, and it seemed to her that she remembered the light falling through that crack once before and Sonya passing with a glass in her hand.

  • She sat awhile, wondering what the meaning of it all having happened before could be, and without solving this problem, or at all regretting not having done so, she again passed in fancy to the time when she was with him and he was looking at her with a lover's eyes.

  • But Natasha stayed by her mother and glanced round as if looking for something.

  • "Mamma!" she muttered, "give him to me, give him, Mamma, quickly, quickly!" and she again had difficulty in repressing her sobs.

  • The same faces, the same talk, Papa holding his cup and blowing in the same way! thought Natasha, feeling with horror a sense of repulsion rising up in her for the whole household, because they were always the same.

  • While they were talking a maid thrust her head in at the other door of the sitting room.

  • Dimmler began to play; Natasha went on tiptoe noiselessly to the table, took up a candle, carried it out, and returned, seating herself quietly in her former place.

  • Standing as usual in the middle of the hall and choosing the place where the resonance was best, Natasha began to sing her mother's favorite song.

  • Sonya, as she listened, thought of the immense difference there was between herself and her friend, and how impossible it was for her to be anything like as bewitching as her cousin.

  • She thought of Natasha and of her own youth, and of how there was something unnatural and dreadful in this impending marriage of Natasha and Prince Andrew.

  • Her maternal instinct told her that Natasha had too much of something, and that because of this she would not be happy.

  • Her maternal instinct told her that Natasha had too much of something, and that because of this she would not be happy.

  • "Idiot!" she screamed at her brother and, running to a chair, threw herself on it, sobbing so violently that she could not stop for a long time.

  • Melyukova was a widow, who, with her family and their tutors and governesses, lived three miles from the Rostovs.

  • I'll make Pashette open her eyes.

  • Her mustache and eyebrows were extraordinarily becoming.

  • Everyone told her she looked very handsome, and she was in a spirited and energetic mood unusual with her.

  • Nicholas glanced round at Sonya, and bent down to see her face closer.

  • "That used to be Sonya," thought he, and looked at her closer and smiled.

  • Pelageya Danilovna Melyukova, a broadly built, energetic woman wearing spectacles, sat in the drawing room in a loose dress, surrounded by her daughters whom she was trying to keep from feeling dull.

  • "And who is this?" she asked her governess, peering into the face of her own daughter dressed up as a Kazan-Tartar.

  • Sometimes, as she looked at the strange but amusing capers cut by the dancers, who--having decided once for all that being disguised, no one would recognize them--were not at all shy, Pelageya Danilovna hid her face in her handkerchief, and her whole stout body shook with irrepressible, kindly, elderly laughter.

  • Pelageya Danilovna began to recognize the mummers, admired their cleverly contrived costumes, and particularly how they suited the young ladies, and she thanked them all for having entertained her so well.

  • "Ah! ah!" screamed Natasha, rolling her eyes with horror.

  • Then he caught her up.

  • Whether they were playing the ring and string game or the ruble game or talking as now, Nicholas did not leave Sonya's side, and gazed at her with quite new eyes.

  • And really, that evening, Sonya was brighter, more animated, and prettier than Nicholas had ever seen her before.

  • They told her where the barn was and how she should stand and listen, and they handed her a fur cloak.

  • She threw this over her head and shoulders and glanced at Nicholas.

  • Sonya came along, wrapped in her cloak.

  • She was only a couple of paces away when she saw him, and to her too he was not the Nicholas she had known and always slightly feared.

  • He slipped his arms under the cloak that covered her head, embraced her, pressed her to him, and kissed her on the lips that wore a mustache and had a smell of burnt cork.

  • Sonya kissed him full on the lips, and disengaging her little hands pressed them to his cheeks.

  • He looked and recognizing in her both the old and the new Sonya, and being reminded by the smell of burnt cork of the sensation of her kiss, inhaled the frosty air with a full breast and, looking at the ground flying beneath him and at the sparkling sky, felt himself again in fairyland.

  • "Have you told her?" asked Natasha, suddenly beaming all over with joy.

  • "I see someone with a mustache," said Natasha, seeing her own face.

  • With Sonya's help and the maid's, Natasha got the glass she held into the right position opposite the other; her face assumed a serious expression and she sat silent.

  • "Of course she will!" whispered Natasha, but did not finish... suddenly Sonya pushed away the glass she was holding and covered her eyes with her hand.

  • "You saw him?" urged Natasha, seizing her hand.

  • Is he ill? asked Natasha, her frightened eyes fixed on her friend.

  • Natasha began, and without replying to Sonya's words of comfort she got into bed, and long after her candle was out lay open-eyed and motionless, gazing at the moonlight through the frosty windowpanes.

  • Nicholas, for the first time, felt that his mother was displeased with him and that, despite her love for him, she would not give way.

  • Coldly, without looking at her son, she sent for her husband and, when he came, tried briefly and coldly to inform him of the facts, in her son's presence, but unable to restrain herself she burst into tears of vexation and left the room.

  • The father and mother did not speak of the matter to their son again, but a few days later the countess sent for Sonya and, with a cruelty neither of them expected, reproached her niece for trying to catch Nicholas and for ingratitude.

  • She was ready to sacrifice everything for her benefactors.

  • Self- sacrifice was her most cherished idea but in this case she could not see what she ought to sacrifice, or for whom.

  • He first implored her to forgive him and Sonya and consent to their marriage, then he threatened that if she molested Sonya he would at once marry her secretly.

  • The countess, with a coldness her son had never seen in her before, replied that he was of age, that Prince Andrew was marrying without his father's consent, and he could do the same, but that she would never receive that intriguer as her daughter.

  • Exploding at the word intriguer, Nicholas, raising his voice, told his mother he had never expected her to try to force him to sell his feelings, but if that were so, he would say for the last time....

  • The countess, sobbing heavily, hid her face on her daughter's breast, while Nicholas rose, clutching his head, and left the room.

  • Natasha, who had borne the first period of separation from her betrothed lightly and even cheerfully, now grew more agitated and impatient every day.

  • The thought that her best days, which she would have employed in loving him, were being vainly wasted, with no advantage to anyone, tormented her incessantly.

  • It hurt her to think that while she lived only in the thought of him, he was living a real life, seeing new places and new people that interested him.

  • Her letters to him, far from giving her any comfort, seemed to her a wearisome and artificial obligation.

  • Her letters to him, far from giving her any comfort, seemed to her a wearisome and artificial obligation.

  • She wrote to him formal, monotonous, and dry letters, to which she attached no importance herself, and in the rough copies of which the countess corrected her mistakes in spelling.

  • Pierre felt that she was right, and to avoid compromising her went away to Moscow.

  • "Helene, who has never cared for anything but her own body and is one of the stupidest women in the world," thought Pierre, "is regarded by people as the acme of intelligence and refinement, and they pay homage to her.

  • She did not go out into society; everyone knew that her father would not let her go anywhere without him, and his failing health prevented his going out himself, so that she was not invited to dinners and evening parties.

  • Julie, with whom she had corresponded for the last five years, was in Moscow, but proved to be quite alien to her when they met.

  • She was surrounded by young men who, she fancied, had suddenly learned to appreciate her worth.

  • In Moscow Princess Mary had no one to talk to, no one to whom to confide her sorrow, and much sorrow fell to her lot just then.

  • Another lately added sorrow arose from the lessons she gave her six year-old nephew.

  • To her consternation she detected in herself in relation to little Nicholas some symptoms of her father's irritability.

  • But what distressed the princess most of all was her father's irritability, which was always directed against her and had of late amounted to cruelty.

  • A few minutes later Mademoiselle Bourienne came into Princess Mary's room smiling and making cheerful remarks in her agreeable voice.

  • "And if you allow yourself," he screamed in a fury, addressing Princess Mary for the first time, "to forget yourself again before her as you dared to do yesterday, I will show you who is master in this house.

  • Don't let me set eyes on you; beg her pardon!

  • Princess Mary asked Mademoiselle Bourienne's pardon, and also her father's pardon for herself and for Philip the footman, who had begged for her intervention.

  • At such moments something like a pride of sacrifice gathered in her soul.

  • At first she heard only Metivier's voice, then her father's, then both voices began speaking at the same time, the door was flung open, and on the threshold appeared the handsome figure of the terrified Metivier with his shock of black hair, and the prince in his dressing gown and fez, his face distorted with fury and the pupils of his eyes rolled downwards.

  • Had he not told her, yes, told her to make a list, and not to admit anyone who was not on that list?

  • With her, he said, he could not have a moment's peace and could not die quietly.

  • But he could not restrain himself and with the virulence of which only one who loves is capable, evidently suffering himself, he shook his fists at her and screamed:

  • The guests were reluctant to address her, feeling that she was in no mood for their conversation.

  • He gave her a cold, angry look and offered her his wrinkled, clean- shaven cheek to kiss.

  • The whole expression of his face told her that he had not forgotten the morning's talk, that his decision remained in force, and only the presence of visitors hindered his speaking of it to her now.

  • Princess Mary as she sat listening to the old men's talk and faultfinding, understood nothing of what she heard; she only wondered whether the guests had all observed her father's hostile attitude toward her.

  • She did not even notice the special attentions and amiabilities shown her during dinner by Boris Drubetskoy, who was visiting them for the third time already.

  • "You noticed nothing?" her look asked.

  • Why do you ask me that? said Princess Mary, still thinking of that morning's conversation with her father.

  • "Really?" asked Princess Mary, looking into Pierre's kindly face and still thinking of her own sorrow.

  • "Oh, my God, Count, there are moments when I would marry anybody!" she cried suddenly to her own surprise and with tears in her voice.

  • Princess Mary shook her head side to side.

  • I really don't know what sort of girl she is; I can't analyze her at all.

  • She is enchanting, but what makes her so I don't know.

  • Princess Mary sighed, and the expression on her face said: "Yes, that's what I expected and feared."

  • Princess Mary again shook her head disapprovingly.

  • Tell her so if you see her before I do.

  • Princess Mary told Pierre of her plan to become intimate with her future sister-in-law as soon as the Rostovs arrived and to try to accustom the old prince to her.

  • After the death of her brothers she had become very wealthy.

  • Her dresses were always of the latest fashion.

  • Though nothing of the kind had happened to her she was regarded in that light, and had even herself come to believe that she had suffered much in life.

  • Boris read 'Poor Liza' aloud to her, and more than once interrupted the reading because of the emotions that choked him.

  • Anna Mikhaylovna regarded the refined sadness that united her son to the wealthy Julie with emotion, and resignation to the Divine will.

  • "Ah, my dear, I can't tell you how fond I have grown of Julie latterly," she said to her son.

  • "And how I pity her mother," she went on; "today she showed me her accounts and letters from Penza (they have enormous estates there), and she, poor thing, has no one to help her, and they do cheat her so!"

  • He laughed blandly at her naive diplomacy but listened to what she had to say, and sometimes questioned her carefully about the Penza and Nizhegorod estates.

  • "My dear," said Anna Mikhaylovna to her son, "I know from a reliable source that Prince Vasili has sent his son to Moscow to get him married to Julie.

  • Boris began, wishing to sting her; but at that instant the galling thought occurred to him that he might have to leave Moscow without having accomplished his aim, and have vainly wasted his efforts--which was a thing he never allowed to happen.

  • He checked himself in the middle of the sentence, lowered his eyes to avoid seeing her unpleasantly irritated and irresolute face, and said:

  • He glanced at her to make sure that he might go on.

  • Her irritability had suddenly quite vanished, and her anxious, imploring eyes were fixed on him with greedy expectation.

  • Her irritability had suddenly quite vanished, and her anxious, imploring eyes were fixed on him with greedy expectation.

  • "I can always arrange so as not to see her often," thought Boris.

  • There was no need to say more: Julie's face shone with triumph and self- satisfaction; but she forced Boris to say all that is said on such occasions--that he loved her and had never loved any other woman more than her.

  • The countess was still unwell and unable to travel but it was impossible to wait for her recovery.

  • She had already married off her daughter, and her sons were all in the service.

  • She held herself as erect, told everyone her opinion as candidly, loudly, and bluntly as ever, and her whole bearing seemed a reproach to others for any weakness, passion, or temptation--the possibility of which she did not admit.

  • From early in the morning, wearing a dressing jacket, she attended to her household affairs, and then she drove out: on holy days to church and after the service to jails and prisons on affairs of which she never spoke to anyone.

  • Marya Dmitrievna, with her spectacles hanging down on her nose and her head flung back, stood in the hall doorway looking with a stern, grim face at the new arrivals.

  • You've grown plumper and prettier, she remarked, drawing Natasha (whose cheeks were glowing from the cold) to her by the hood.

  • Now take off your things, quick! she shouted to the count who was going to kiss her hand.

  • But we'll speak of that later on, she added, glancing at Sonya with a look that showed she did not want to speak of it in her presence.

  • Shinshin? she crooked one of her fingers.

  • She's here with her son.

  • He ran away from her and she came galloping after him.

  • One thing has come on top of another: her rags to buy, and now a purchaser has turned up for the Moscow estate and for the house.

  • Next morning Marya Dmitrievna took the young ladies to the Iberian shrine of the Mother of God and to Madame Suppert-Roguet, who was so afraid of Marya Dmitrievna that she always let her have costumes at a loss merely to get rid of her.

  • When they got home she turned everybody out of the room except Natasha, and then called her pet to her armchair.

  • She held her hand a couple of feet from the ground.

  • Natasha remained silent, from shyness Marya Dmitrievna supposed, but really because she disliked anyone interfering in what touched her love of Prince Andrew, which seemed to her so apart from all human affairs that no one could understand it.

  • She loved and knew Prince Andrew, he loved her only, and was to come one of these days and take her.

  • Natasha, on the other hand, having put on her best gown, was in the highest spirits.

  • She thought her too fashionably dressed, frivolously gay and vain.

  • He did not mention this to his daughter, but Natasha noticed her father's nervousness and anxiety and felt mortified by it.

  • Natasha felt offended by the hesitation she had noticed in the anteroom, by her father's nervousness, and by the unnatural manner of the princess who--she thought--was making a favor of receiving her, and so everything displeased her.

  • God is my witness, I didn't know-" he repeated, stressing the word "God" so unnaturally and so unpleasantly that Princess Mary stood with downcast eyes not daring to look either at her father or at Natasha.

  • When the count returned, Natasha was impolitely pleased and hastened to get away: at that moment she hated the stiff, elderly princess, who could place her in such an embarrassing position and had spent half an hour with her without once mentioning Prince Andrew.

  • When the count was already leaving the room, Princess Mary went up hurriedly to Natasha, took her by the hand, and said with a deep sigh:

  • Natasha glanced at her ironically without knowing why.

  • She sat in her room crying like a child, blowing her nose and sobbing.

  • Sonya stood beside her, kissing her hair.

  • Natasha raised her head and, kissing her friend on the lips, pressed her wet face against her.

  • "And how can Sonya love Nicholas so calmly and quietly and wait so long and so patiently?" thought she, looking at Sonya, who also came in quite ready, with a fan in her hand.

  • Natasha, smoothing her gown, went in with Sonya and sat down, scanning the brilliant tiers of boxes opposite.

  • Natasha's looks, as everyone told her, had improved in the country, and that evening thanks to her agitation she was particularly pretty.

  • She struck those who saw her by her fullness of life and beauty, combined with her indifference to everything about her.

  • "Look, there's Alenina," said Sonya, "with her mother, isn't it?"

  • And he no doubt is calming her jealousy of me.

  • Behind them sat Anna Mikhaylovna wearing a green headdress and with a happy look of resignation to the will of God on her face.

  • The count, laughing, nudged the blushing Sonya and pointed to her former adorer.

  • A tall, beautiful woman with a mass of plaited hair and much exposed plump white shoulders and neck, round which she wore a double string of large pearls, entered the adjoining box rustling her heavy silk dress and took a long time settling into her place.

  • While Natasha was fixing her gaze on her for the second time the lady looked round and, meeting the count's eyes, nodded to him and smiled.

  • After her life in the country, and in her present serious mood, all this seemed grotesque and amazing to Natasha.

  • As she looked and thought, the strangest fancies unexpectedly and disconnectedly passed through her mind: the idea occurred to her of jumping onto the edge of the box and singing the air the actress was singing, then she wished to touch with her fan an old gentleman sitting not far from her, then to lean over to Helene and tickle her.

  • Having looked at Natasha he approached his sister, laid his well gloved hand on the edge of her box, nodded to her, and leaning forward asked a question, with a motion toward Natasha.

  • Natasha knew he was talking about her and this afforded her pleasure.

  • She even turned so that he should see her profile in what she thought was its most becoming aspect.

  • When he got there he leaned on his elbows and, smiling, talked to her for a long time.

  • While conversing with Pierre, Natasha heard a man's voice in Countess Bezukhova's box and something told her it was Kuragin.

  • Almost smiling, he gazed straight into her eyes with such an enraptured caressing look that it seemed strange to be so near him, to look at him like that, to be so sure he admired her, and not to be acquainted with him.

  • They did not drag her away at once, but sang with her for a long time and then at last dragged her off, and behind the scenes something metallic was struck three times and everyone knelt down and sang a prayer.

  • When the second act was over Countess Bezukhova rose, turned to the Rostovs' box--her whole bosom completely exposed--beckoned the old count with a gloved finger, and paying no attention to those who had entered her box began talking to him with an amiable smile.

  • Countess Bezukhova quite deserved her reputation of being a fascinating woman.

  • I have already heard much of you in Petersburg and wanted to get to know you, said she to Natasha with her stereotyped and lovely smile.

  • To get better acquainted she asked that one of the young ladies should come into her box for the rest of the performance, and Natasha moved over to it.

  • "Let me introduce my brother to you," said Helene, her eyes shifting uneasily from Natasha to Anatole.

  • Natasha turned her pretty little head toward the elegant young officer and smiled at him over her bare shoulder.

  • Kuragin asked her opinion of the performance and told her how at a previous performance Semenova had fallen down on the stage.

  • "And do you know, Countess," he said, suddenly addressing her as an old, familiar acquaintance, "we are getting up a costume tournament; you ought to take part in it!

  • While saying this he never removed his smiling eyes from her face, her neck, and her bare arms.

  • When she was not looking at him she felt that he was looking at her shoulders, and she involuntarily caught his eye so that he should look into hers rather than this.

  • Natasha kept turning to Helene and to her father, as if asking what it all meant, but Helene was engaged in conversation with a general and did not answer her look, and her father's eyes said nothing but what they always said: Having a good time?

  • During one of these moments of awkward silence when Anatole's prominent eyes were gazing calmly and fixedly at her, Natasha, to break the silence, asked him how he liked Moscow.

  • But now I like it very much indeed, he said, looking at her significantly.

  • Do come!" and putting out his hand to her bouquet and dropping his voice, he added, "You will be the prettiest there.

  • Natasha went back to her father in the other box, now quite submissive to the world she found herself in.

  • All that was going on before her now seemed quite natural, but on the other hand all her previous thoughts of her betrothed, of Princess Mary, or of life in the country did not once recur to her mind and were as if belonging to a remote past.

  • As he was putting Natasha in he pressed her arm above the elbow.

  • He was looking at her with glittering eyes, smiling tenderly.

  • Only after she had reached home was Natasha able clearly to think over what had happened to her, and suddenly remembering Prince Andrew she was horrified, and at tea to which all had sat down after the opera, she gave a loud exclamation, flushed, and ran out of the room.

  • So Natasha tried to solve what was torturing her by herself.

  • All will be forgiven her, for she loved much; and all will be forgiven him, for he enjoyed much.

  • At supper after the opera he described to Dolokhov with the air of a connoisseur the attractions of her arms, shoulders, feet, and hair and expressed his intention of making love to her.

  • "I will tell my sister to ask her to dinner," said Anatole.

  • She suffered more now than during her first days in Moscow.

  • To her impatience and pining for him were now added the unpleasant recollection of her interview with Princess Mary and the old prince, and a fear and anxiety of which she did not understand the cause.

  • She continually fancied that either he would never come or that something would happen to her before he came.

  • As soon as she began to think of him, the recollection of the old prince, of Princess Mary, of the theater, and of Kuragin mingled with her thoughts.

  • On Sunday morning Marya Dmitrievna invited her visitors to Mass at her parish church--the Church of the Assumption built over the graves of victims of the plague.

  • "I don't like those fashionable churches," she said, evidently priding herself on her independence of thought.

  • Her whole house was scrubbed and cleaned on Saturdays; neither she nor the servants worked, and they all wore holiday dress and went to church.

  • At her table there were extra dishes at dinner, and the servants had vodka and roast goose or suckling pig.

  • No, this is really beyond anything, my dear count, said she to Count Rostov who had followed her in.

  • She looked at Natasha's dresses and praised them, as well as a new dress of her own made of "metallic gauze," which she had received from Paris, and advised Natasha to have one like it.

  • Helene for her part was sincerely delighted with Natasha and wished to give her a good time.

  • Anatole had asked her to bring him and Natasha together, and she was calling on the Rostovs for that purpose.

  • The idea of throwing her brother and Natasha together amused her.

  • As she was leaving the Rostovs she called her protegee aside.

  • So she knows I am engaged, and she and her husband Pierre--that good Pierre--have talked and laughed about this.

  • Helene welcomed Natasha delightedly and was loud in admiration of her beauty and her dress.

  • Soon after their arrival Mademoiselle George went out of the room to change her costume.

  • Anatole moved a chair for Natasha and was about to sit down beside her, but the count, who never lost sight of her, took the seat himself.

  • In some places she raised her voice, in others she whispered, lifting her head triumphantly; sometimes she paused and uttered hoarse sounds, rolling her eyes.

  • She only felt herself again completely borne away into this strange senseless world--so remote from her old world--a world in which it was impossible to know what was good or bad, reasonable or senseless.

  • Natasha remarked to her father who had also risen and was moving through the crowd toward the actress.

  • Natasha without saying anything stepped up to her father and looked at him with surprised inquiring eyes.

  • After giving several recitations, Mademoiselle George left, and Countess Bezukhova asked her visitors into the ballroom.

  • The count wished to go home, but Helene entreated him not to spoil her improvised ball, and the Rostovs stayed on.

  • Anatole asked Natasha for a valse and as they danced he pressed her waist and hand and told her she was bewitching and that he loved her.

  • She lowered her eyes.

  • Natasha, animated and excited, looked about her with wide-open frightened eyes and seemed merrier than usual.

  • Her father asked her to come home, but she begged to remain.

  • Her father asked her to come home, but she begged to remain.

  • Later on she recalled how she had asked her father to let her go to the dressing room to rearrange her dress, that Helene had followed her and spoken laughingly of her brother's love, and that she again met Anatole in the little sitting room.

  • Can I never...? and, blocking her path, he brought his face close to hers.

  • "Natalie?" he whispered inquiringly while she felt her hands being painfully pressed.

  • I have nothing to say, her eyes replied.

  • Burning lips were pressed to hers, and at the same instant she felt herself released, and Helene's footsteps and the rustle of her dress were heard in the room.

  • Natasha looked round at her, and then, red and trembling, threw a frightened look of inquiry at Anatole and moved toward the door.

  • She so wanted a word from him that would explain to her what had happened and to which she could find no answer.

  • Natasha kept looking uneasily at everybody with wide-open eyes, as if wishing to intercept every glance directed toward her, and tried to appear the same as usual.

  • After breakfast, which was her best time, Marya Dmitrievna sat down in her armchair and called Natasha and the count to her.

  • And I am sorry I went to see him and took her, said the old count.

  • But if he won't--that's his affair, said Marya Dmitrievna, looking for something in her reticule.

  • Natasha did not reply and went to her own room to read Princess Mary's letter.

  • Whatever her father's feelings might be, she begged Natasha to believe that she could not help loving her as the one chosen by her brother, for whose happiness she was ready to sacrifice everything.

  • He is an invalid and an old man who must be forgiven; but he is good and magnanimous and will love her who makes his son happy.

  • Princess Mary went on to ask Natasha to fix a time when she could see her again.

  • After dinner Natasha went to her room and again took up Princess Mary's letter.

  • She recalled her love for Prince Andrew in all its former strength, and at the same time felt that she loved Kuragin.

  • She vividly pictured herself as Prince Andrew's wife, and the scenes of happiness with him she had so often repeated in her imagination, and at the same time, aglow with excitement, recalled every detail of yesterday's interview with Anatole.

  • And how could she have a love letter from him in her hand?

  • Then he went on to say that he knew her parents would not give her to him--for this there were secret reasons he could reveal only to her--but that if she loved him she need only say the word yes, and no human power could hinder their bliss.

  • He would steal her away and carry her off to the ends of the earth.

  • On returning late in the evening Sonya went to Natasha's room, and to her surprise found her still dressed and asleep on the sofa.

  • Open on the table, beside her lay Anatole's letter.

  • As she read she glanced at the sleeping Natasha, trying to find in her face an explanation of what she was reading, but did not find it.

  • Her face was calm, gentle, and happy.

  • Clutching her breast to keep herself from choking, Sonya, pale and trembling with fear and agitation, sat down in an armchair and burst into tears.

  • So this is the meaning of her excited, resolute, unnatural look the day before yesterday, yesterday, and today, thought Sonya.

  • Sonya wiped away her tears and went up to Natasha, again scanning her face.

  • And with the decision and tenderness that often come at the moment of awakening, she embraced her friend, but noticing Sonya's look of embarrassment, her own face expressed confusion and suspicion.

  • Sonya stared open-eyed at Natasha, unable to believe her ears.

  • When she saw Natasha's fright, Sonya shed tears of shame and pity for her friend.

  • Natasha did not answer her questions.

  • Evidently this question presented itself to her mind for the first time and she did not know how to answer it.

  • Sonya sighed and shook her head incredulously.

  • But Natasha, guessing her doubts, interrupted her in alarm.

  • Natasha repeated with a smile of pity at her friend's lack of comprehension.

  • Hard as it was for Sonya, she watched her friend and did not let her out of her sight.

  • Sonya began watching her friend still more attentively and noticed that at dinner and all that evening Natasha was in a strange and unnatural state.

  • After tea Sonya noticed a housemaid at Natasha's door timidly waiting to let her pass.

  • Sonya knocked at her door.

  • Natasha did not let her in.

  • There was something particularly pathetic and resolute in her face today.

  • If I don't sleep for three nights I'll not leave this passage and will hold her back by force and will and not let the family be disgraced, thought she.

  • Well, you'll carry her off--all right!

  • Go to Matrena Matrevna and ask her for the sable cloak.

  • Why, she'll rush out more dead than alive just in the things she is wearing; if you delay at all there'll be tears and 'Papa' and 'Mamma,' and she's frozen in a minute and must go back--but you wrap the fur cloak round her first thing and carry her to the sleigh.

  • Dolokhov, without answering, took the cloak, threw it over Matrena, and wrapped her up in it.

  • "That's the way," said Dolokhov, "and then so!" and he turned the collar up round her head, leaving only a little of the face uncovered.

  • "Well, Prince, may God give you great luck!" said Matrena in her gypsy accent.

  • Marya Dmitrievna, having found Sonya weeping in the corridor, made her confess everything, and intercepting the note to Natasha she read it and went into Natasha's room with it in her hand.

  • When Gabriel came to inform her that the men who had come had run away again, she rose frowning, and clasping her hands behind her paced through the rooms a long time considering what she should do.

  • Toward midnight she went to Natasha's room fingering the key in her pocket.

  • "Marya Dmitrievna, for God's sake let me in to her!" she pleaded, but Marya Dmitrievna unlocked the door and went in without giving her an answer....

  • I'm only sorry for her father! thought she, trying to restrain her wrath.

  • Natasha lying on the sofa, her head hidden in her hands, and she did not stir.

  • And Marya Dmitrievna touched her arm.

  • Natasha did not change her position, but her whole body heaved with noiseless, convulsive sobs which choked her.

  • "It's lucky for him that he escaped me; but I'll find him!" she said in her rough voice.

  • She put her large hand under Natasha's face and turned it toward her.

  • Her eyes were dry and glistening, her lips compressed, her cheeks sunken.

  • Her eyes were dry and glistening, her lips compressed, her cheeks sunken.

  • I shall die! she muttered, wrenching herself from Marya Dmitrievna's hands with a vicious effort and sinking down again into her former position.

  • Marya Dmitrievna went on admonishing her for some time, enjoining on her that it must all be kept from her father and assuring her that nobody would know anything about it if only Natasha herself would undertake to forget it all and not let anyone see that something had happened.

  • "Well, let her sleep," said Marya Dmitrievna as she went out of the room supposing Natasha to be asleep.

  • All that night she did not sleep or weep and did not speak to Sonya who got up and went to her several times.

  • Natasha had not left her room that morning.

  • When the count came to see her she turned anxiously round at the sound of a man's footstep, and then her face resumed its cold and malevolent expression.

  • In reply to the count's anxious inquiries as to why she was so dejected and whether anything had happened to her betrothed, she assured him that nothing had happened and asked him not to worry.

  • From the pretense of illness, from his daughter's distress, and by the embarrassed faces of Sonya and Marya Dmitrievna, the count saw clearly that something had gone wrong during his absence, but it was so terrible for him to think that anything disgraceful had happened to his beloved daughter, and he so prized his own cheerful tranquillity, that he avoided inquiries and tried to assure himself that nothing particularly had happened; and he was only dissatisfied that her indisposition delayed their return to the country.

  • He went to Tver to see Joseph Alexeevich's widow, who had long since promised to hand over to him some papers of her deceased husband's.

  • When he returned to Moscow Pierre was handed a letter from Marya Dmitrievna asking him to come and see her on a matter of great importance relating to Andrew Bolkonski and his betrothed.

  • "If only Prince Andrew would hurry up and come and marry her!" thought he on his way to the house.

  • In Marya Dmitrievna's anteroom the footman who helped him off with his fur coat said that the mistress asked him to come to her bedroom.

  • He could not reconcile the charming impression he had of Natasha, whom he had known from a child, with this new conception of her baseness, folly, and cruelty.

  • He did not know that Natasha's soul was overflowing with despair, shame, and humiliation, and that it was not her fault that her face happened to assume an expression of calm dignity and severity.

  • After hearing the details of Anatole's marriage from Pierre, and giving vent to her anger against Anatole in words of abuse, Marya Dmitrievna told Pierre why she had sent for him.

  • Having briefly and exactly explained her wishes to him, she let him go to the drawing room.

  • And I will go and tell her it is no use expecting him!

  • Have you heard she has broken off her engagement without consulting anybody?

  • Natasha is not quite well; she's in her room and would like to see you.

  • Marya Dmitrievna is with her and she too asks you to come.

  • Natasha, pale and stern, was sitting beside Marya Dmitrievna, and her eyes, glittering feverishly, met Pierre with a questioning look the moment he entered.

  • "Natalya Ilynichna," Pierre began, dropping his eyes with a feeling of pity for her and loathing for the thing he had to do, "whether it is true or not should make no difference to you, because..."

  • She was evidently unable to speak and made a sign with her hands that they should leave her alone.

  • In the evening he drove to his sister's to discuss with her how to arrange a meeting.

  • "Ah, Pierre," said the countess going up to her husband.

  • You promised Countess Rostova to marry her and were about to elope with her, is that so?

  • They are armed against you by the same experience of debauchery; but to promise a maid to marry her... to deceive, to kidnap....

  • Pierre drove to Marya Dmitrievna's to tell her of the fulfillment of her wish that Kuragin should be banished from Moscow.

  • Old Prince Bolkonski heard all the rumors current in the town from Mademoiselle Bourienne and had read the note to Princess Mary in which Natasha had broken off her engagement.

  • As soon as he reached Moscow, Prince Andrew had received from his father Natasha's note to Princess Mary breaking off her engagement (Mademoiselle Bourienne had purloined it from Princess Mary and given it to the old prince), and he heard from him the story of Natasha's elopement, with additions.

  • She sighed, looking toward the door of the room where Prince Andrew was, evidently intending to express her sympathy with his sorrow, but Pierre saw by her face that she was glad both at what had happened and at the way her brother had taken the news of Natasha's faithlessness.

  • I have received a refusal from Countess Rostova and have heard reports of your brother-in-law having sought her hand, or something of that kind.

  • "Here are her letters and her portrait," said he.

  • "I much regret her illness," said Prince Andrew; and he smiled like his father, coldly, maliciously, and unpleasantly.

  • Tell Countess Rostova that she was and is perfectly free and that I wish her all that is good.

  • Prince Andrew interrupted him and cried sharply: Yes, ask her hand again, be magnanimous, and so on?...

  • So you'll give her the packet?

  • Marya Dmitrievna only shrugged her shoulders.

  • When will her mother come?

  • Now mind, don't tell her everything! said she to Pierre.

  • One hasn't the heart to scold her, she is so much to be pitied.

  • He thought she would give him her hand as usual; but she, stepping up to him, stopped, breathing heavily, her arms hanging lifelessly just in the pose she used to stand in when she went to the middle of the ballroom to sing, but with quite a different expression of face.

  • Pierre sniffed as he looked at her, but did not speak.

  • Till then he had reproached her in his heart and tried to despise her, but he now felt so sorry for her that there was no room in his soul for reproach.

  • He took her hand and kissed it.

  • I am not worth it! exclaimed Natasha and turned to leave the room, but Pierre held her hand.

  • All men seemed so pitiful, so poor, in comparison with this feeling of tenderness and love he experienced: in comparison with that softened, grateful, last look she had given him through her tears.

  • Before leaving, Napoleon showed favor to the emperor, kings, and princes who had deserved it, reprimanded the kings and princes with whom he was dissatisfied, presented pearls and diamonds of his own--that is, which he had taken from other kings--to the Empress of Austria, and having, as his historian tells us, tenderly embraced the Empress Marie Louise--who regarded him as her husband, though he had left another wife in Paris--left her grieved by the parting which she seemed hardly able to bear.

  • Countess Bezukhova was present among other Russian ladies who had followed the sovereign from Petersburg to Vilna and eclipsed the refined Polish ladies by her massive, so-called Russian type of beauty.

  • The Emperor noticed her and honored her with a dance.

  • He was meeting Helene in Vilna after not having seen her for a long time and did not recall the past, but as Helene was enjoying the favors of a very important personage and Boris had only recently married, they met as good friends of long standing.

  • Boris, coolly looking at Helene's dazzling bare shoulders which emerged from a dark, gold-embroidered, gauze gown, talked to her of old acquaintances and at the same time, unaware of it himself and unnoticed by others, never for an instant ceased to observe the Emperor who was in the same room.

  • Having finished speaking to her, the Emperor looked inquiringly at Balashev and, evidently understanding that he only acted thus because there were important reasons for so doing, nodded slightly to the lady and turned to him.

  • To the alleged insanity of the Swedes, Balashev wished to reply that when Russia is on her side Sweden is practically an island: but Napoleon gave an angry exclamation to drown his voice.

  • In the evening, when Prince Andrew went to him and, trying to rouse him, began to tell him of the young Count Kamensky's campaign, the old prince began unexpectedly to talk about Princess Mary, blaming her for her superstitions and her dislike of Mademoiselle Bourienne, who, he said, was the only person really attached to him.

  • The old prince knew very well that he tormented his daughter and that her life was very hard, but he also knew that he could not help tormenting her and that she deserved it.

  • If there is any misunderstanding and discord between you and Mary, I can't blame her for it at all.

  • As soon as she began to speak of that, her lips trembled and her tears began to fall.

  • She understood that when speaking of "trash" he referred not only to Mademoiselle Bourienne, the cause of her misery, but also to the man who had ruined his own happiness.

  • And giving her no further reply, he began thinking of the glad vindictive moment when he would meet Kuragin who he knew was now in the army.

  • Before the beginning of the campaign, Rostov had received a letter from his parents in which they told him briefly of Natasha's illness and the breaking off of her engagement to Prince Andrew (which they explained by Natasha's having rejected him) and again asked Nicholas to retire from the army and return home.

  • On receiving this letter, Nicholas did not even make any attempt to get leave of absence or to retire from the army, but wrote to his parents that he was sorry Natasha was ill and her engagement broken off, and that he would do all he could to meet their wishes.

  • The doctor, whether from lack of means or because he did not like to part from his young wife in the early days of their marriage, took her about with him wherever the hussar regiment went and his jealousy had become a standing joke among the hussar officers.

  • Her husband, the doctor, lay asleep behind her.

  • All the officers appeared to be, and really were, in love with her that evening.

  • She, seeing herself surrounded by such brilliant and polite young men, beamed with satisfaction, try as she might to hide it, and perturbed as she evidently was each time her husband moved in his sleep behind her.

  • They drew lots to settle who should make up her set.

  • As it is, she is Queen, and her word is law!

  • As soon as he had left the room all the officers burst into loud laughter and Mary Hendrikhovna blushed till her eyes filled with tears and thereby became still more attractive to them.

  • When he had gone, taking his wife with him, and had settled down with her in their covered cart, the officers lay down in the tavern, covering themselves with their wet cloaks, but they did not sleep for a long time; now they exchanged remarks, recalling the doctor's uneasiness and his wife's delight, now they ran out into the porch and reported what was taking place in the covered trap.

  • As they left the tavern in the twilight of the dawn, Rostov and Ilyin both glanced under the wet and glistening leather hood of the doctor's cart, from under the apron of which his feet were sticking out, and in the middle of which his wife's nightcap was visible and her sleepy breathing audible.

  • Natasha's illness was so serious that, fortunately for her and for her parents, the consideration of all that had caused the illness, her conduct and the breaking off of her engagement, receded into the background.

  • Doctors came to see her singly and in consultation, talked much in French, German, and Latin, blamed one another, and prescribed a great variety of medicines for all the diseases known to them, but the simple idea never occurred to any of them that they could not know the disease Natasha was suffering from, as no disease suffered by a live man can be known, for every living person has his own peculiarities and always has his own peculiar, personal, novel, complicated disease, unknown to medicine--not a disease of the lungs, liver, skin, heart, nerves, and so on mentioned in medical books, but a disease consisting of one of the innumerable combinations of the maladies of those organs.

  • The doctors were of use to Natasha because they kissed and rubbed her bump, assuring her that it would soon pass if only the coachman went to the chemist's in the Arbat and got a powder and some pills in a pretty box for a ruble and seventy kopeks, and if she took those powders in boiled water at intervals of precisely two hours, neither more nor less.

  • "You'll never get well like that," she would say, forgetting her grief in her vexation, "if you won't obey the doctor and take your medicine at the right time!

  • Even to Natasha herself it was pleasant to see that so many sacrifices were being made for her sake, and to know that she had to take medicine at certain hours, though she declared that no medicine would cure her and that it was all nonsense.

  • And it was even pleasant to be able to show, by disregarding the orders, that she did not believe in medical treatment and did not value her life.

  • The doctor came every day, felt her pulse, looked at her tongue, and regardless of her grief-stricken face joked with her.

  • The doctors said that she could not get on without medical treatment, so they kept her in the stifling atmosphere of the town, and the Rostovs did not move to the country that summer of 1812.

  • Natasha's grief began to be overlaid by the impressions of daily life, it ceased to press so painfully on her heart, it gradually faded into the past, and she began to recover physically.

  • She not merely avoided all external forms of pleasure--balls, promenades, concerts, and theaters--but she never laughed without a sound of tears in her laughter.

  • Laughter and singing in particular seemed to her like a blasphemy, in face of her sorrow.

  • Without any need of self-restraint, no wish to coquet ever entered her head.

  • She said and felt at that time that no man was more to her than Nastasya Ivanovna, the buffoon.

  • Something stood sentinel within her and forbade her every joy.

  • Her presentiment at the time had not deceived her--that that state of freedom and readiness for any enjoyment would not return again.

  • Her presentiment at the time had not deceived her--that that state of freedom and readiness for any enjoyment would not return again.

  • It comforted her to reflect that she was not better as she had formerly imagined, but worse, much worse, than anybody else in the world.

  • She kept away from everyone in the house and felt at ease only with her brother Petya.

  • But she was not even grateful to him for it; nothing good on Pierre's part seemed to her to be an effort, it seemed so natural for him to be kind to everyone that there was no merit in his kindness.

  • Sometimes Natasha noticed embarrassment and awkwardness on his part in her presence, especially when he wanted to do something to please her, or feared that something they spoke of would awaken memories distressing to her.

  • After those involuntary words--that if he were free he would have asked on his knees for her hand and her love--uttered at a moment when she was so strongly agitated, Pierre never spoke to Natasha of his feelings; and it seemed plain to her that those words, which had then so comforted her, were spoken as all sorts of meaningless words are spoken to comfort a crying child.

  • When she understood them her personal feeling became interwoven in the prayers with shades of its own.

  • On her way home at an early hour when she met no one but bricklayers going to work or men sweeping the street, and everybody within the houses was still asleep, Natasha experienced a feeling new to her, a sense of the possibility of correcting her faults, the possibility of a new, clean life, and of happiness.

  • The doctor who came to see her that day ordered her to continue the powders he had prescribed a fortnight previously.

  • The last medicine has done her a very great deal of good.

  • The countess, with a cheerful expression on her face, looked down at her nails and spat a little for luck as she returned to the drawing room.

  • As Natasha, at her mother's side, passed through the crowd behind a liveried footman who cleared the way for them, she heard a young man speaking about her in too loud a whisper.

  • It always seemed to her that everyone who looked at her was thinking only of what had happened to her.

  • With a sinking heart, wretched as she always was now when she found herself in a crowd, Natasha in her lilac silk dress trimmed with black lace walked- -as women can walk--with the more repose and stateliness the greater the pain and shame in her soul.

  • She knew for certain that she was pretty, but this no longer gave her satisfaction as it used to.

  • On the contrary it tormented her more than anything else of late, and particularly so on this bright, hot summer day in town.

  • She stood by her mother's side and exchanged nods with acquaintances near her.

  • From habit she scrutinized the ladies' dresses, condemned the bearing of a lady standing close by who was not crossing herself properly but in a cramped manner, and again she thought with vexation that she was herself being judged and was judging others, and suddenly, at the sound of the service, she felt horrified at her own vileness, horrified that the former purity of her soul was again lost to her.

  • When they prayed for the warriors, she thought of her brother and Denisov.

  • When they prayed for all traveling by land and sea, she remembered Prince Andrew, prayed for him, and asked God to forgive her all the wrongs she had done him.

  • When they prayed for those who love us, she prayed for the members of her own family, her father and mother and Sonya, realizing for the first time how wrongly she had acted toward them, and feeling all the strength of her love for them.

  • When they prayed for those who hate us, she tried to think of her enemies and people who hated her, in order to pray for them.

  • She included among her enemies the creditors and all who had business dealings with her father, and always at the thought of enemies and those who hated her she remembered Anatole who had done her so much harm--and though he did not hate her she gladly prayed for him as for an enemy.

  • Only at prayer did she feel able to think clearly and calmly of Prince Andrew and Anatole, as men for whom her feelings were as nothing compared with her awe and devotion to God.

  • Take me, take me! prayed Natasha, with impatient emotion in her heart, not crossing herself but letting her slender arms hang down as if expecting some invisible power at any moment to take her and deliver her from herself, from her regrets, desires, remorse, hopes, and sins.

  • The countess looked round several times at her daughter's softened face and shining eyes and prayed God to help her.

  • In Natasha's receptive condition of soul this prayer affected her strongly.

  • She shared with all her heart in the prayer for the spirit of righteousness, for the strengthening of the heart by faith and hope, and its animation by love.

  • And it seemed to her that God heard her prayer.

  • "Wherefore?" which had come to him amid every occupation, was now replaced, not by another question or by a reply to the former question, but by her image.

  • She smiled at me yesterday and asked me to come again, and I love her, and no one will ever know it.

  • Even before he saw her, while taking off his cloak, he heard her.

  • He knew that she had not sung since her illness, and so the sound of her voice surprised and delighted him.

  • He opened the door softly and saw her, in the lilac dress she had worn at church, walking about the room singing.

  • She had her back to him when he opened the door, but when, turning quickly, she saw his broad, surprised face, she blushed and came rapidly up to him.

  • "Count, is it wrong of me to sing?" she said blushing, and fixing her eyes inquiringly on him.

  • She spoke rapidly and did not notice how Pierre flushed at her words.

  • What do you think?"--she was speaking hurriedly, evidently afraid her strength might fail her-- "Will he ever forgive me?

  • Tears suddenly rose in her eyes, she turned away, lifted her music before her eyes, began singing again, and again began walking up and down the room.

  • Sonya read painstakingly in her high-pitched voice.

  • Natasha sat erect, gazing with a searching look now at her father and now at Pierre.

  • Pierre felt her eyes on him and tried not to look round.

  • The countess shook her head disapprovingly and angrily at every solemn expression in the manifesto.

  • In all these words she saw only that the danger threatening her son would not soon be over.

  • Before Shinshin had time to utter the joke he was ready to make on the count's patriotism, Natasha jumped up from her place and ran to her father.

  • "What a darling our Papa is!" she cried, kissing him, and she again looked at Pierre with the unconscious coquetry that had returned to her with her better spirits.

  • The countess, in dismay, looked up to heaven, clasped her hands, and turned angrily to her husband.

  • Be quiet, I tell you! cried the count, with a glance at his wife, who had turned pale and was staring fixedly at her son.

  • He tried to smile but could not: his smile expressed suffering, and he silently kissed her hand and went out.

  • A tradesman's wife standing beside Petya sobbed, and the tears ran down her cheeks.

  • Dear one! she kept repeating, wiping away her tears with her fingers.

  • A tradesman's wife was showing a rent in her shawl and telling how much the shawl had cost; another was saying that all silk goods had now got dear.

  • He sprang forward and upset an old woman who was catching at a biscuit; the old woman did not consider herself defeated though she was lying on the ground--she grabbed at some biscuits but her hand did not reach them.

  • Petya pushed her hand away with his knee, seized a biscuit, and as if fearing to be too late, again shouted "Hurrah!" with a voice already hoarse.

  • Princess Mary noticed to her surprise that during this illness the old prince not only excluded her from his room, but did not admit Mademoiselle Bourienne either.

  • Princess Mary spent half of every day with little Nicholas, watching his lessons, teaching him Russian and music herself, and talking to Dessalles; the rest of the day she spent over her books, with her old nurse, or with "God's folk" who sometimes came by the back door to see her.

  • She feared for her brother who was in it, was horrified by and amazed at the strange cruelty that impels men to kill one another, but she did not understand the significance of this war, which seemed to her like all previous wars.

  • On moving to the drawing room he handed the letter to Princess Mary and, spreading out before him the plan of the new building and fixing his eyes upon it, told her to read the letter aloud.

  • Beat her... dragged her about so!...

  • And he began beating and pulling her about so!

  • "You brute, you murderer!" screamed a thin, pale woman who, with a baby in her arms and her kerchief torn from her head, burst through the door at that moment and down the steps into the yard.

  • Ferapontov's wife, who till then had not ceased wailing under the shed, became quiet and with the baby in her arms went to the gate, listening to the sounds and looking in silence at the people.

  • "What marvels!" she exclaimed, but hearing her master's voice she turned back, pulling down her tucked-up skirt.

  • The loudest sound in that crowd was her wailing.

  • The mistress rocked and hushed her baby and when anyone came into the cellar asked in a pathetic whisper what had become of her husband who had remained in the street.

  • On seeing the young master, the elder one with frightened look clutched her younger companion by the hand and hid with her behind a birch tree, not stopping to pick up some green plums they had dropped.

  • The "man of great merit," who was still a novice in court circles, wishing to flatter Anna Pavlovna by defending her former position on this question, observed:

  • Princess Mary, alarmed by her father's feverish and sleepless activity after his previous apathy, could not bring herself to leave him alone and for the first time in her life ventured to disobey him.

  • She refused to go away and her father's fury broke over her in a terrible storm.

  • Trying to convict her, he told her she had worn him out, had caused his quarrel with his son, had harbored nasty suspicions of him, making it the object of her life to poison his existence, and he drove her from his study telling her that if she did not go away it was all the same to him.

  • He declared that he did not wish to remember her existence and warned her not to dare to let him see her.

  • The fact that he did not, as she had feared, order her to be carried away by force but only told her not to let him see her cheered Princess Mary.

  • She sat by the window listening to his voice which reached her from the garden.

  • A large crowd of militiamen and domestics were moving toward her, and in their midst several men were supporting by the armpits and dragging along a little old man in a uniform and decorations.

  • The doctor said this restlessness did not mean anything and was due to physical causes; but Princess Mary thought he wished to tell her something, and the fact that her presence always increased his restlessness confirmed her opinion.

  • Strange as it was to her to acknowledge this feeling in herself, yet there it was.

  • Thoughts that had not entered her mind for years--thoughts of a life free from the fear of her father, and even the possibility of love and of family happiness--floated continually in her imagination like temptations of the devil.

  • Thrust them aside as she would, questions continually recurred to her as to how she would order her life now, after that.

  • The cares of preparation and giving orders, for which everyone came to her, occupied her all day.

  • Several times she listened at the door, and it seemed to her that his mutterings were louder than usual and that they turned him over oftener.

  • She knew that her going in during the night at an unusual hour would irritate him.

  • She recalled all her life with him and in every word and act of his found an expression of his love of her.

  • Occasionally amid these memories temptations of the devil would surge into her imagination: thoughts of how things would be after his death, and how her new, liberated life would be ordered.

  • That sincerity which often comes with waking showed her clearly what chiefly concerned her about her father's illness.

  • She washed, dressed, said her prayers, and went out to the porch.

  • Princess Mary stopped at the porch, still horrified by her spiritual baseness and trying to arrange her thoughts before going to her father.

  • Princess Mary entered her father's room and went up to his bed.

  • He twitched her hand, and his brows and lips quivered angrily.

  • When she changed her position so that his left eye could see her face he calmed down, not taking his eyes off her for some seconds.

  • Then his lips and tongue moved, sounds came, and he began to speak, gazing timidly and imploringly at her, evidently afraid that she might not understand.

  • Straining all her faculties Princess Mary looked at him.

  • The comic efforts with which he moved his tongue made her drop her eyes and with difficulty repress the sobs that rose to her throat.

  • He made a mumbling sound in confirmation of this, took her hand, and began pressing it to different parts of his breast as if trying to find the right place for it.

  • Princess Mary pressed her head against his hand, trying to hide her sobs and tears.

  • He moved his hand over her hair.

  • "If only I had known..." she said through her tears.

  • He pressed her hand.

  • "No, I did not sleep," said Princess Mary, shaking her head.

  • Unconsciously imitating her father, she now tried to express herself as he did, as much as possible by signs, and her tongue too seemed to move with difficulty.

  • Princess Mary could not quite make out what he had said, but from his look it was clear that he had uttered a tender caressing word such as he had never used to her before.

  • He glanced at her with timid surprise.

  • She could understand nothing, think of nothing and feel nothing, except passionate love for her father, love such as she thought she had never felt till that moment.

  • Princess Mary murmured, pacing the garden with hurried steps and pressing her hands to her bosom which heaved with convulsive sobs.

  • This was the Marshal of the Nobility of the district, who had come personally to point out to the princess the necessity for her prompt departure.

  • She rose and saw Dunyasha her maid, who was evidently looking for her, and who stopped suddenly as if in alarm on seeing her mistress.

  • You must be prepared for everything, said the Marshal, meeting her at the house door.

  • She pushed him aside and ran to her father's door.

  • In the room were her nurse and other women.

  • "No, he's not dead--it's impossible!" she told herself and approached him, and repressing the terror that seized her, she pressed her lips to his cheek.

  • And hiding her face in her hands, Princess Mary sank into the arms of the doctor, who held her up.

  • He had told her that after the sixteenth he could not be responsible for what might happen.

  • After her father's funeral Princess Mary shut herself up in her room and did not admit anyone.

  • She lay on the sofa with her face to the wall, fingering the buttons of the leather cushion and seeing nothing but that cushion, and her confused thoughts were centered on one subject--the irrevocability of death and her own spiritual baseness, which she had not suspected, but which had shown itself during her father's illness.

  • She wished to pray but did not dare to, dared not in her present state of mind address herself to God.

  • The flow of her thoughts suddenly stopped.

  • Unconsciously she sat up, smoothed her hair, got up, and went to the window, involuntarily inhaling the freshness of the clear but windy evening.

  • He is gone and no one will hinder you, she said to herself, and sinking into a chair she let her head fall on the window sill.

  • Someone spoke her name in a soft and tender voice from the garden and kissed her head.

  • She softly approached Princess Mary, sighed, kissed her, and immediately began to cry.

  • All their former disharmony and her own jealousy recurred to her mind.

  • But she remembered too how he had changed of late toward Mademoiselle Bourienne and could not bear to see her, thereby showing how unjust were the reproaches Princess Mary had mentally addressed to her.

  • She felt sorry for her and held out her hand with a glance of gentle inquiry.

  • She said her only consolation was the fact that the princess allowed her to share her sorrow, that all the old misunderstandings should sink into nothing but this great grief; that she felt herself blameless in regard to everyone, and that he, from above, saw her affection and gratitude.

  • The princess heard her, not heeding her words but occasionally looking up at her and listening to the sound of her voice.

  • Princess Mary looked at her companion without understanding what she was talking about.

  • Mademoiselle Bourienne took from her reticule a proclamation (not printed on ordinary Russian paper) of General Rameau's, telling people not to leave their homes and that the French authorities would afford them proper protection.

  • Princess Mary read the paper, and her face began to quiver with stifled sobs.

  • This idea horrified her, made her shudder, blush, and feel such a rush of anger and pride as she had never experienced before.

  • All that was distressing, and especially all that was humiliating, in her position rose vividly to her mind.

  • For herself she did not care where she remained or what happened to her, but she felt herself the representative of her dead father and of Prince Andrew.

  • She went into Prince Andrew's study, trying to enter completely into his ideas, and considered her position.

  • The demands of life, which had seemed to her annihilated by her father's death, all at once rose before her with a new, previously unknown force and took possession of her.

  • "Dronushka," she said, regarding as a sure friend this Dronushka who always used to bring a special kind of gingerbread from his visit to the fair at Vyazma every year and smilingly offer it to her, "Dronushka, now since our misfortune..." she began, but could not go on.

  • To Princess Mary it was strange that now, at a moment when such sorrow was filling her soul, there could be rich people and poor, and the rich could refrain from helping the poor.

  • She also knew that neither her father nor her brother would refuse to help the peasants in need, she only feared to make some mistake in speaking about the distribution of the grain she wished to give.

  • She was glad such cares presented themselves, enabling her without scruple to forget her own grief.

  • Princess Mary did not understand what he wanted of her or why he was asking to be discharged.

  • Princess Mary lowered her eyes and, tripping over her skirt, came close up to them.

  • So many different eyes, old and young, were fixed on her, and there were so many different faces, that she could not distinguish any of them and, feeling that she must speak to them all at once, did not know how to do it.

  • But again the sense that she represented her father and her brother gave her courage, and she boldly began her speech.

  • All eyes were gazing at her with one and the same expression.

  • "Why don't you speak?" she inquired of a very old man who stood just in front of her leaning on his stick.

  • But her voice was drowned by the voices of the crowd.

  • Again Princess Mary tried to catch someone's eye, but not a single eye in the crowd was turned to her; evidently they were all trying to avoid her look.

  • Follow her into slavery!

  • Having repeated her order to Dron to have horses ready for her departure next morning, she went to her room and remained alone with her own thoughts.

  • For a long time that night Princess Mary sat by the open window of her room hearing the sound of the peasants' voices that reached her from the village, but it was not of them she was thinking.

  • She thought only of one thing, her sorrow, which, after the break caused by cares for the present, seemed already to belong to the past.

  • Pictures of the near past--her father's illness and last moments--rose one after another to her memory.

  • And these pictures presented themselves to her so clearly and in such detail that they seemed now present, now past, and now future.

  • And Princess Mary uttered aloud the caressing word he had said to her on the day of his death.

  • "Dear-est!" she repeated, and began sobbing, with tears that relieved her soul.

  • And the horror that had seized her when she touched him and convinced herself that that was not he, but something mysterious and horrible, seized her again.

  • With wide-open eyes she gazed at the moonlight and the shadows, expecting every moment to see his dead face, and she felt that the silence brooding over the house and within it held her fast.

  • "Dunyasha!" she screamed wildly, and tearing herself out of this silence she ran to the servants' quarters to meet her old nurse and the maidservants who came running toward her.

  • At the moment when Rostov and Ilyin were galloping along the road, Princess Mary, despite the dissuasions of Alpatych, her nurse, and the maids, had given orders to harness and intended to start, but when the cavalrymen were espied they were taken for Frenchmen, the coachman ran away, and the women in the house began to wail.

  • What gentleness and nobility there are in her features and expression! thought he as he looked at her and listened to her timid story.

  • When she began to tell him that all this had happened the day after her father's funeral, her voice trembled.

  • She turned away, and then, as if fearing he might take her words as meant to move him to pity, looked at him with an apprehensive glance of inquiry.

  • Princess Mary noticed this and glanced gratefully at him with that radiant look which caused the plainness of her face to be forgotten.

  • Ah, friend--my pink one is delicious; her name is Dunyasha....

  • Unwilling to obtrude himself on the princess, Rostov did not go back to the house but remained in the village awaiting her departure.

  • When her carriage drove out of the house, he mounted and accompanied her eight miles from Bogucharovo to where the road was occupied by our troops.

  • At the inn at Yankovo he respectfully took leave of her, for the first time permitting himself to kiss her hand.

  • But the princess, if she did not again thank him in words, thanked him with the whole expression of her face, radiant with gratitude and tenderness.

  • His kind, honest eyes, with the tears rising in them when she herself had begun to cry as she spoke of her loss, did not leave her memory.

  • When she had taken leave of him and remained alone she suddenly felt her eyes filling with tears, and then not for the first time the strange question presented itself to her: did she love him?

  • On the rest of the way to Moscow, though the princess' position was not a cheerful one, Dunyasha, who went with her in the carriage, more than once noticed that her mistress leaned out of the window and smiled at something with an expression of mingled joy and sorrow.

  • It was at those moments that Dunyasha noticed her smiling as she looked out of the carriage window.

  • To remember her gave him pleasure, and when his comrades, hearing of his adventure at Bogucharovo, rallied him on having gone to look for hay and having picked up one of the wealthiest heiresses in Russia, he grew angry.

  • Prince Andrew knew Denisov from what Natasha had told him of her first suitor.

  • Several times on glancing that way he noticed behind that door a plump, rosy, handsome woman in a pink dress with a lilac silk kerchief on her head, holding a dish and evidently awaiting the entrance of the commander-in-chief.

  • Her husband has welcomed his Serene Highness with the cross at the church, and she intends to welcome him in the house....

  • He screwed up his eyes, smiled, lifted her chin with his hand, and said:

  • The priest's wife smiled, and with dimples in her rosy cheeks followed him into the room.

  • "You don't spare anyone," said Julie Drubetskaya as she collected and pressed together a bunch of raveled lint with her thin, beringed fingers.

  • Natalie has recovered her looks and is brighter.

  • Do you know that she has lost her father?

  • I should like very much to see her, said Pierre.

  • I spent the evening with her yesterday.

  • She is going to their estate near Moscow either today or tomorrow morning, with her nephew.

  • She was surrounded, and they wanted to kill her and had wounded some of her people.

  • "On the contrary, things seem satisfactory, ma cousine," said Pierre in the bantering tone he habitually adopted toward her, always feeling uncomfortable in the role of her benefactor.

  • He showed her the broadsheet.

  • Barbara Ivanovna told me the mob near killed her because she said something in French.

  • There they are... bringing her, coming...

  • They are bringing her, our Protectress!...

  • I believed in some ideal love which was to keep her faithful to me for the whole year of my absence!

  • While Russia was well, a foreigner could serve her and be a splendid minister; but as soon as she is in danger she needs one of her own kin.

  • Natasha with animated and excited face was telling him how she had gone to look for mushrooms the previous summer and had lost her way in the big forest.

  • She incoherently described the depths of the forest, her feelings, and a talk with a beekeeper she met, and constantly interrupted her story to say: No, I can't!

  • I'm not telling it right; no, you don't understand, though he encouraged her by saying that he did understand, and he really had understood all she wanted to say.

  • Prince Andrew smiled now the same happy smile as then when he had looked into her eyes.

  • "I understood her," he thought.

  • "I not only understood her, but it was just that inner, spiritual force, that sincerity, that frankness of soul-- that very soul of hers which seemed to be fettered by her body--it was that soul I loved in her... loved so strongly and happily..." and suddenly he remembered how his love had ended.

  • He only saw in her a pretty and fresh young girl, with whom he did not deign to unite his fate.

  • "No it's not that, but her action seems so jerky," said Pierre in a puzzled tone.

  • Get her leg out!

  • On returning to France, to the bosom of the great, strong, magnificent, peaceful, and glorious fatherland, I should have proclaimed her frontiers immutable; all future wars purely defensive, all aggrandizement antinational.

  • "Granddad" himself, as Malasha in her own mind called Kutuzov, sat apart in a dark corner behind the oven.

  • Malasha, who kept her eyes fixed on what was going on before her, understood the meaning of the council differently.

  • It seemed to her that it was only a personal struggle between "Granddad" and "Long-coat" as she termed Bennigsen.

  • In the midst of the conversation she noticed "Granddad" give Bennigsen a quick, subtle glance, and then to her joys she saw that "Granddad" said something to "Long-coat" which settled him.

  • Helene was faced by a new problem--how to preserve her intimacy with both without offending either.

  • What would have seemed difficult or even impossible to another woman did not cause the least embarrassment to Countess Bezukhova, who evidently deserved her reputation of being a very clever woman.

  • Had she attempted concealment, or tried to extricate herself from her awkward position by cunning, she would have spoiled her case by acknowledging herself guilty.

  • The first time the young foreigner allowed himself to reproach her, she lifted her beautiful head and, half turning to him, said firmly: That's just like a man--selfish and cruel!

  • A woman sacrifices herself for you, she suffers, and this is her reward!

  • Helene was touched, and more than once tears rose to her eyes and to those of Monsieur de Jobert and their voices trembled.

  • The enchanting, middle-aged Frenchman laid his hands on her head and, as she herself afterward described it, she felt something like a fresh breeze wafted into her soul.

  • It was explained to her that this was la grace.

  • She confessed to him, and he absolved her from her sins.

  • All that was done around her and to her at this time, all the attention devoted to her by so many clever men and expressed in such pleasant, refined ways, and the state of dove-like purity she was now in (she wore only white dresses and white ribbons all that time) gave her pleasure, but her pleasure did not cause her for a moment to forget her aim.

  • And as it always happens in contests of cunning that a stupid person gets the better of cleverer ones, Helene--having realized that the main object of all these words and all this trouble was, after converting her to Catholicism, to obtain money from her for Jesuit institutions (as to which she received indications)-before parting with her money insisted that the various operations necessary to free her from her husband should be performed.

  • In her view the aim of every religion was merely to preserve certain proprieties while affording satisfaction to human desires.

  • The director of her conscience was astounded at having the case presented to him thus with the simplicity of Columbus' egg.

  • Only Marya Dmitrievna Akhrosimova, who had come to Petersburg that summer to see one of her sons, allowed herself plainly to express an opinion contrary to the general one.

  • It is done in all the brothels, and with these words Marya Dmitrievna, turning up her wide sleeves with her usual threatening gesture and glancing sternly round, moved across the room.

  • Though people were afraid of Marya Dmitrievna she was regarded in Petersburg as a buffoon, and so of what she had said they only noticed, and repeated in a whisper, the one coarse word she had used, supposing the whole sting of her remark to lie in that word.

  • "Helene, I have a word to say to you," and he would lead her aside, drawing her hand downward.

  • "Listen, Bilibin," said Helene (she always called friends of that sort by their surnames), and she touched his coat sleeve with her white, beringed fingers.

  • She was continually tormented by jealousy of her daughter, and now that jealousy concerned a subject near to her own heart, she could not reconcile herself to the idea.

  • She consulted a Russian priest as to the possibility of divorce and remarriage during a husband's lifetime, and the priest told her that it was impossible, and to her delight showed her a text in the Gospel which (as it seemed to him) plainly forbids remarriage while the husband is alive.

  • Armed with these arguments, which appeared to her unanswerable, she drove to her daughter's early one morning so as to find her alone.

  • Having listened to her mother's objections, Helene smiled blandly and ironically.

  • "But it says plainly: 'Whosoever shall marry her that is divorced...'" said the old princess.

  • The princess nodded to her daughter and sidled out of the room.

  • "Yes, she is right," thought the old princess, all her convictions dissipated by the appearance of His Highness.

  • The thought that both her sons were at the war, had both gone from under her wing, that today or tomorrow either or both of them might be killed like the three sons of one of her acquaintances, struck her that summer for the first time with cruel clearness.

  • The countess did not sleep at night, or when she did fall asleep dreamed that she saw her sons lying dead.

  • Though Petya would remain in the service, this transfer would give the countess the consolation of seeing at least one of her sons under her wing, and she hoped to arrange matters for her Petya so as not to let him go again, but always get him appointed to places where he could not possibly take part in a battle.

  • The presence of Sonya, of her beloved Natasha, or even of her husband irritated her.

  • Though she concealed from him her intention of keeping him under her wing, Petya guessed her designs, and instinctively fearing that he might give way to emotion when with her--might "become womanish" as he termed it to himself--he treated her coldly, avoided her, and during his stay in Moscow attached himself exclusively to Natasha for whom he had always had a particularly brotherly tenderness, almost lover-like.

  • The countess watched the things being packed, was dissatisfied with everything, was constantly in pursuit of Petya who was always running away from her, and was jealous of Natasha with whom he spent all his time.

  • Nicholas' letter in which he mentioned Princess Mary had elicited, in her presence, joyous comments from the countess, who saw an intervention of Providence in this meeting of the princess and Nicholas.

  • But despite her grief, or perhaps just because of it, she took on herself all the difficult work of directing the storing and packing of their things and was busy for whole days.

  • The count and countess turned to her when they had any orders to give.

  • For a while she had stood beside Sonya while the china was being packed and tried to help, but soon gave it up and went to her room to pack her own things.

  • She was roused from her reverie by the talk of the maids in the next room (which was theirs) and by the sound of their hurried footsteps going to the back porch.

  • Natasha, throwing a clean pocket handkerchief over her hair and holding an end of it in each hand, went out into the street.

  • Natasha moved a few steps forward and stopped shyly, still holding her handkerchief, and listened to what the housekeeper was saying.

  • Natasha quietly repeated her question, and her face and whole manner were so serious, though she was still holding the ends of her handkerchief, that the major ceased smiling and after some reflection-- as if considering in how far the thing was possible--replied in the affirmative.

  • With a slight inclination of her head, Natasha stepped back quickly to Mavra Kuzminichna, who stood talking compassionately to the officer.

  • Natasha was evidently pleased to be dealing with new people outside the ordinary routine of her life.

  • "I knew you'd give permission... so I'll tell them," and, having kissed her mother, Natasha got up and went to the door.

  • In the hall she met her father, who had returned with bad news.

  • The countess looked with timid horror at her son's eager, excited face as he said this.

  • She had taken a cab and driven home by a side street and the cabman had told her that the people were breaking open the barrels at the drink store, having received orders to do so.

  • Sonya, owing to the count's contradictory orders, lost her head and did not know what to do.

  • At first her intervention in the business of packing was received skeptically.

  • "I won't!" cried Natasha, with one hand holding back the hair that hung over her perspiring face, while with the other she pressed down the carpets.

  • She at once set to work afresh and they now trusted her completely.

  • The count was not angry even when they told him that Natasha had countermanded an order of his, and the servants now came to her to ask whether a cart was sufficiently loaded, and whether it might be corded up.

  • The countess sent for her husband.

  • She was accustomed always to oppose anything announced in that timid tone and considered it her duty to do so.

  • "Papa, what are you doing that for?" asked Natasha, who had followed him into her mother's room.

  • "Altogether such heroism as was displayed by the Russian warriors cannot be imagined or adequately praised!" said Berg, glancing round at Natasha, and as if anxious to conciliate her, replying to her intent look with a smile.

  • 'Russia is not in Moscow, she lives in the hearts of her sons!'

  • Berg hurriedly jumped up, kissed her hand, asked about her health, and, swaying his head from side to side to express sympathy, remained standing beside her.

  • "I can't think what the servants are about," said the countess, turning to her husband.

  • I wish to give her a surprise, you see.

  • Natasha left the room with her father and, as if finding it difficult to reach some decision, first followed him and then ran downstairs.

  • Her throat quivered with convulsive sobs and, afraid of weakening and letting the force of her anger run to waste, she turned and rushed headlong up the stairs.

  • Her throat quivered with convulsive sobs and, afraid of weakening and letting the force of her anger run to waste, she turned and rushed headlong up the stairs.

  • Berg was sitting beside the countess consoling her with the respectful attention of a relative.

  • The count, pipe in hand, was pacing up and down the room, when Natasha, her face distorted by anger, burst in like a tempest and approached her mother with rapid steps.

  • Berg and the countess looked at her, perplexed and frightened.

  • The countess glanced at her daughter, saw her face full of shame for her mother, saw her agitation, and understood why her husband did not turn to look at her now, and she glanced round quite disconcerted.

  • But the countess pushed her daughter away and went up to her husband.

  • You know I don't understand about it, said she, dropping her eyes shamefacedly.

  • "The eggs... the eggs are teaching the hen," muttered the count through tears of joy, and he embraced his wife who was glad to hide her look of shame on his breast.

  • Sonya too was busy all this time, but the aim of her efforts was quite different from Natasha's.

  • The countess opened her eyes in dismay and, seizing Sonya's arm, glanced around.

  • The countess put her arms around Sonya and began to cry.

  • And the countess bent over her reticule to hide her agitated face.

  • Natasha looked at her inquiringly.

  • What is it? persisted Natasha with her quick intuition.

  • And Dunyasha, with clenched teeth, without replying but with an aggrieved look on her face, hastily got into the coach to rearrange the seat.

  • Efim, the old coachman, who was the only one the countess trusted to drive her, sat perched up high on the box and did not so much as glance round at what was going on behind him.

  • She did not know who was in it, but each time she looked at the procession her eyes sought that caleche.

  • This is wonderful! she cried, holding out her hand to him.

  • Pierre took her outstretched hand and kissed it awkwardly as he walked along beside her while the coach still moved on.

  • Natasha continued to lean out of the window for a long time, beaming at him with her kindly, slightly quizzical, happy smile.

  • His major-domo came in a second time to say that the Frenchman who had brought the letter from the countess was very anxious to see him if only for a minute, and that someone from Bazdeev's widow had called to ask Pierre to take charge of her husband's books, as she herself was leaving for the country.

  • Moscow seen from the Poklonny Hill lay spaciously spread out with her river, her gardens, and her churches, and she seemed to be living her usual life, her cupolas glittering like stars in the sunlight.

  • "A town captured by the enemy is like a maid who has lost her honor," thought he (he had said so to Tuchkov at Smolensk).

  • "I'll give you something gently, you monkey you!" cried Mavra Kuzminichna, raising her arm threateningly.

  • And as soon as the officer let go of the gate handle she turned and, hurrying away on her old legs, went through the back yard to the servants' quarters.

  • The conflict of magnanimity between the mother and the daughter, ending in the mother's sacrificing herself and offering her daughter in marriage to her lover, even now agitated the captain, though it was the memory of a distant past.

  • Afterwards when he had received a name and wealth he dared not think of her because he loved her too well, placing her far above everything in the world, and especially therefore above himself.

  • Speaking thickly and with a faraway look in his shining eyes, he told the whole story of his life: his marriage, Natasha's love for his best friend, her betrayal of him, and all his own simple relations with her.

  • She moved simply to be farther away from the wounded man.

  • Natasha, pale, with a fixed look, was sitting on the bench under the icons just where she had sat down on arriving and paid no attention to her father's words.

  • You can see it from the window, she said to her cousin, evidently wishing to distract her mind.

  • But Natasha looked at her as if not understanding what was said to her and again fixed her eyes on the corner of the stove.

  • Sonya had cried and begged to be forgiven and now, as if trying to atone for her fault, paid unceasing attention to her cousin.

  • And as if in order not to offend Sonya and to get rid of her, she turned her face to the window, looked out in such a way that it was evident that she could not see anything, and again settled down in her former attitude.

  • The countess went up to her daughter and touched her head with the back of her hand as she was wont to do when Natasha was ill, then touched her forehead with her lips as if to feel whether she was feverish, and finally kissed her.

  • She was planning something and either deciding or had already decided something in her mind.

  • She knew Prince Andrew was in the same yard as themselves and in a part of the hut across the passage; but this dreadful incessant moaning made her sob.

  • I'll lie down at once, said Natasha, and began hurriedly undressing, tugging at the tapes of her petticoat.

  • Her long, thin, practiced fingers rapidly unplaited, replaited, and tied up her plait.

  • Her long, thin, practiced fingers rapidly unplaited, replaited, and tied up her plait.

  • Her head moved from side to side from habit, but her eyes, feverishly wide, looked fixedly before her.

  • Her head moved from side to side from habit, but her eyes, feverishly wide, looked fixedly before her.

  • When her toilet for the night was finished she sank gently onto the sheet spread over the hay on the side nearest the door.

  • "Do lie down," she added crossly, and buried her face in the pillow.

  • For a long time Natasha listened attentively to the sounds that reached her from inside and outside the room and did not move.

  • First she heard her mother praying and sighing and the creaking of her bed under her, then Madame Schoss' familiar whistling snore and Sonya's gentle breathing.

  • Soon after that Natasha heard her mother's even breathing.

  • Natasha did not move, though her little bare foot, thrust out from under the quilt, was growing cold on the bare floor.

  • Natasha rose slowly and carefully, crossed herself, and stepped cautiously on the cold and dirty floor with her slim, supple, bare feet.

  • It seemed to her that something heavy was beating rhythmically against all the walls of the room: it was her own heart, sinking with alarm and terror and overflowing with love.

  • In her imagination he was that terrible moaning personified.

  • But an irresistible impulse drew her forward.

  • He was the same as ever, but the feverish color of his face, his glittering eyes rapturously turned toward her, and especially his neck, delicate as a child's, revealed by the turn-down collar of his shirt, gave him a peculiarly innocent, childlike look, such as she had never seen on him before.

  • She went up to him and with a swift, flexible, youthful movement dropped on her knees.

  • And he vividly pictured to himself Natasha, not as he had done in the past with nothing but her charms which gave him delight, but for the first time picturing to himself her soul.

  • And he understood her feelings, her sufferings, shame, and remorse.

  • He now understood for the first time all the cruelty of his rejection of her, the cruelty of his rupture with her.

  • If only it were possible for me to see her once more!

  • Natasha, motionless on her knees (she was unable to stir), with frightened eyes riveted on him, was restraining her sobs.

  • Her face was pale and rigid.

  • With a rapid but careful movement Natasha drew nearer to him on her knees and, taking his hand carefully, bent her face over it and began kissing it, just touching it lightly with her lips.

  • "Forgive me!" she whispered, raising her head and glancing at him.

  • "Forgive me for what I ha-ve do-ne!" faltered Natasha in a scarcely audible, broken whisper, and began kissing his hand more rapidly, just touching it with her lips.

  • "I love you more, better than before," said Prince Andrew, lifting her face with his hand so as to look into her eyes.

  • But Prince Andrew did not see that, he saw her shining eyes which were beautiful.

  • At that moment a maid sent by the countess, who had noticed her daughter's absence, knocked at the door.

  • Like a somnambulist aroused from her sleep Natasha went out of the room and, returning to her hut, fell sobbing on her bed.

  • A dirty, barefooted maid was sitting on a trunk, and, having undone her pale-colored plait, was pulling it straight and sniffing at her singed hair.

  • "Dear people, good Christians, save me, help me, dear friends... help us, somebody," she muttered between her sobs.

  • "Don't, Mary Nikolievna!" said her husband to her in a low voice, evidently only to justify himself before the stranger.

  • "Sister must have taken her, or else where can she be?" he added.

  • Another man would have rescued her from the fire.

  • He held his head higher, his eyes shone with the light of life, and with swift steps he followed the maid, overtook her, and came out on the Povarskoy.

  • Ooh! lamented Aniska, who at the sight of the fire felt that she too must give expression to her feelings.

  • But seeing a stranger the sickly, scrofulous-looking child, unattractively like her mother, began to yell and run away.

  • Pierre, however, seized her and lifted her in his arms.

  • She screamed desperately and angrily and tried with her little hands to pull Pierre's hands away and to bite them with her slobbering mouth.

  • But he made an effort not to throw the child down and ran with her to the large house.

  • It was now, however, impossible to get back the way he had come; the maid, Aniska, was no longer there, and Pierre with a feeling of pity and disgust pressed the wet, painfully sobbing child to himself as tenderly as he could and ran with her through the garden seeking another way out.

  • He hurried to find the family of that civil servant in order to restore the daughter to her mother and go to save someone else.

  • She had now become quiet and, clinging with her little hands to Pierre's coat, sat on his arm gazing about her like some little wild animal.

  • He glanced at her occasionally with a slight smile.

  • That very young woman seemed to Pierre the perfection of Oriental beauty, with her sharply outlined, arched, black eyebrows and the extraordinarily soft, bright color of her long, beautiful, expressionless face.

  • Amid the scattered property and the crowd on the open space, she, in her rich satin cloak with a bright lilac shawl on her head, suggested a delicate exotic plant thrown out onto the snow.

  • She was sitting on some bundles a little behind the old woman, and looked from under her long lashes with motionless, large, almond-shaped eyes at the ground before her.

  • Evidently she was aware of her beauty and fearful because of it.

  • Her face struck Pierre and, hurrying along by the fence, he turned several times to look at her.

  • "Give her back to them, give her back!" he almost shouted, putting the child, who began screaming, on the ground, and again looking at the Frenchman and the Armenian family.

  • The beautiful Armenian still sat motionless and in the same attitude, with her long lashes drooping as if she did not see or feel what the soldier was doing to her.

  • While Pierre was running the few steps that separated him from the Frenchman, the tall marauder in the frieze gown was already tearing from her neck the necklace the young Armenian was wearing, and the young woman, clutching at her neck, screamed piercingly.

  • The Empress Elisabeth, however, when asked what instructions she would be pleased to give--with her characteristic Russian patriotism had replied that she could give no directions about state institutions for that was the affair of the sovereign, but as far as she personally was concerned she would be the last to quit Petersburg.

  • She had fallen ill unexpectedly a few days previously, had missed several gatherings of which she was usually ornament, and was said to be receiving no one, and instead of the celebrated Petersburg doctors who usually attended her had entrusted herself to some Italian doctor who was treating her in some new and unusual way.

  • Oh, she is certainly the most charming woman in the world, she went on, with a smile at her own enthusiasm.

  • We belong to different camps, but that does not prevent my esteeming her as she deserves.

  • Russia will shudder to learn of the abandonment of the city in which her greatness is centered and in which lie the ashes of your ancestors!

  • With the naive conviction of young men in a merry mood that other men's wives were created for them, Rostov did not leave the lady's side and treated her husband in a friendly and conspiratorial style, as if, without speaking of it, they knew how capitally Nicholas and the lady would get on together.

  • Her eyes" (Nicholas looked at his partner) "are blue, her mouth coral and ivory; her figure" (he glanced at her shoulders) "like Diana's...."

  • Her eyes" (Nicholas looked at his partner) "are blue, her mouth coral and ivory; her figure" (he glanced at her shoulders) "like Diana's...."

  • She has heard from her niece how you rescued her...

  • Her niece, Princess Bolkonskaya.

  • She is here in Voronezh with her aunt.

  • The governor's wife led him up to a tall and very stout old lady with a blue headdress, who had just finished her game of cards with the most important personages of the town.

  • This was Malvintseva, Princess Mary's aunt on her mother's side, a rich, childless widow who always lived in Voronezh.

  • When Rostov approached her she was standing settling up for the game.

  • She looked at him and, screwing up her eyes sternly, continued to upbraid the general who had won from her.

  • "Very pleased, mon cher," she then said, holding out her hand to Nicholas.

  • After a few words about Princess Mary and her late father, whom Malvintseva had evidently not liked, and having asked what Nicholas knew of Prince Andrew, who also was evidently no favorite of hers, the important old lady dismissed Nicholas after repeating her invitation to come to see her.

  • When he had parted from Malvintseva Nicholas wished to return to the dancing, but the governor's little wife placed her plump hand on his sleeve and, saying that she wanted to have a talk with him, led him to her sitting room, from which those who were there immediately withdrew so as not to be in her way.

  • "Do you know, dear boy," began the governor's wife with a serious expression on her kind little face, "that really would be the match for you: would you like me to arrange it?"

  • And on taking leave of the governor's wife, when she again smilingly said to him, "Well then, remember!" he drew her aside.

  • And as long as my sister Natasha was engaged to her brother it was of course out of the question for me to think of marrying her.

  • I love her, and promised to marry her, and will do so....

  • It would kill her, that's one thing.

  • "What a matchmaker you are, Aunt..." said Nicholas, kissing her plump little hand.

  • On reaching Moscow after her meeting with Rostov, Princess Mary had found her nephew there with his tutor, and a letter from Prince Andrew giving her instructions how to get to her Aunt Malvintseva at Voronezh.

  • Now, after a month passed in quiet surroundings, she felt more and more deeply the loss of her father which was associated in her mind with the ruin of Russia.

  • She was agitated and incessantly tortured by the thought of the dangers to which her brother, the only intimate person now remaining to her, was exposed.

  • The day after her party the governor's wife came to see Malvintseva and, after discussing her plan with the aunt, remarked that though under present circumstances a formal betrothal was, of course, not to be thought of, all the same the young people might be brought together and could get to know one another.

  • But Princess Mary experienced a painful rather than a joyful feeling--her mental tranquillity was destroyed, and desires, doubts, self-reproach, and hopes reawoke.

  • Assuming that she did go down to see him, Princess Mary imagined the words he would say to her and what she would say to him, and these words sometimes seemed undeservedly cold and then to mean too much.

  • More than anything she feared lest the confusion she felt might overwhelm her and betray her as soon as she saw him.

  • But when on Sunday after church the footman announced in the drawing room that Count Rostov had called, the princess showed no confusion, only a slight blush suffused her cheeks and her eyes lit up with a new and radiant light.

  • When Rostov entered the room, the princess dropped her eyes for an instant, as if to give the visitor time to greet her aunt, and then just as Nicholas turned to her she raised her head and met his look with shining eyes.

  • Either black is particularly becoming to her or she really has greatly improved without my having noticed it.

  • From the time Rostov entered, her face became suddenly transformed.

  • Rostov saw all this as clearly as if he had known her whole life.

  • She did not talk about her brother, diverting the conversation as soon as her aunt mentioned Andrew.

  • Evidently she could speak of Russia's misfortunes with a certain artificiality, but her brother was too near her heart and she neither could nor would speak lightly of him.

  • Nicholas blushed and was confused when people spoke to him about the princess (as she did when he was mentioned) and even when he thought of her, but in her presence he felt quite at ease, and said not at all what he had prepared, but what, quite appropriately, occurred to him at the moment.

  • But he never thought about her as he had thought of all the young ladies without exception whom he had met in society, nor as he had for a long time, and at one time rapturously, thought about Sonya.

  • He had pictured each of those young ladies as almost all honest-hearted young men do, that is, as a possible wife, adapting her in his imagination to all the conditions of married life: a white dressing gown, his wife at the tea table, his wife's carriage, little ones, Mamma and Papa, their relations to her, and so on--and these pictures of the future had given him pleasure.

  • Princess Mary, having learned of her brother's wound only from the Gazette and having no definite news of him, prepared (so Nicholas heard, he had not seen her again himself) to set off in search of Prince Andrew.

  • "Have you seen the princess?" she asked, indicating with a movement of her head a lady standing on the opposite side, beyond the choir.

  • Nicholas immediately recognized Princess Mary not so much by the profile he saw under her bonnet as by the feeling of solicitude, timidity, and pity that immediately overcame him.

  • Princess Mary, evidently engrossed by her thoughts, was crossing herself for the last time before leaving the church.

  • Nicholas looked at her face with surprise.

  • As had occurred before when she was present, Nicholas went up to her without waiting to be prompted by the governor's wife and not asking himself whether or not it was right and proper to address her here in church, and told her he had heard of her trouble and sympathized with his whole soul.

  • As soon as she heard his voice a vivid glow kindled in her face, lighting up both her sorrow and her joy.

  • "Oh, that would be so dread..." she began and, prevented by agitation from finishing, she bent her head with a movement as graceful as everything she did in his presence and, looking up at him gratefully, went out, following her aunt.

  • Princess Mary had made an agreeable impression on him when he had met her in Smolensk province.

  • His having encountered her in such exceptional circumstances, and his mother having at one time mentioned her to him as a good match, had drawn his particular attention to her.

  • When he met her again in Voronezh the impression she made on him was not merely pleasing but powerful.

  • That pale, sad, refined face, that radiant look, those gentle graceful gestures, and especially the deep and tender sorrow expressed in all her features agitated him and evoked his sympathy.

  • How he would propose to her and how she would become his wife.

  • It was plain that her whole soul was in her prayer.

  • Besides, I don't love her--not as I should.

  • The following day he saw Princess Mary off on her journey to Yaroslavl, and a few days later left to rejoin his regiment.

  • But a few days before they left Moscow, moved and excited by all that was going on, she called Sonya to her and, instead of reproaching and making demands on her, tearfully implored her to sacrifice herself and repay all that the family had done for her by breaking off her engagement with Nicholas.

  • Sonya burst into hysterical tears and replied through her sobs that she would do anything and was prepared for anything, but gave no actual promise and could not bring herself to decide to do what was demanded of her.

  • She must sacrifice herself for the family that had reared and brought her up.

  • Her position in the house was such that only by sacrifice could she show her worth, and she was accustomed to this and loved doing it.

  • Her position in the house was such that only by sacrifice could she show her worth, and she was accustomed to this and loved doing it.

  • But now they wanted her to sacrifice the very thing that constituted the whole reward for her self-sacrifice and the whole meaning of her life.

  • And for the first time Sonya felt that out of her pure, quiet love for Nicholas a passionate feeling was beginning to grow up which was stronger than principle, virtue, or religion.

  • But when she heard of Prince Andrew's presence in their house, despite her sincere pity for him and for Natasha, she was seized by a joyful and superstitious feeling that God did not intend her to be separated from Nicholas.

  • Despite all the terror of what had happened during those last days and during the first days of their journey, this feeling that Providence was intervening in her personal affairs cheered Sonya.

  • Not noticing the monk, who had risen to greet her and was drawing back the wide sleeve on his right arm, she went up to Sonya and took her hand.

  • As soon as the prior withdrew, Natasha took her friend by the hand and went with her into the unoccupied room.

  • Sonya was not less agitated than her friend by the latter's fear and grief and by her own personal feelings which she shared with no one.

  • Natasha opened it cautiously and glanced into the room, Sonya standing beside her at the half-open door.

  • Sonya suddenly almost screamed, catching her companion's arm and stepping back from the door.

  • "Yes, yes!" cried Natasha opening her eyes wide, and vaguely recalling that Sonya had told her something about Prince Andrew whom she had seen lying down.

  • I saw him lying on a bed," said she, making a gesture with her hand and a lifted finger at each detail, "and that he had his eyes closed and was covered just with a pink quilt, and that his hands were folded," she concluded, convincing herself that the details she had just seen were exactly what she had seen in the mirror.

  • She had in fact seen nothing then but had mentioned the first thing that came into her head, but what she had invented then seemed to her now as real as any other recollection.

  • She not only remembered what she had then said--that he turned to look at her and smiled and was covered with something red--but was firmly convinced that she had then seen and said that he was covered with a pink quilt and that his eyes were closed.

  • "Oh, I don't know, it is all so strange," replied Sonya, clutching at her head.

  • They had an opportunity that day to send letters to the army, and the countess was writing to her son.

  • "Sonya!" said the countess, raising her eyes from her letter as her niece passed, "Sonya, won't you write to Nicholas?"

  • She spoke in a soft, tremulous voice, and in the weary eyes that looked over her spectacles Sonya read all that the countess meant to convey with these words.

  • Sonya went up to the countess and, kneeling down, kissed her hand.

  • Sonya was softened, excited, and touched by all that had occurred that day, especially by the mysterious fulfillment she had just seen of her vision.

  • We had a little girl, but God took her before I went as a soldier.

  • When Princess Mary heard from Nicholas that her brother was with the Rostovs at Yaroslavl she at once prepared to go there, in spite of her aunt's efforts to dissuade her--and not merely to go herself but to take her nephew with her.

  • Whether it were difficult or easy, possible or impossible, she did not ask and did not want to know: it was her duty, not only to herself, to be near her brother who was perhaps dying, but to do everything possible to take his son to him, and so she prepared to set off.

  • That she had not heard from Prince Andrew himself, Princess Mary attributed to his being too weak to write or to his considering the long journey too hard and too dangerous for her and his son.

  • Her equipages were the huge family coach in which she had traveled to Voronezh, a semiopen trap, and a baggage cart.

  • With her traveled Mademoiselle Bourienne, little Nicholas and his tutor, her old nurse, three maids, Tikhon, and a young footman and courier her aunt had sent to accompany her.

  • During this difficult journey Mademoiselle Bourienne, Dessalles, and Princess Mary's servants were astonished at her energy and firmness of spirit.

  • Thanks to her activity and energy, which infected her fellow travelers, they approached Yaroslavl by the end of the second week.

  • Her love for Rostov no longer tormented or agitated her.

  • It filled her whole soul, had become an integral part of herself, and she no longer struggled against it.

  • She had become convinced of it at her last interview with Nicholas, when he had come to tell her that her brother was with the Rostovs.

  • She knew that she loved for the first and only time in her life and felt that she was beloved, and was happy in regard to it.

  • That feeling was so strong at the moment of leaving Voronezh that those who saw her off, as they looked at her careworn, despairing face, felt sure she would fall ill on the journey.

  • But the very difficulties and preoccupations of the journey, which she took so actively in hand, saved her for a while from her grief and gave her strength.

  • Princess Mary looked at him with frightened inquiry, not understanding why he did not reply to what she chiefly wanted to know: how was her brother?

  • What "still the same" might mean Princess Mary did not ask, but with an unnoticed glance at little seven-year-old Nicholas, who was sitting in front of her looking with pleasure at the town, she bowed her head and did not raise it again till the heavy coach, rumbling, shaking and swaying, came to a stop.

  • Despite her excitement, Princess Mary realized that this was the countess and that it was necessary to say something to her.

  • "The doctor says that he is not in danger," said the countess, but as she spoke she raised her eyes with a sigh, and her gesture conveyed a contradiction of her words.

  • In spite of her one desire to see her brother as soon as possible, and her vexation that at the moment when all she wanted was to see him they should be trying to entertain her and pretending to admire her nephew, the princess noticed all that was going on around her and felt the necessity of submitting, for a time, to this new order of things which she had entered.

  • She knew it to be necessary, and though it was hard for her she was not vexed with these people.

  • "This is my niece," said the count, introducing Sonya--"You don't know her, Princess?"

  • But she felt oppressed by the fact that the mood of everyone around her was so far from what was in her own heart.

  • She ran to meet her, embraced her, and began to cry on her shoulder.

  • As soon as Natasha, sitting at the head of Prince Andrew's bed, heard of Princess Mary's arrival, she softly left his room and hastened to her with those swift steps that had sounded buoyant to Princess Mary.

  • There was only one expression on her agitated face when she ran into the drawing room--that of love--boundless love for him, for her, and for all that was near to the man she loved; and of pity, suffering for others, and passionate desire to give herself entirely to helping them.

  • It was plain that at that moment there was in Natasha's heart no thought of herself or of her own relations with Prince Andrew.

  • "Come, come to him, Mary," said Natasha, leading her into the other room.

  • Princess Mary raised her head, dried her eyes, and turned to Natasha.

  • She felt that from her she would be able to understand and learn everything.

  • "How..." she began her question but stopped short.

  • Natasha's face and eyes would have to tell her all more clearly and profoundly.

  • Natasha was gazing at her, but seemed afraid and in doubt whether to say all she knew or not; she seemed to feel that before those luminous eyes which penetrated into the very depths of her heart, it was impossible not to tell the whole truth which she saw.

  • "But two days ago this suddenly happened," said Natasha, struggling with her sobs.

  • When Natasha opened Prince Andrew's door with a familiar movement and let Princess Mary pass into the room before her, the princess felt the sobs in her throat.

  • She was sure he would speak soft, tender words to her such as her father had uttered before his death, and that she would not be able to bear it and would burst into sobs in his presence.

  • On seeing his face and meeting his eyes Princess Mary's pace suddenly slackened, she felt her tears dry up and her sobs ceased.

  • He kissed his sister, holding her hand in his as was their wont.

  • He, the sensitive, tender Prince Andrew, how could he say that, before her whom he loved and who loved him?

  • If he had not known that he was dying, how could he have failed to pity her and how could he speak like that in her presence?

  • Prince Andrew did not notice that she called his sister Mary, and only after calling her so in his presence did Natasha notice it herself.

  • Princess Mary heard his words but they had no meaning for her, except as a proof of how far away he now was from everything living.

  • Natasha, who felt her glance, did not look at her.

  • He looked at her attentively.

  • Princess Mary nodded her head, weeping.

  • "Nothing. You mustn't cry here," he said, looking at her with the same cold expression.

  • Since she had begun looking after him, he had always experienced this physical consciousness of her nearness.

  • The needles clicked lightly in her slender, rapidly moving hands, and he could clearly see the thoughtful profile of her drooping face.

  • She moved, and the ball rolled off her knees.

  • He looked at her without moving and saw that she wanted to draw a deep breath after stooping, but refrained from doing so and breathed cautiously.

  • At the Troitsa monastery they had spoken of the past, and he had told her that if he lived he would always thank God for his wound which had brought them together again, but after that they never spoke of the future.

  • "Can it or can it not be?" he now thought as he looked at her and listened to the light click of the steel needles.

  • I love her more than anything in the world!

  • Her face shone with rapturous joy.

  • "How good it would be!" and taking her hand he kissed it.

  • "But you have not slept," she said, repressing her joy.

  • He pressed her hand and released it, and she went back to the candle and sat down again in her former position.

  • Twice she turned and looked at him, and her eyes met his beaming at her.

  • She set herself a task on her stocking and resolved not to turn round till it was finished.

  • He did not answer and looked at her strangely, not understanding.

  • She closed them but did not kiss them, but clung to that which reminded her most nearly of him--his body.

  • She went through the accounts with Alpatych, conferred with Dessalles about her nephew, and gave orders and made preparations for the journey to Moscow.

  • Natasha remained alone and, from the time Princess Mary began making preparations for departure, held aloof from her too.

  • Princess Mary asked the countess to let Natasha go with her to Moscow, and both parents gladly accepted this offer, for they saw their daughter losing strength every day and thought that a change of scene and the advice of Moscow doctors would be good for her.

  • After she felt herself deserted by Princes Mary and alone in her grief, Natasha spent most of the time in her room by herself, sitting huddled up feet and all in the corner of the sofa, tearing and twisting something with her slender nervous fingers and gazing intently and fixedly at whatever her eyes chanced to fall on.

  • As soon as anyone entered she got up quickly, changed her position and expression, and picked up a book or some sewing, evidently waiting impatiently for the intruder to go.

  • She felt all the time as if she might at any moment penetrate that on which--with a terrible questioning too great for her strength--her spiritual gaze was fixed.

  • And that other side of life, of which she had never before thought and which had formerly seemed to her so far away and improbable, was now nearer and more akin and more comprehensible than this side of life, where everything was either emptiness and desolation or suffering and indignity.

  • She saw his face, heard his voice, repeated his words and her own, and sometimes devised other words they might have spoken.

  • He noticed her watching him, raised his eyes, and began to speak seriously:

  • And now he again seemed to be saying the same words to her, only in her imagination Natasha this time gave him a different answer.

  • You know that for me there is nothing in life but you, and to suffer with you is the greatest happiness for me, and he took her hand and pressed it as he had pressed it that terrible evening four days before his death.

  • I love, love... she said, convulsively pressing her hands and setting her teeth with a desperate effort...

  • She was overcome by sweet sorrow and tears were already rising in her eyes; then she suddenly asked herself to whom she was saying this.

  • And now, now it seemed to her she was penetrating the mystery....

  • But at the instant when it seemed that the incomprehensible was revealing itself to her a loud rattle of the door handle struck painfully on her ears.

  • Dunyasha, her maid, entered the room quickly and abruptly with a frightened look on her face and showing no concern for her mistress.

  • Besides a feeling of aloofness from everybody Natasha was feeling a special estrangement from the members of her own family.

  • As she entered the ballroom her father was hurriedly coming out of her mother's room.

  • Terrible anguish struck her heart, she felt a dreadful ache as if something was being torn inside her and she were dying.

  • The sight of her father, the terribly wild cries of her mother that she heard through the door, made her immediately forget herself and her own grief.

  • She ran to her father, but he feebly waved his arm, pointing to her mother's door.

  • She went in with rapid steps, pausing at the door for an instant as if struggling with herself, and then ran to her mother.

  • Sonya and the maids were holding her arms.

  • Natasha! she shrieked, pushing those around her away.

  • She did not let go of her mother but struggled tenderly with her, demanded a pillow and hot water, and unfastened and tore open her mother's dress.

  • Mummy, my precious!... she whispered incessantly, kissing her head, her hands, her face, and feeling her own irrepressible and streaming tears tickling her nose and cheeks.

  • The countess pressed her daughter's hand, closed her eyes, and became quiet for a moment.

  • Suddenly she sat up with unaccustomed swiftness, glanced vacantly around her, and seeing Natasha began to press her daughter's head with all her strength.

  • Then she turned toward her daughter's face which was wincing with pain and gazed long at it.

  • Natasha looked at her with eyes full of tears and in her look there was nothing but love and an entreaty for forgiveness.

  • "My darling Mummy!" she repeated, straining all the power of her love to find some way of taking on herself the excess of grief that crushed her mother.

  • She did not sleep and did not leave her mother.

  • Her persevering and patient love seemed completely to surround the countess every moment, not explaining or consoling, but recalling her to life.

  • Her persevering and patient love seemed completely to surround the countess every moment, not explaining or consoling, but recalling her to life.

  • During the third night the countess kept very quiet for a few minutes, and Natasha rested her head on the arm of her chair and closed her eyes, but opened them again on hearing the bedstead creak.

  • "You have improved in looks and grown more manly," continued the countess, taking her daughter's hand.

  • And embracing her daughter, the countess began to weep for the first time.

  • Princess Mary postponed her departure.

  • They saw that she alone was able to restrain her mother from unreasoning despair.

  • Petya's death had torn from her half her life.

  • She thought her life was ended, but her love for her mother unexpectedly showed her that the essence of life--love--was still active within her.

  • Princess Mary put off her departure, and for three weeks looked after Natasha as if she had been a sick child.

  • The last weeks passed in her mother's bedroom had strained Natasha's physical strength.

  • One afternoon noticing Natasha shivering with fever, Princess Mary took her to her own room and made her lie down on the bed.

  • Natasha lay down, but when Princess Mary had drawn the blinds and was going away she called her back.

  • What is in her heart?

  • What is her mind like?

  • And Natasha, embracing her, began kissing her face and hands, making Princess Mary feel shy but happy by this demonstration of her feelings.

  • She did not think of applying submission and self-abnegation to her own life, for she was accustomed to seek other joys, but she understood and loved in another those previously incomprehensible virtues.

  • Natasha had grown thin and pale and physically so weak that they all talked about her health, and this pleased her.

  • It seemed to her that things must be so, and yet it was dreadfully sad.

  • Unconsciously she immediately invented a reason for going down, and then, testing her strength, ran upstairs again, observing the result.

  • She did not know and would not have believed it, but beneath the layer of slime that covered her soul and seemed to her impenetrable, delicate young shoots of grass were already sprouting, which taking root would so cover with their living verdure the grief that weighed her down that it would soon no longer be seen or noticed.

  • At the end of January Princess Mary left for Moscow, and the count insisted on Natasha's going with her to consult the doctors.

  • Pierre did not in any way seek her approval, he merely studied her with interest.

  • The most cunning man could not have crept into her confidence more successfully, evoking memories of the best times of her youth and showing sympathy with them.

  • A few minutes later the footman returned with Dessalles, who brought word from the princess that she would be very glad to see Pierre if he would excuse her want of ceremony and come upstairs to her apartment.

  • In a rather low room lit by one candle sat the princess and with her another person dressed in black.

  • "This must be one of her companions," he thought, glancing at the lady in the black dress.

  • The princess rose quickly to meet him and held out her hand.

  • "Yes," she said, looking at his altered face after he had kissed her hand, "so this is how we meet again.

  • He spoke of you even at the very last, she went on, turning her eyes from Pierre to her companion with a shyness that surprised him for an instant.

  • Again the princess glanced round at her companion with even more uneasiness in her manner and was about to add something, but Pierre interrupted her.

  • He glanced once at the companion's face, saw her attentive and kindly gaze fixed on him, and, as often happens when one is talking, felt somehow that this companion in the black dress was a good, kind, excellent creature who would not hinder his conversing freely with Princess Mary.

  • But the more he tried to hide it the more clearly--clearer than any words could have done--did he betray to himself, to her, and to Princess Mary that he loved her.

  • Pierre had failed to notice Natasha because he did not at all expect to see her there, but he had failed to recognize her because the change in her since he last saw her was immense.

  • Pierre's confusion was not reflected by any confusion on Natasha's part, but only by the pleasure that just perceptibly lit up her whole face.

  • They insisted on her coming with me.

  • Natasha looked at him, and by way of answer to his words her eyes widened and lit up.

  • Natasha had already opened her mouth to speak but suddenly stopped.

  • Pierre hurriedly turned away from her and again addressed Princess Mary, asking about his friend's last days.

  • He did not purposely say things to please her, but whatever he was saying he regarded from her standpoint.

  • But Pierre's face quivering with emotion, his questions and his eager restless expression, gradually compelled her to go into details which she feared to recall for her own sake.

  • Pierre kept saying as he leaned toward her with his whole body and eagerly listened to her story.

  • What a happy thing that he saw you again, he added, suddenly turning to Natasha and looking at her with eyes full of tears.

  • She frowned and lowered her eyes for a moment.

  • "Yes, that was happiness," she then said in her quiet voice with its deep chest notes.

  • She blushed, pressed her clasped hands on her knees, and then controlling herself with an evident effort lifted her head and began to speak rapidly.

  • Pierre listened to her with lips parted and eyes fixed upon her full of tears.

  • He listened to her and felt only pity for her, for what she was suffering now while she was speaking.

  • Princess Mary, frowning in her effort to hold back her tears, sat beside Natasha, and heard for the first time the story of those last days of her brother's and Natasha's love.

  • She spoke, mingling most trifling details with the intimate secrets of her soul, and it seemed as if she could never finish.

  • She got up quickly just as Nicholas entered, almost ran to the door which was hidden by curtains, struck her head against it, and rushed from the room with a moan either of pain or sorrow.

  • Princess Mary roused him from his abstraction by drawing his attention to her nephew who had entered the room.

  • Natasha was calm, though a severe and grave expression had again settled on her face.

  • Mary Abramovna invited me to her house and kept telling me what had happened, or ought to have happened, to me.

  • "Tell me, you did not know of the countess' death when you decided to remain in Moscow?" asked Princess Mary and immediately blushed, noticing that her question, following his mention of freedom, ascribed to his words a meaning he had perhaps not intended.

  • We were not an exemplary couple," he added quickly, glancing at Natasha and noticing on her face curiosity as to how he would speak of his wife, "but her death shocked me terribly.

  • When he ventured to glance her way again her face was cold, stern, and he fancied even contemptuous.

  • By this time he had risen from the table and was pacing the room, Natasha following him with her eyes.

  • She caught the unfinished word in its flight and took it straight into her open heart, divining the secret meaning of all Pierre's mental travail.

  • Princess Mary understood his story and sympathized with him, but she now saw something else that absorbed all her attention.

  • She saw the possibility of love and happiness between Natasha and Pierre, and the first thought of this filled her heart with gladness.

  • Pierre in shamefaced and happy confusion glanced occasionally at her, and tried to think what to say next to introduce a fresh subject.

  • Suddenly Natasha bent her head, covered her face with her hands, and began to cry.

  • She smiled at Pierre through her tears.

  • Princess Mary did not express her opinion of Pierre nor did Natasha speak of him.

  • And the same mischievous smile lingered for a long time on her face as if it had been forgotten there.

  • He was thinking of Prince Andrew, of Natasha, and of their love, at one moment jealous of her past, then reproaching himself for that feeling.

  • "Do you know her?" asked Pierre.

  • I heard that they were arranging a match for her with young Rostov.

  • Better not say anything to her either.

  • But he had hardly entered the room before he felt her presence with his whole being by the loss of his sense of freedom.

  • She was as he had known her almost as a child and later on as Prince Andrew's fiancee.

  • Natasha gave him her hand and went out.

  • "Yes, I wanted to tell you," said he, answering her look as if she had spoken.

  • I know I am not worthy of her, I know it's impossible to speak of it now.

  • I don't know when I began to love her, but I have loved her and her alone all my life, and I love her so that I cannot imagine life without her.

  • I cannot propose to her at present, but the thought that perhaps she might someday be my wife and that I may be missing that possibility... that possibility... is terrible.

  • Tell me what I am to do, dear princess! he added after a pause, and touched her hand as she did not reply.

  • You are right that to speak to her of love at present...

  • "To speak to her now wouldn't do," said the princess all the same.

  • Before her words were out, Pierre had sprung up and with a frightened expression seized Princess Mary's hand.

  • Write to her parents, and leave it to me.

  • I will tell her when I can.

  • When on saying good-by he took her thin, slender hand, he could not help holding it a little longer in his own.

  • When dealing with the affairs and papers of his dead wife, her memory aroused in him no feeling but pity that she had not known the bliss he now knew.

  • Everything: her face, walk, look, and voice, was suddenly altered.

  • To her own surprise a power of life and hope of happiness rose to the surface and demanded satisfaction.

  • She no longer complained of her position, did not say a word about the past, and no longer feared to make happy plans for the future.

  • She spoke little of Pierre, but when Princess Mary mentioned him a long-extinguished light once more kindled in her eyes and her lips curved with a strange smile.

  • But when she was with Natasha she was not vexed with her and did not reproach her.

  • The reawakened power of life that had seized Natasha was so evidently irrepressible and unexpected by her that in her presence Princess Mary felt that she had no right to reproach her even in her heart.

  • When Princess Mary returned to her room after her nocturnal talk with Pierre, Natasha met her on the threshold.

  • She remembered her brother and his love.

  • Natasha suddenly asked, and hastily replied to her own question.

  • Every time she gave him his medicine he sobbed and silently kissed her hand.

  • On his last day, sobbing, he asked her and his absent son to forgive him for having dissipated their property--that being the chief fault of which he was conscious.

  • He seemed in his heart to reproach her for being too perfect, and because there was nothing to reproach her with.

  • He felt that the more he valued her the less he loved her.

  • "I never expected anything else of him," said Princess Mary to herself, feeling a joyous sense of her love for him.

  • Remembering her friendly relations with all the Rostovs which had made her almost a member of the family, she thought it her duty to go to see them.

  • But remembering her relations with Nicholas in Voronezh she was shy about doing so.

  • Making a great effort she did however go to call on them a few weeks after her arrival in Moscow.

  • Nicholas was the first to meet her, as the countess' room could only be reached through his.

  • But instead of being greeted with pleasure as she had expected, at his first glance at her his face assumed a cold, stiff, proud expression she had not seen on it before.

  • He inquired about her health, led the way to his mother, and having sat there for five minutes left the room.

  • When the princess came out of the countess' room Nicholas met her again, and with marked solemnity and stiffness accompanied her to the anteroom.

  • To her remarks about his mother's health he made no reply.

  • "Oh, Nicholas, how can you talk like that?" cried Sonya, hardly able to conceal her delight.

  • But after her visit the old countess spoke of her several times a day.

  • She is a very admirable young woman and you always liked her, but now suddenly you have got some notion or other in your head.

  • "I expected nothing else," she told herself, calling her pride to her aid.

  • But she could not pacify herself with these reflections; a feeling akin to remorse troubled her when she thought of her visit.

  • And when she asked herself what distressed her, she had to admit that it was her relation to Rostov.

  • One day in midwinter when sitting in the schoolroom attending to her nephew's lessons, she was informed that Rostov had called.

  • Her first glance at Nicholas' face told her that he had only come to fulfill the demands of politeness, and she firmly resolved to maintain the tone in which he addressed her.

  • Her first glance at Nicholas' face told her that he had only come to fulfill the demands of politeness, and she firmly resolved to maintain the tone in which he addressed her.

  • With Mademoiselle Bourienne's help the princess had maintained the conversation very well, but at the very last moment, just when he rose, she was so tired of talking of what did not interest her, and her mind was so full of the question why she alone was granted so little happiness in life, that in a fit of absent-mindedness she sat still, her luminous eyes gazing fixedly before her, not noticing that he had risen.

  • Nicholas glanced at her and, wishing to appear not to notice her abstraction, made some remark to Mademoiselle Bourienne and then again looked at the princess.

  • She still sat motionless with a look of suffering on her gentle face.

  • He suddenly felt sorry for her and was vaguely conscious that he might be the cause of the sadness her face expressed.

  • He wished to help her and say something pleasant, but could think of nothing to say.

  • Princess Mary gazed intently into his eyes with her own luminous ones as he said this.

  • "I cannot accept your praise," he interrupted her hurriedly.

  • "I had come so near to you... and to all your family that I thought you would not consider my sympathy misplaced, but I was mistaken," and suddenly her voice trembled.

  • There were tears in her eyes and in her voice.

  • Countess Mary was jealous of this passion of her husband's and regretted that she could not share it; but she could not understand the joys and vexations he derived from that world, to her so remote and alien.

  • Countess Mary turned red and then pale, but continued to sit with head bowed and lips compressed and gave her husband no reply.

  • Countess Mary raised her head and tried to speak, but hastily looked down again and her lips puckered.

  • She never cried from pain or vexation, but always from sorrow or pity, and when she wept her radiant eyes acquired an irresistible charm.

  • The moment Nicholas took her hand she could no longer restrain herself and began to cry.

  • Nicholas! and she covered her face with her hands.

  • He flushed crimson, left her side, and paced up and down the room.

  • He understood what she was weeping about, but could not in his heart at once agree with her that what he had regarded from childhood as quite an everyday event was wrong.

  • "Mary," he said softly, going up to her, "it will never happen again; I give you my word.

  • "You should go, go away at once, if you don't feel strong enough to control yourself," she would reply sadly, trying to comfort her husband.

  • She could not find fault with Sonya in any way and tried to be fond of her, but often felt ill-will toward her which she could not overcome.

  • Once she had a talk with her friend Natasha about Sonya and about her own injustice toward her.

  • Perhaps she lacks egotism, I don't know, but from her is taken away, and everything has been taken away.

  • It really seemed that Sonya did not feel her position trying, and had grown quite reconciled to her lot as a sterile flower.

  • She waited on the old countess, petted and spoiled the children, was always ready to render the small services for which she had a gift, and all this was unconsciously accepted from her with insufficient gratitude.

  • Natasha had been staying at her brother's with her husband and children since early autumn.

  • At that table were his mother, his mother's old lady companion Belova, his wife, their three children with their governess and tutor, his wife's nephew with his tutor, Sonya, Denisov, Natasha, her three children, their governess, and old Michael Ivanovich, the late prince's architect, who was living on in retirement at Bald Hills.

  • When her husband took his place she concluded, from the rapid manner in which after taking up his table napkin he pushed back the tumbler and wineglass standing before him, that he was out of humor, as was sometimes the case when he came in to dinner straight from the farm--especially before the soup.

  • But today she quite forgot that and was hurt that he should be angry with her without any reason, and she felt unhappy.

  • Her unnatural tone made him wince unpleasantly and he replied hastily.

  • She concluded from his tone that he was vexed with her and wished to end the conversation.

  • She knew her remarks sounded unnatural, but could not refrain from asking some more questions.

  • Thanks to Denisov the conversation at table soon became general and lively, and she did not talk to her husband.

  • When they left the table and went as usual to thank the old countess, Countess Mary held out her hand and kissed her husband, and asked him why he was angry with her.

  • She looked down at her expanded figure and in the glass at her pale, sallow, emaciated face in which her eyes now looked larger than ever.

  • And everything annoyed her--Denisov's shouting and laughter, Natasha's talk, and especially a quick glance Sonya gave her.

  • Having sat awhile with her visitors without understanding anything of what they were saying, she softly left the room and went to the nursery.

  • The children were playing at "going to Moscow" in a carriage made of chairs and invited her to go with them.

  • She sat down and played with them a little, but the thought of her husband and his unreasonable crossness worried her.

  • Little Andrew, her eldest boy, imitating his mother, followed her on tiptoe.

  • "Mary, dear, I think he is asleep--he was so tired," said Sonya, meeting her in the large sitting room (it seemed to Countess Mary that she crossed her path everywhere).

  • Countess Mary looked round, saw little Andrew following her, felt that Sonya was right, and for that very reason flushed and with evident difficulty refrained from saying something harsh.

  • She made no reply, but to avoid obeying Sonya beckoned to Andrew to follow her quietly and went to the door.

  • As she listened to it she saw before her his smooth handsome forehead, his mustache, and his whole face, as she had so often seen it in the stillness of the night when he slept.

  • Five minutes later little black-eyed three-year-old Natasha, her father's pet, having learned from her brother that Papa was asleep and Mamma was in the sitting room, ran to her father unobserved by her mother.

  • She went in and sat down by her husband.

  • I don't love her, but...

  • A thought had occurred to him and so it belonged to her also.

  • And he told her of his intention to persuade Pierre to stay with them till spring.

  • Countess Mary listened till he had finished, made some remark, and in her turn began thinking aloud.

  • Her thoughts were about the children.

  • "You can see the woman in her already," she said in French, pointing to little Natasha.

  • And Nicholas, taking his little daughter in his strong hand, lifted her high, placed her on his shoulder, held her by the legs, and paced the room with her.

  • In her absence Nicholas allowed himself to give his little daughter a gallop round the room.

  • Out of breath, he took the laughing child quickly from his shoulder and pressed her to his heart.

  • You should have seen her ecstasy, and how he caught it for having stayed away so long.

  • It's time you two were parted, she added, looking smilingly at the little girl who clung to her father.

  • Her features were more defined and had a calm, soft, and serene expression.

  • In her face there was none of the ever-glowing animation that had formerly burned there and constituted its charm.

  • Now her face and body were often all that one saw, and her soul was not visible at all.

  • The old fire very rarely kindled in her face now.

  • That happened only when, as was the case that day, her husband returned home, or a sick child was convalescent, or when she and Countess Mary spoke of Prince Andrew (she never mentioned him to her husband, who she imagined was jealous of Prince Andrew's memory), or on the rare occasions when something happened to induce her to sing, a practice she had quite abandoned since her marriage.

  • At the rare moments when the old fire did kindle in her handsome, fully developed body she was even more attractive than in former days.

  • Since their marriage Natasha and her husband had lived in Moscow, in Petersburg, on their estate near Moscow, or with her mother, that is to say, in Nicholas' house.

  • All who had known Natasha before her marriage wondered at the change in her as at something extraordinary.

  • "Only she lets her love of her husband and children overflow all bounds," said the countess, "so that it even becomes absurd."

  • She took no pains with her manners or with delicacy of speech, or with her toilet, or to show herself to her husband in her most becoming attitudes, or to avoid inconveniencing him by being too exacting.

  • She felt that the allurements instinct had formerly taught her to use would now be merely ridiculous in the eyes of her husband, to whom she had from the first moment given herself up entirely--that is, with her whole soul, leaving no corner of it hidden from him.

  • The chief reason for devoting no time either to singing, to dress, or to choosing her words was that she really had no time to spare for these things.

  • The subject which wholly engrossed Natasha's attention was her family: that is, her husband whom she had to keep so that he should belong entirely to her and to the home, and the children whom she had to bear, bring into the world, nurse, and bring up.

  • A husband was given her and he gave her a family.

  • And she not only saw no need of any other or better husband, but as all the powers of her soul were intent on serving that husband and family, she could not imagine and saw no interest in imagining how it would be if things were different.

  • Natasha did not care for society in general, but prized the more the society of her relatives--Countess Mary, and her brother, her mother, and Sonya.

  • From the very first days of their married life Natasha had announced her demands.

  • Pierre was greatly surprised by his wife's view, to him a perfectly novel one, that every moment of his life belonged to her and to the family.

  • At home Natasha placed herself in the position of a slave to her husband, and the whole household went on tiptoe when he was occupied--that is, was reading or writing in his study.

  • Thus in a time of trouble ever memorable to him after the birth of their first child who was delicate, when they had to change the wet nurse three times and Natasha fell ill from despair, Pierre one day told her of Rousseau's view, with which he quite agreed, that to have a wet nurse is unnatural and harmful.

  • On reading that letter (she always read her husband's letters) Natasha herself suggested that he should go to Petersburg, though she would feel his absence very acutely.

  • Natasha was sad and irritable all that time, especially when her mother, her brother, Sonya, or Countess Mary in their efforts to console her tried to excuse Pierre and suggested reasons for his delay in returning.

  • And she would go to the nursery to nurse Petya, her only boy.

  • While attending to him she bore the anxiety about her husband more easily.

  • She was nursing her boy when the sound of Pierre's sleigh was heard at the front door, and the old nurse--knowing how to please her mistress-- entered the room inaudibly but hurriedly and with a beaming face.

  • The blood rushed to Natasha's face and her feet involuntarily moved, but she could not jump up and run out.

  • Cautiously withdrawing her breast, Natasha rocked him a little, handed him to the nurse, and went with rapid steps toward the door.

  • But at the door she stopped as if her conscience reproached her for having in her joy left the child too soon, and she glanced round.

  • Don't worry, go! she whispered, smiling, with the kind of familiarity that grows up between a nurse and her mistress.

  • A flood of brilliant, joyful light poured from her transfigured face.

  • The storm was long since over and there was bright, joyous sunshine on Natasha's face as she gazed tenderly at her husband and child.

  • "Now, Nicholas," she added, turning to her husband, "I can't understand how it is you don't see the charm of these delicious marvels."

  • From broken remarks about Natasha and his father, from the emotion with which Pierre spoke of that dead father, and from the careful, reverent tenderness with which Natasha spoke of him, the boy, who was only just beginning to guess what love is, derived the notion that his father had loved Natasha and when dying had left her to his friend.

  • Natasha, who was sitting opposite to him with her eldest daughter on her lap, turned her sparkling eyes swiftly from her husband to the things he showed her.

  • Pierre told her the price.

  • The countess was sitting with her companion Belova, playing grand- patience as usual, when Pierre and Natasha came into the drawing room with parcels under their arms.

  • The countess was now over sixty, was quite gray, and wore a cap with a frill that surrounded her face.

  • Her face had shriveled, her upper lip had sunk in, and her eyes were dim.

  • Her face had shriveled, her upper lip had sunk in, and her eyes were dim.

  • After the deaths of her son and husband in such rapid succession, she felt herself a being accidentally forgotten in this world and left without aim or object for her existence.

  • Life gave her no new impressions.

  • But until death came she had to go on living, that is, to use her vital forces.

  • Her life had no external aims--only a need to exercise her various functions and inclinations was apparent.

  • Her life had no external aims--only a need to exercise her various functions and inclinations was apparent.

  • She had to eat, sleep, think, speak, weep, work, give vent to her anger, and so on, merely because she had a stomach, a brain, muscles, nerves, and a liver.

  • She talked only because she physically needed to exercise her tongue and lungs.

  • She cried as a child does, because her nose had to be cleared, and so on.

  • She would begin to say something to her in a low tone from the other end of the room.

  • Another pretext would be her snuff, which would seem too dry or too damp or not rubbed fine enough.

  • After these fits of irritability her face would grow yellow, and her maids knew by infallible symptoms when Belova would again be deaf, the snuff damp, and the countess' face yellow.

  • Just as she needed to work off her spleen so she had sometimes to exercise her still-existing faculty of thinking--and the pretext for that was a game of patience.

  • When her vocal organs needed exercise, which was usually toward seven o'clock when she had had an after-dinner rest in a darkened room, the pretext would be the retelling of the same stories over and over again to the same audience.

  • The old lady's condition was understood by the whole household though no one ever spoke of it, and they all made every possible effort to satisfy her needs.

  • But those glances expressed something more: they said that she had played her part in life, that what they now saw was not her whole self, that we must all become like her, and that they were glad to yield to her, to restrain themselves for this once precious being formerly as full of life as themselves, but now so much to be pitied.

  • When Pierre and his wife entered the drawing room the countess was in one of her customary states in which she needed the mental exertion of playing patience, and so--though by force of habit she greeted him with the words she always used when Pierre or her son returned after an absence: High time, my dear, high time!

  • She finished her game of patience and only then examined the presents.

  • The countess had long wished for such a box, but as she did not want to cry just then she glanced indifferently at the portrait and gave her attention chiefly to the box for cards.

  • Doesn't see anything, doesn't remember anything, she went on, repeating her usual phrases.

  • "Look, Anna Timofeevna," she added to her companion, "see what a box for cards my son has brought us!"

  • Belova admired the presents and was delighted with her dress material.

  • "What is that, mon cher ami?" asked the countess, who had finished her tea and evidently needed a pretext for being angry after her meal.

  • Well, and what harm is there in that? and she rose (everybody else got up too) and with a severe expression sailed back to her table in the sitting room.

  • "It means that Anna Makarovna has finished her stocking," said Countess Mary.

  • Countess Mary sat down doing woolwork; Natasha did not take her eyes off her husband.

  • Natasha, who had long expected to be fetched to nurse her baby, now heard the nurse calling her and went to the nursery.

  • Natasha, who had come in during the conversation, looked joyfully at her husband.

  • Natasha was the first to speak, defending her husband and attacking her brother.

  • Her defense was weak and inapt but she attained her object.

  • Her defense was weak and inapt but she attained her object.

  • She was afraid that what she was writing would not be understood or approved by her husband.

  • "A diary, Nicholas," she replied, handing him a blue exercise book filled with her firm, bold writing.

  • He was proud of her intelligence and goodness, recognized his own insignificance beside her in the spiritual world, and rejoiced all the more that she with such a soul not only belonged to him but was part of himself.

  • All that the fondest mother could do for her son you have done and are doing for him, and of course I am glad of it.

  • Countess Mary listened to her husband and understood all that he told her.

  • But she had to force herself to attend, for what he was saying did not interest her at all.

  • Besides this feeling which absorbed her altogether and hindered her from following the details of her husband's plans, thoughts that had no connection with what he was saying flitted through her mind.

  • She thought of her nephew.

  • She did not compare them with him, but compared her feeling for them with her feeling for him, and felt with regret that there was something lacking in her feeling for young Nicholas.

  • A stern expression of the lofty, secret suffering of a soul burdened by the body appeared on her face.

  • What will become of us if she dies, as I always fear when her face is like that? thought he, and placing himself before the icon he began to say his evening prayers.

  • Natasha was so used to this kind of talk with her husband that for her it was the surest sign of something being wrong between them if Pierre followed a line of logical reasoning.

  • Natasha spoke to Pierre about her brother's life and doings, of how she had suffered and lacked life during his own absence, and of how she was fonder than ever of Mary, and how Mary was in every way better than herself.

  • In saying this Natasha was sincere in acknowledging Mary's superiority, but at the same time by saying it she made a demand on Pierre that he should, all the same, prefer her to Mary and to all other women, and that now, especially after having seen many women in Petersburg, he should tell her so afresh.

  • Natasha cried, and her eyes glittered coldly and vindictively.

  • "Did you see her?" she added, after a pause.

  • (She meant her little son.)

  • A sinking man who clutches at another and drowns him; or a hungry mother exhausted by feeding her baby, who steals some food; or a man trained to discipline who on duty at the word of command kills a defenseless man-- seem less guilty, that is, less free and more subject to the law of necessity, to one who knows the circumstances in which these people were placed, and more free to one who does not know that the man was himself drowning, that the mother was hungry, that the soldier was in the ranks, and so on.

  • So far her prayers had been unanswered.

  • She smiled to herself - and not always because he rubbed her the wrong way.

  • At some point, that stopped bugging her and became an attraction.

  • In addition to the assistance from the renters, the money finally gave her an income of her own, and the token independence that went with it.

  • Leaving her thoughts behind, she started up the hill to meet Alex.

  • His searching gaze ran over her face again.

  • Alex was doing everything in his power to provide her with all the experiences of a natural mother.

  • Staring out the bay window at the old house, she abandoned her coffee cup on the window sill.

  • Still, she said, returning her attention to the old house.

  • In fact, he had given her strict orders not to lift anything.

  • "Hello!" he said, seeing her, "are you Dorothy Gale?"

  • Far below her she found six great glowing balls suspended in the air.

  • But he paid no attention to her warning.

  • The man with the star regarded her with his calm, expressionless eyes.

  • He turned and walked down the street, and after a moment's hesitation Dorothy caught Eureka in her arms and climbed into the buggy.

  • The boy took his seat beside her and said: "Gid-dap Jim."

  • Her poise expressed both dignity and grace.

  • Then all the people bowed low to her, and the Prince turned and walked away alone.

  • "Don't be rough!" he would call out, if Eureka knocked over one of the round, fat piglets with her paw; but the pigs never minded, and enjoyed the sport very greatly.

  • "Come here," said the little man, and took her to one of the corners of the building.

  • Eureka clung with her claws to the wooden side of the house and let herself down easily.

  • They mounted into the buggy, Dorothy holding Eureka safe in her lap.

  • "Tell us, dear, what do the creatures look like?" she asked, addressing her pet.

  • Mother's about two thousand years old; but she carelessly lost track of her age a few centuries ago and skipped several hundreds.

  • She's a little fussy, you know, and afraid of growing old, being a widow and still in her prime.

  • Oh, she is sometimes gone for several weeks on her hunting trips, and if we were not tied we would crawl all over the mountain and fight with each other and get into a lot of mischief.

  • Yes; a wicked witch enchanted her, so she could not rule her kingdom.

  • She had scarcely spoken the words then she suddenly disappeared from the cave, and with her went the kitten.

  • But Dorothy sprang up and ran to seize her friend's hand drawing him impulsively toward the lovely Princess, who smiled most graciously upon her guest.

  • Just then Dorothy, who had risen early and heard the voices of the animals, ran out to greet her old friends.

  • This made Zeb laugh, in turn, and the boy felt comforted to find that Ozma laughed as merrily at her weeping subject as she had at him.

  • Dorothy carried her in her arms back to where the others sat in grieved and thoughtful silence.

  • Gilbert looked up from his play and saw that his mother was very deeply interested in her book.

  • He says she was a monster; and she was running straight toward the hills with a little lamb in her mouth.

  • She creates premium services on her site that cost just .95 a year that include a number of additional features and virtual goods.

  • Where everyone can live up to his or her maximum potential.

  • In 1796, he extracted fluid from the pox on the hand of a dairymaid named Sarah Nelmes—who had caught the condition from her cow Blossom—and injected the fluid into a cut in eight-year-old James Phipps's arm.

  • No student of history would argue this point, regardless of his or her politics.

  • The woman paints the child's experiences in her own fantasy.

  • At present our houses are cluttered and defiled with it, and a good housewife would sweep out the greater part into the dust hole, and not leave her morning's work undone.

  • In her own words, they were "good boards overhead, good boards all around, and a good window"--of two whole squares originally, only the cat had passed out that way lately.

  • With these words she greeted Prince Vasili Kuragin, a man of high rank and importance, who was the first to arrive at her reception.

  • She suddenly paused, smiling at her own impetuosity.

  • When she had done so Princess Mary looked inquiringly at her father.

  • "What are you staring at?" he shouted to the cook, who in her red skirt, with sleeves rolled up, swinging her bare elbows, had stepped to the corner to listen to what was being said.

  • Clutching her light jacket closer, she turned toward the house.

  • A warm hand rested on her waist.

  • Eureka helped him by flying into the faces of the enemy and scratching and biting furiously, and the kitten ruined so many vegetable complexions that the Mangaboos feared her as much as they did the horse.

  • No; she just dug her claws into the wood and climbed down the sides of this house to the ground.

  • Facebook doesn't return her call.

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